Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
See detailDoes Born-Digital Heritage turn Historians into Digital Historians?
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, October 10)

On three levels within digital history - the use of (1) digital sources, (2) digital tools (3) digital narratives, this presentation aims to demonstrate how the practice of born-digital heritage opens new ... [more ▼]

On three levels within digital history - the use of (1) digital sources, (2) digital tools (3) digital narratives, this presentation aims to demonstrate how the practice of born-digital heritage opens new possibilities but also issues for historians. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes cargo matter? The impact of air cargo operations on departure on-time performance for combination carriers
Lange, Anne UL

in Transportation Research. Part A, Policy and Practice (2019), 119

Detailed reference viewed: 206 (12 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes change in attention control mediate the impact of tDCS on attentional bias for threat? Limited evidence from a double-blind sham-controlled experiment in an unselected sample
Coussement, Charlotte; Maurage, Pierre; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2019), 59(1), 16-32

Neurocognitive models of attentional bias for threat posit that attentional bias may result from a decreased activation of the left prefrontal cortex, and especially of its dorsolateral part (dlPFC ... [more ▼]

Neurocognitive models of attentional bias for threat posit that attentional bias may result from a decreased activation of the left prefrontal cortex, and especially of its dorsolateral part (dlPFC), resulting in an impaired attention control. Consequently, a transient increase of neural activity within the left dlPFC via non-invasive brain stimulation reduces attentional bias among both anxious and nonanxious participants. Yet, it is still unclear whether the impact of dlPFC activation on attentional bias is mediated by improvement in attention control. In this experiment, we sought to test this hypothesis in an unselected sample (n = 20). Accordingly, we adopted a double-blind within-subject protocol in which we delivered a single-session of anodal versus sham transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) over the left dlPFC during the completion of a task assessing attention control. We also assessed its subsequent impact on attentional bias. Neither attention control nor attentional bias did significantly improve following anodal tDCS. Although our results did not support our main hypothesis, we believe the present null results to be particularly useful for future meta-research in the field. We also formulated a series of methodological recommendations for future research aiming at testing the tDCS-induced modification of attentional bias. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 110 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Childhood General Cognitive Ability at Age 12 Predict Subjective Well-Being at Age 52?
Chmiel, Magda UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

in Journal of Research in Personality (2012), 46

Drawing on a broad, multidimensional conceptualization of subjective well-being, this study examined the power of childhood general cognitive ability to predict life satisfaction, satisfaction with eight ... [more ▼]

Drawing on a broad, multidimensional conceptualization of subjective well-being, this study examined the power of childhood general cognitive ability to predict life satisfaction, satisfaction with eight individual life domains, and the frequency of experiencing positive and negative affect in middle adulthood. Data were obtained from a representative Luxembourgish sample (N = 738; 53% female) in a longitudinal study conducted in 1968 and 2008. Childhood general cognitive ability was unrelated to life satisfaction, negatively related to negative affect and satisfaction with free time, and positively related to positive affect and satisfaction with some of the life domains associated with socioeconomic success (i.e. finances, self, housing, work, or health). This predictive power persisted even when childhood socioeconomic status was controlled. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 171 (16 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes compliance with the German Corporate Governance Code pay off?: An investigation of the implied cost of capital
Kaspereit, Thomas UL; Lopatta, Kerstin UL; Zimmermann, Jochen

in Journal of Risk Finance (2015), 16(3), 344-376

This paper aims to empirically investigate the relationship between the level of compliance with the German Corporate Governance Code’s (GCGC) recommendations and the implied cost of equity capital (ICC ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to empirically investigate the relationship between the level of compliance with the German Corporate Governance Code’s (GCGC) recommendations and the implied cost of equity capital (ICC). German listed companies are required by law to annually disclose their compliance with the recommendations of the GCGC. Whether the GCGC achieves its aim to promote the trust of stakeholders in the management and supervision is still an open question [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Conscientiousness Matter for Academic Success? Considering Different Facets of Conscientiousness and Different Educational Outcomes
Franzen, Patrick UL; van der Westhuizen, Lindie UL; Arens, A. Katrin et al

Poster (2020, April)

Conscientiousness is the strongest BIG-5 predictor of academic success. Both conscientiousness and academic success are broad concepts, consisting of multiple lower level facets. Conscientiousness facets ... [more ▼]

Conscientiousness is the strongest BIG-5 predictor of academic success. Both conscientiousness and academic success are broad concepts, consisting of multiple lower level facets. Conscientiousness facets might display differential relations to different indicators of academic success. To investigate these relations, conscientiousness facets need to be measured in an economic and valid way. We conducted two studies, validating a short conscientiousness scale measuring seven facets of conscientiousness (Industriousness, Task Planning, Perfectionism, Procrastination Refrainment, Tidiness, Control, Cautiousness), and testing the relations of these facets with GPA, test scores, school satisfaction, and engagement. The results supported the validity of the scale. Industriousness, Perfectionism, and Cautiousness revealed the highest relations to academic outcomes. GPA and test scores showed differential associations with the different conscientiousness facets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (7 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) prolong the remission phase of insulin-dependent diabetic children? Preliminary findings of a randomized prospective study
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Bruining, G. J.; Aarsen, R. S. R. et al

in Netherlands Journal of Medicine (1985), 28(SUPPL. 1), 53-54

[No abstract available]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes disgust increase parasympathetic activation in individuals with a history of fainting? A psychophysiological analysis of disgust stimuli with and without blood-injection- injury association.
Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anne N.; Vögele, Claus UL; Gerlach, Alexander L.

