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See detailDigital Cultural Heritage and the Politics of Digitisation
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 11)

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for ... [more ▼]

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for historical research? Is the often-lauded democratising potential of digitisation also offset by challenges, inherent in selection processes that might privilege the digitisation of heritage corresponding to existing national master narratives, the availability of funding and/or the priorities set by cultural policies and certain research agendas? How does transnational heritage fit into this picture when most digitisation projects are, in one way or another, nationally framed? What biases can digital archives introduce in our work and how does that differ from issues of bias and selection in the ‘paper’ archive? A key point to highlight is that professional historians can and should be more open to learn from the experience of digital archivists and librarians who are at the forefront of the digital turn in heritage wsk. the talk will conclude with a brief plea and suggestion for transparancy guidelines for digital resources. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital Detective Work: Connecting Cheminformatics, Mass Spectrometry and our Environment (analytica Conference)
Schymanski, Emma UL; Bolton, Evan

Scientific Conference (2020, October 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (1 UL)
See detailDigital Education in Luxembourg
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

Report (2019)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital Euro: opportunity or (legal) challenge?
Lupinu, Pier Mario UL

in Ianus: Diritto e Finanza (2021), (22), 27

In the euro area today, there are two ways in which the central bank provides money to its economy. The first consists in the issue of physical banknotes, while the second is expressed through the ... [more ▼]

In the euro area today, there are two ways in which the central bank provides money to its economy. The first consists in the issue of physical banknotes, while the second is expressed through the electronic accreditation of deposits on current accounts that credit institutions hold at the central bank. In the last five years, following both the increase in the digitalisation of the modern economy and the example of hegemonic economies (such as China), the possible introduction of a new form of currency to provide a safe and stable mean of payment to citizens of the euro area has had the power to create a growing interest towards such ambitious solutions. As a result, in the very near future we could experience a different way in which money works. We refer to the uncharted world of central bank digital currencies (CBDC). While projects for the creation of central bank digital currencies are booming all around the world, such interest is driven by various reasons that will be analysed in this paper, including the need to react to private initiatives for the creation of cryptocurrencies and stablecoins and, an increasing demand for fast and interconnected digital financial instruments and products. In the euro area, even if the debate for the creation of a Digital Euro has recently started, the ECB has proven to be already engaged in investigations, public consultations, and discussions with focus groups with the aim to provide European citizens, firms, and intermediaries with a “public” payment instrument suitable for a new digital era. In this framework, the role of a Eurosystem central bank digital currency will be analysed from a legal perspective. First, apart from the abovementioned reasons leading to the creation of a CBDC, it will be crucial to examine the structure and design of the Digital Euro, together with its objectives and the needs of its users. Consequently, while investigating on the legal framework which will permit the introduction of this digital currency, through a light review of similar models adopted (or in adoption) by other countries, we will seek to assess whether legal issues might hinder the realisation of this project or its actual implementation, especially concerning the impact on monetary policy, the international role of the euro and the banking sector. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital Finance & The COVID-19 Crisis
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Arner, Douglas; Barberis, Janos Nathan et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

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See detailDigital health in ambulatory assessment
Vögele, Claus UL

Book published by INSIDE (2017)

In this volume all accepted contributions to the 5th Biennial Conference of the Society for Ambulatory Assessment are published. The number and quality of these contributions testify to the high standard ... [more ▼]

In this volume all accepted contributions to the 5th Biennial Conference of the Society for Ambulatory Assessment are published. The number and quality of these contributions testify to the high standard of international research in ambulatory monitoring, the rapid advances in technology and data handling supporting ambulatory assessment, and the importance of these developments for the rapidly expanding area of Digital Health. Converging technologies such as Internet applications, social networks, smartphones and wearable sensors in the area of health, are now beginning to transform our approach to health research, healthcare, and communication and access to information. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital health: navigating towards meaningful and sustainable solutions
Lygidakis, Charilaos UL

Scientific Conference (2017, October 18)

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See detailDigital Heritage and Heritagization
Musiani, Francesca; Schafer, Valerie UL

in Recherches en Sciences Sociales sur Internet (2017), 6

Introduction to a special issueThe six articles and the introduction composing this issue fully situate themselves within the interdisciplinary dimension of digital heritage analyses, including ... [more ▼]

Introduction to a special issueThe six articles and the introduction composing this issue fully situate themselves within the interdisciplinary dimension of digital heritage analyses, including perspectives from history, information and communication sciences, sociology of innovation, digital humanities or juridical sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital Hermeneutics: The Reflexive Turn in Digital Public History?
Fickers, Andreas UL

in Zaagsma, Gerben; Noiret, Serge; Tabeau, Mark (Eds.) Handbook of Digital Public History (2022)

The digital – be it in forms of data, infrastructures, or tools – interferes atall levels in the practice of doing public history. This chapter argues that digitalpublic historians have to reflect more ... [more ▼]

