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See detailDoes lobar or size-reduced lung transplantation offer satisfactory early and late outcomes?
Silva, João Santos; Olland, Anne; Massard, Gilbert UL et al

in Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (2020)

A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether size-reduced or lobar lung transplantation (LLTx) offers the same benefit as classic lung ... [more ▼]

A best evidence topic was constructed according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether size-reduced or lobar lung transplantation (LLTx) offers the same benefit as classic lung transplantation (LTx). Of the 147 papers found using the reported search, 9 were selected to provide the best evidence. Details of the studies regarding authors, date, journal, country of publication, study type, group studied, relevant outcomes and results are given. All studies reported survival rates of LLTx and most compared it with classical LTx. No statistical differences were reported in medium term and long term. Two of the studies reported a higher incidence of postoperative complications, such as the need for cardiopulmonary bypass, reperfusion oedema or primary graft dysfunction, and longer intubation or intensive care unit stay times. Although the largest study showed a significantly worse 1-year survival in LLTx, a sub-analysis considering patients successfully discharged showed similar outcomes at 1, 3 and 5 years when compared with classic LTx patients. We conclude that LLTx is a valid therapeutic option for recipients with significant donor size mismatch, offering similar outcomes as classical LTx in the medium term and long term. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes Motivation in Physical Education Have an Impact on Out-of-School Physical Activity over Time? A Longitudinal Approach
Hutmacher, Djenna UL; Eckelt, Melanie UL; Bund, Andreas UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(19), 7258

Previous research based on the trans-contextual model proposes that autonomous motivation in physical education (PE) is transferable to an out-of-school leisure-time (LT) context. However, only cross ... [more ▼]

Previous research based on the trans-contextual model proposes that autonomous motivation in physical education (PE) is transferable to an out-of-school leisure-time (LT) context. However, only cross-sectional and unidirectional analyses have been conducted. The present study used a longitudinal design assessing N = 1681 students (M = 14.68 years) on two occasions, measuring the following constructs: perceived need for support in PE, motivational regulation during PE and LT, attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intention, and physical activity behavior. Findings based on mixed effect models revealed that autonomy, competence, and relatedness support of the PE teacher were positively related to autonomous motivation. Moreover, similar motivational regulation types were found to significantly cross-lag across contexts. Through longitudinal mediation analyses, further support for the impact of autonomous motivation on physical activity, mediated by intention, attitude, and perceived behavioral control, was found. Suggestions for educational stakeholders regarding how to promote students’ autonomous motivation are provided. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes nationality matter? The impact of expectations on student teachers’ judgments
Glock, Sabine UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

in Social Psychology of Education (2013), 16

In Germany, Turkish students are overrepresented on lowest school tracks. Research has provided evidence that stereotypical expectations can color judgments. We experimentally investigated whether student ... [more ▼]

In Germany, Turkish students are overrepresented on lowest school tracks. Research has provided evidence that stereotypical expectations can color judgments. We experimentally investigated whether student information that strongly confirmed or disconfirmedTurkish stereotypical expectations led to student teachers’ judgments that were biased against nationality. Furthermore, we explored whether judging an expectation- confirming or expectation-disconfirming Turkish student resulted in changes in stereotypical beliefs. Results showed that student teachers’ judgments were biased against nationality when it came to an expectation-confirming student and that the expectation-disconfirming student could change stereotypical beliefs into slightly more positive ones. Results are discussed with regard to their theoretical relevance as well as to their importance for teacher education. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 256 (11 UL)
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See detailDoes nicotine deprivation affect attentional performance?
Mancuso, Giovanna UL

Poster (2000)

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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2016, February 04)

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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2016, October 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (1 UL)
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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Presentation (2016, November 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (1 UL)
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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Presentation (2017, January 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (1 UL)
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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Presentation (2016, February 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (1 UL)
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See detailDoes Oil and Gold Price Uncertainty matter for the Stock Market?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL; Bams, D.; Blanchard, G. et al

in Journal of Empirical Finance (2017), 44(-), 270-285

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See detailDoes Patenting Help or Hinder Open Innovation? Evidence from New Technology Organizations in the Solar Industry
Zobel, Ann-Kristin; Balsmeier, Benjamin UL; Chesbrough, Henry

in Industrial and Corporate Change (2016), 25

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See detailDoes Physical Activity Moderate the Influence of Sedentary Behavior on Health in Young People?
Schembri, Emanuel UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Samuel, Robin UL