in Journal of Anxiety Disorders (2012), 26(8)

People with blood-injection-injury fear can faint when being confronted with blood, injections or injuries. Page (1994) holds that people with blood-injury phobia faint, because they are disgust sensitive ... [more ▼]

People with blood-injection-injury fear can faint when being confronted with blood, injections or injuries. Page (1994) holds that people with blood-injury phobia faint, because they are disgust sensitive and disgust facilitates fainting by eliciting parasympathetic activity. We tested the following two hypotheses: (1) Disgusting pictures elicit more disgust in blood-injection-injury anxious people with a history of fainting than they do in controls. (2) Disgust causes parasympathetic activation. Subjects were 24 participants with high blood-injection-injury fear and a history of fainting in anxiety relevant situations and 24 subjects with average blood-injection-injury fear and no fainting history. We analyzed self-reported feelings of disgust, anxiety and faintness and reactions in heart rate, skin conductance, blood pressure and respiratory sinus arrhythmia during the confrontation with disgusting pictures with and without blood content.We did not find any evidence that the blood-injection-injury anxious subjects were more disgust sensitive than the control subjects and we also did not find any evidence that disgust elicits parasympathetic activation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes eliminating international profit shifting increase tax revenue in high-tax countries?
Pieretti, Patrice UL; Pulina, Giuseppe

in Economic Modelling (2020), 93

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes emotion have a gender? Violence, bullying and emphaty at school. Girls‘ and boys‘ experiences
Kerivel, Aude UL

Scientific Conference (2016, July 13)

Our research departed from the topic of violence at school, with the focus on school climate. Victimation surveys (which consider children’s point of view, and not only teachers’ point of view) have ... [more ▼]

Our research departed from the topic of violence at school, with the focus on school climate. Victimation surveys (which consider children’s point of view, and not only teachers’ point of view) have allowed to expand the question of violence and bullying to school climate Girls and boys at school, are usually called by their gender. According to teachers, violence at school is essentially the question of boys, as shown by Ayral (2012), and are most often sanctionned. (In her survey in Collège 84-97% of pupils, sanctionned for violence against others, are boys). Work on violence at school leads us to look at children’s experience to understand a subjective phenomenon (Michaud, 1978) and to consider the point of view of victims, of authors, and witnesses, as well as the context: Elementary School. The observation of girls groups vs boys groups leads to different experiences of violence and different perceptions of places at school. But these differences are less important than teachers‘ representations. Interactions between a teacher and pupils, and also among pupils, generated from the pedagogic moment in the classroom, and emphasize differences between girls and boys. Empathy traning contributes to reducing gaps between boys and girls, constitues an interesting line of approach. While girls and boys‘ emotions are realtively similar, (they are similar representations) , then why observing such a difference in violence expression (action are more different) ? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 151 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes European Integration Lead to a 'Presidentialization' of Executive Politics? Ministerial Selection in Swedish Postwar Cabinets
Bäck, Hanna; Dumont, Patrick UL; Meier, Henk Erik et al

in EUROPEAN UNION POLITICS (2009), 10(2), 226-252

In this article, we address recent claims that executive legislative relations in parliamentary democracies are undergoing important changes owing to either a 'presidentialization' or a 'Europeanization ... [more ▼]

In this article, we address recent claims that executive legislative relations in parliamentary democracies are undergoing important changes owing to either a 'presidentialization' or a 'Europeanization' of domestic political systems. Therefore, we test empirically whether parliamentary democracies are indeed experiencing changes in executive-legislative relations and whether these developments can, in part, be explained by an increase in European integration. Using data on ministerial selection in Swedish cabinets during the years 1952-2006, we find that there appears to be a slight tendency towards 'presidentialization', which is indicated by a decrease in ministers with a parliamentary background being appointed, and that there exists some support for the notion that Sweden's political and economic integration into the European Union is part of the explanation for this change. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes Extensive Training at Individuating Novel Objects in Adulthood Lead to Visual Expertise? The Role of Facelikeness.
Lochy, Aliette UL; Zimmermann, Friederike G. S.; Laguesse, Renaud et al

in Journal of cognitive neuroscience (2018), 30(4), 449-467

Human adults have a rich visual experience thanks to seeing human faces since birth, which may contribute to the acquisition of perceptual processes that rapidly and automatically individuate faces ... [more ▼]