in Medicine Science in Sports Exercise (2021), 53(8S), 183--184

PURPOSE: High level of sedentary behavior (SB) may cause a number of health complaints (nHC) and lead to reduced self-rated health (SRH) in young people. The purpose of this study was to determine the ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: High level of sedentary behavior (SB) may cause a number of health complaints (nHC) and lead to reduced self-rated health (SRH) in young people. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between SB, the magnitude of nHC, SRH, body mass index (BMI), and whether the amount of physical activity (PA) moderates this relationship. METHODS: The data was obtained from Youth Survey Luxembourg 2019 (N = 2802). The population characteristics include sociodemographic data such as age, gender, and socio-economics status (SES) (0 = low to 18 = high). The severity of nHC was the sum score of headaches, stomach aches, back aches, depression, irritableness, nervousness, dizziness, and difficulty falling asleep (0 = low to 32 = high). BMI was calculated by dividing body weight to the square of body height (kg/m2). SRH was measured on a 5-point scale (1 = very good to 5 = very bad). PA and SB were generated from factor analyses of the questionnaire items. SB is separated between leisure and gaming. Multiple regression analysis, adjusted for age, gender, and SES, was used to determine the relationships between SB, nHC, BMI, and SRH, and the moderating effect of PA. RESULTS: Out of the participants, 54% were female and 46% were male with the mean age of 22 ± 4 years (16-29 years). The mean SES was 9.3 ± 2.2 (1-13), BMI was 23 ± 4 kg/m2 (14-47 kg/m2), severity of the nHC was 9 ± 6 (0-32), and SRH was 1.8 ± 0.6 (1-5). The multiple regression analysis shows that high SB through leisure is associated with more severe nHC (unstandardized coefficient b = .49, p < .01). However, PA can decrease nHC (b = .39, p < .01) for participants with high leisure SB. No association has been found between SRH, BMI, and leisure SB. Furthermore, an increase in SB through gaming is associated with higher BMI (b = .35, p < .01) and worse SRH (b = .09, p < .00). A relationship between the severity of nHC and gaming is not found. In all cases, a higher PA shows a significantly better nHC, SRH, and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that PA has a positive moderating effect of the relationship on leisure SB and nHC in young people in Luxembourg. Increased SB causes higher nHC, worse SRH, and higher BMI and young people who do more PA have lower severity in nHC, and better BMI and SRH. Therefore, it is important for young people to reduce SB and implement a sufficient amount of PA to improve overall health. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes physical learning environment matter? Effects after the move to a new campus on the perception of the quality of studies
Steffgen, Georges UL; Vesely, Jana; Pinto Costa, Andreia UL

Poster (2017, September 18)

The present study examined the effects of a move to a new physical learning environment – Belval Campus – on the students’ satisfaction with the course program in psychology. It was hypothesized that the ... [more ▼]

The present study examined the effects of a move to a new physical learning environment – Belval Campus – on the students’ satisfaction with the course program in psychology. It was hypothesized that the move to a new and modern University campus with better study facilities increases course climate, learning promotion, and skill acquisition. Participants were 538 undergraduate students who completed the Bachelor Evaluation Questionnaire, which assessed the perceived quality of the course program as well as five infrastructure and equipment aspects of the new campus. Findings show that students were more satisfied with the classrooms, the capacity of the rooms, and the library facilities, but there was no increase in perceived course climate, learning promotion, and skill acquisition of the students after 6 months nor after 18 months from the move. The implications of these findings for the need to change physical learning environments are discussed and recommendations for the design of learning environments are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes relative and subjective family affluence influence overweight, body image and weight reduction behaviour of adolescents in Luxembourg?
Residori, Caroline UL; Willems, Helmut UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2017, June 19)

Plateauing and rising levels of obesity and overweight in children and youth are growing concerns and the relations between socio-economic status (SES) and dietary behaviour and weight outcomes are very ... [more ▼]

Plateauing and rising levels of obesity and overweight in children and youth are growing concerns and the relations between socio-economic status (SES) and dietary behaviour and weight outcomes are very varied across countries. Empirical findings about the influences of socio-economic status (SES) on these health behaviours and outcomes differ depending on the measurement of SES used. Considering alternative conceptualisations of SES (measuring absolute, relative or subjective dimensions) is therefore advocated when analysing health inequalities in countries with high levels of overall affluence. As a country with high overall affluence and growing inequalities, Luxembourg allows for a further exploration of socio-economic inequalities in dietary behaviour and weight outcomes of young people in affluent contexts. The analysis aims to identify the relation between socio-economic inequalities and the dietary behaviour and weight outcomes of young people in Luxembourg. Data relating to family affluence, perceived wealth, dietary behaviour and BMI was gathered from 11 to 18 year-old pupils (n= 7233) using the HBSC questionnaire in the context of the 2014 HBSC wave in Luxembourg and is analysed using multiple logistic regression. The results indicate that there are different patterns of association of absolute, relative and subjective affluence with dietary behaviour and weight outcomes of young people aged between 11 and 18 in Luxembourg. While weight outcomes are socially stratified by all aspects of family affluence, after adjustment for overweight body image is associated to subjective family affluence and weight reduction behaviour is associated to absolute and relative family affluence. The results thus confirm a differentiated association of different aspects of SES to dietary behaviour and weight outcomes and confirm, that health inequalities between health outcomes or behaviours are linked to different processes. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes self-knowledge advance political justification? The case of public philosophy and Stout’s “unconstrained discourse”
Burks, Deven UL

Scientific Conference (2017, June)

Can self-knowledge of personal attitudes and belief-formation figure as a requirement on those engaging in political justification? Would this not be asking too much of participants both at the personal ... [more ▼]