Human adults have a rich visual experience thanks to seeing human faces since birth, which may contribute to the acquisition of perceptual processes that rapidly and automatically individuate faces. According to a generic visual expertise hypothesis, extensive experience with nonface objects may similarly lead to efficient processing of objects at the individual level. However, whether extensive training in adulthood leads to visual expertise remains debated. One key issue is the extent to which the acquisition of visual expertise depends on the resemblance of objects to faces in terms of the spatial configuration of parts. We therefore trained naive human adults to individuate a large set of novel parametric multipart objects. Critically, one group of participants trained with the objects in a "facelike" stimulus orientation, whereas a second group trained with the same objects but with the objects rotated 180 degrees in the picture plane into a "nonfacelike" orientation. We used a fast periodic visual stimulation EEG protocol to objectively quantify participants' ability to discriminate untrained exemplars before and after training. EEG responses associated with the frequency of identity change in a fast stimulation sequence, which reflects rapid and automatic perceptual processes, were observed over lateral occipital sites for both groups before training. There was a significant, albeit small, increase in these responses after training but only for the facelike group and only to facelike stimuli. Our findings indicate that perceived facelikeness plays a role in visual expertise and highlight how the adult perceptual system exploits familiar spatial configurations when learning new object categories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes frequent augmented feedback really degrade learning? A meta-analysis
Marschall, Franz; Bund, Andreas UL; Wiemeyer, Josef

in Bewegung und Training (2007), 1

Detailed reference viewed: 309 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes goal orientation affect the salience of the means or the outcomes of a goal
Mustafic, Maida UL; Freund, Alexandra M.

Poster (2008, October)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes goal orientation affect the salience of the means or the outcomes of a goal - Preliminary results
Mustafic, Maida UL; Freund, Alexandra M.

Poster (2009, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes graphotactic knowledge influence the learning of new spellings presented in isolation?
Pacton, Sébastien; Treiman, Rebecca; Borchardt, G. et al

in Reading & Writing (2014), 4

Two experiments investigated whether and how the learning of spellings by French third graders is influenced by two graphotactic patterns: consonants cannot double in word-initial position (Experiment 1 ... [more ▼]

Two experiments investigated whether and how the learning of spellings by French third graders is influenced by two graphotactic patterns: consonants cannot double in word-initial position (Experiment 1) and consonants cannot double after single consonants (Experiment 2). Children silently read meaningful texts that contained three types of novel spellings: no doublet (e.g., mupile, guprane), doublet in a legal position (e.g., muppile, gupprane), and doublet in an illegal position (e.g., mmupile, guprrane). Orthographic learning was assessed with a task of spelling to dictation. In both experiments, children recalled items without doublets better than items with doublets. In Experiment 1, children recalled spellings with a doublet in illegal word-initial position better than spellings with a doublet in legal word-medial position, and almost all misspellings involved the omission of the doublet. The fact that the graphotactic violation in an item like mmupile was in the salient initial position may explain why children often remembered both the presence and the position of the doublet. In Experiment 2, children recalled non-words with a doublet before a single consonant (legal, e.g., gupprane) better than those with a doublet after a single consonant (illegal, e.g., guprrane). Omission of the doublet was the most frequent error for both types of items. Children also made some transposition errors on items with a doublet after a single consonant, recalling for example gupprane instead of guprrane. These results suggest that, when a doublet is in the hard-to-remember medial position, children sometimes remember that an item contains a doublet but not which letter is doubled. Their knowledge that double consonants can occur before but not after single consonants leads to transposition errors on items like guprrane. These results shed new light on the conditions under which children use general knowledge about the graphotactic patterns of their writing system to reconstruct spellings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes impulsivity relate to perceived dependence on and actual use of the mobile phone?
Billieux, Joël UL; Van der Linden, M.; D'Acremont, M. et al

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2007), 21(4), 527-537

Several authors have studied the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. large debts incurred by young people, banned or dangerous use of cellular phones). The aim of this study is to ... [more ▼]

Several authors have studied the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. large debts incurred by young people, banned or dangerous use of cellular phones). The aim of this study is to analyse whether impulsivity, which has often been related to various forms of addictive behaviours, is associated with massive use of and dependence on the mobile phone. In this study, 108 female undergraduate psychology students were screened using a questionnaire evaluating actual use of and perceived dependence on the mobile phone, and with the French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. This scale identifies four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviour: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation Seeking. The results showed that a relationship can be established between the use of and perceived dependence on the cellular phone and two facets of impulsivity: Urgency and lack of Perseverance. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (0 UL)
See detailDoes Isolation have a cost? Explaining the gender wage gap by the social capital gap with UK data
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Addis, Elisabetta

Presentation (2015, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes it Pay to Invest in Art? A Selection-corrected Returns Perspective
Kräussl, Roman UL; Korteweg, Arthur; Verwijmeren, Patrick

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes it pay to invest in art? A selection-corrected returns perspective
Kräussl, Roman UL; Verwijmeren, P.; Korteweg, A.

in Review of Financial Studies (2016), 29(4), 1007-1038

Detailed reference viewed: 598 (52 UL)