Can self-knowledge of personal attitudes and belief-formation figure as a requirement on those engaging in political justification? Would this not be asking too much of participants both at the personal and associational level and at the institutional and governmental level? Yet such a requirement seems to follow on Jeffrey Stout’s pragmatist-expressivist account of political discourse and justification as reason-giving or “unconstrained discourse” (Stout, 2004). This self-knowledge requirement comes out in his emphasis on an individual justificatory standpoint, from which the person articulates reasons and beliefs and engages in (self-)storytelling and narration in order to express openly to the audience that person’s motivations and justification for a given political position (Stout, 2010). If his political epistemology so requires self-knowledge and “public” philosophy serves to guide political justification, the question remains by what means or resources “public” philosophy may advance the kind of self-knowledge required on the behalf of participants. To that end, Leiter (2016) may provide useful contrast as a critique of the notion of “discursive hygiene” in justification (as opposed to “rhetoric”) by elaborating the challenges posed to this notion by the obscurity of belief-formation, emotivism and tribalism. If Stout is seen to advance a view of public philosophy and political justification akin to “discursive hygiene”, Leiter’s critique poses a serious challenge to the former’s political epistemology and pragmatist-expressivist account of political justification. In short, “unconstrained discourse” would provide no meaningful standards for such justification or its participants. Our first question then is to know whether Stout can overcome both the prima facie obstacles which this epistemological requirement sets participants and Leiter’s naturalistic challenge to “public” philosophy and political justification. Provisionally, we may respond that Stout takes important steps to circumscribe the role of “public” philosophy and political justification within other publicly available modes of acculturation and moral inculcation. Our second question lies in whether Stout and Leiter then concur on the need for “rhetoric” as an argumentative standard for political justification. In the end, we will conclude that Leiter’s “rhetoric” and Stout’s “unconstrained discourse” are closer than they might at first appear. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes self-selection affect samples' representativeness in online surveys? An investigation in online video game research.
Khazaal, Yasser; van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne et al

in Journal of Medical Internet Research (2014), 16(7), 164

BACKGROUND: The number of medical studies performed through online surveys has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite their numerous advantages (eg, sample size, facilitated access to individuals ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The number of medical studies performed through online surveys has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite their numerous advantages (eg, sample size, facilitated access to individuals presenting stigmatizing issues), selection bias may exist in online surveys. However, evidence on the representativeness of self-selected samples in online studies is patchy. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to explore the representativeness of a self-selected sample of online gamers using online players' virtual characters (avatars). METHODS: All avatars belonged to individuals playing World of Warcraft (WoW), currently the most widely used online game. Avatars' characteristics were defined using various games' scores, reported on the WoW's official website, and two self-selected samples from previous studies were compared with a randomly selected sample of avatars. RESULTS: We used scores linked to 1240 avatars (762 from the self-selected samples and 478 from the random sample). The two self-selected samples of avatars had higher scores on most of the assessed variables (except for guild membership and exploration). Furthermore, some guilds were overrepresented in the self-selected samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that more proficient players or players more involved in the game may be more likely to participate in online surveys. Caution is needed in the interpretation of studies based on online surveys that used a self-selection recruitment procedure. Epidemiological evidence on the reduced representativeness of sample of online surveys is warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes size asymmetry exacerbate the inefficiency of tax competition?
Han, Yutao UL; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

in Economics Letters (2014), 122

Many authors demonstrate that the tax gap resulting from tax competition increases with the size asymmetry of the competing countries. Consequently, increasing country-size disparities exacerbates the ... [more ▼]

Many authors demonstrate that the tax gap resulting from tax competition increases with the size asymmetry of the competing countries. Consequently, increasing country-size disparities exacerbates the inefficiency of tax competition. The aim of this note is to show that this classical view has no general validity, if we consider that countries compete not only in taxes, but also in the provision of infrastructure. The simple model we develop for this purpose demonstrates that the effect of size disparity on efficiency depends crucially on the degree of international capital mobility. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 286 (131 UL)
See detailDoes sport make a difference? An exploration of the impact of sport on the social integration of young people.
Biesta, Gert UL; Stams, G. J. J. M.; Dirks, E. et al

in Steenbergen, J.; de Knop, P.; Elling, A. H. F. (Eds.) Values and norms in sport. (2001)

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (0 UL)
See detailDoes tax competition increase disparity among jurisdictions?
Han, Yutao; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

This paper investigates whether a less-developed economy can catch up with a more developed one when they compete for foreign direct investments. The main message of the paper is that jurisdictional ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates whether a less-developed economy can catch up with a more developed one when they compete for foreign direct investments. The main message of the paper is that jurisdictional competition can enable the lagging country to catch up if capital mobility is sufficiently high and the productivity gap is not too large. Further, we show that size asymmetry reinforces (weakens) the productivity catch-up resulting from interjurisdictional competition when the lagging economy is small (large). Finally, we demonstrate that the development gap widens when capital becomes less mobile, which is at odds with previous findings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (5 UL)