The digital – be it in forms of data, infrastructures, or tools – interferes atall levels in the practice of doing public history. This chapter argues that digitalpublic historians have to reflect more deeply on the epistemological consequencesof their digital practices. It proposes the concept of “digital hermeneutics” as a conceptual framework for this reflection. As a “hermeneutics of in-betweenness,” digital hermeneutics investigates the trading zone of digital public history where new digital methods and approaches meet disciplinary traditions and epistemic cultures of history. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital History als ‚experimental space‘: Handels- und Transportnetzwerke in Gallien und Germanien sowie die Transportverbindung zwischen Mosel und Saône
Lotz, Jan Philipp UL

Doctoral thesis (2021)

This dissertation consists of two parts. In the first part, the focus lies on the study of trade and transport networks in the Gaulish and German provinces during the Roman Empire based on inscriptions ... [more ▼]

This dissertation consists of two parts. In the first part, the focus lies on the study of trade and transport networks in the Gaulish and German provinces during the Roman Empire based on inscriptions. Different approaches are used to tackle this topic, e.g. networks between different people and families, organisations and cities. The results show that networks between merchants or merchant families likely existed with the aim of securing and improving one’s own position in the business world. The networks between organisations show the close connection of these organisations among themselves and to the social and political elite. The spatial networks emphasize the important role of Lyon and show long-range connections of the merchants. The second part focuses on the reconstruction of the roman road between upper Saône and Moselle with the help of ancient, medieval and modern sources as well as digital methods like least cost path analysis. The results show that the road between Corre, Escles and Portieux is the most likely candidate, but it is also possible that other options existed. The dissertation is also part of the Doctoral Doctoral Training Unit ‚Digital History & Hermeneutics‘. One of the basic ideas of the DTU was a critical reflection on the epistemological and methodological challenges of doing historical research in the digital age and a critical and self-reflexive use of these new digital tools and technologies. Especially during the first part of the study, it became evident, that the fragmented nature of the sources leads to several problems when using the new digital methods and tools. This applies even more to Ancient History. The dealing with these problems became another important aspect of the dissertation. There is no point in denying the chances the digital turn and that it will change today’s academia landscape. They can be useful in historic research, but at the same time, they are still a journey into the unknown. It is of the utmost importance to keep a critical mindset towards the new developments, methods and tools. Detailed knowledge of the sources and especially their shortcomings is key. This also applies to their communication and to the documentation of the research process since digital methods can quickly produce impressive-looking results. Furthermore, not only methodological knowledge is required but, especially and probably even more importantly, methodological awareness. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital history and the politics of digitization
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 10)

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question of the politics of (cultural heritage) digitisation and its consequences for historical research. To put it simply, it discusses the question of why, where and how we can access what we can access. The online documentary record affects historical research and we need to understand how and in what ways our online evidentiary basis is constituted and might affect our research. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital History and the Politics of Digitization
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Presentation (2019, July 10)

This paper will present the first findings of an ongoing research project. It is about the digital resources we work with as historians; in the first place with regard to what is being digitized, the ... [more ▼]

This paper will present the first findings of an ongoing research project. It is about the digital resources we work with as historians; in the first place with regard to what is being digitized, the sources and data, and to a lesser degree the metadata, notwithstanding the latter’s profound political aspects and effects, e.g. with regard to access. To avoid misunderstandings: it is not about the politics of digital humanities more broadly conceived; e.g. about addressing claims that it is incumbent upon DH to fulfil a political mission or become a more self-critical discipline by consciously investigating its own gender, diversity and other biases. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital History as Historical Artifact
Takats, Sean UL

Scientific Conference (2018, October 12)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital History as Trading Zone? Reflections from a Doctoral Training Unit
van der Heijden, Tim UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 12)

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses the question how Digital History “trading zones” are being constituted in practice and how they are situated in physical working environments. The analysis is based on a case study of the Doctoral Training Unit (DTU) “Digital History and Hermeneutics”, an interdisciplinary research and training programme that was established at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C²DH) of the University of Luxembourg. The DTU is designed as an interdisciplinary “trading zone”, in which thirteen doctoral candidates with different disciplinary backgrounds – from history, linguistics and philosophy to computer and information science – reflect on the epistemological and methodological challenges of doing digital history and humanities research (Fickers 2015, 2012). The paper reflects on the project’s first year, in which the doctoral researchers were introduced to various skills and methods in digital humanities as part of the so-called “DH incubation phase”. This phase included trainings in text mining, digital source criticism, database structures, data visualization, GIS analysis, tool criticism and algorithmic critique. The paper presents some of the main practical and epistemological opportunities and challenges of “thinkering”: the playful experimentation with digital tools and technologies for doing historical research. It furthermore reflects on the practical and institutional challenges of constituting an interdisciplinary trading zone, like the DTU. As such, it addresses a number of critical questions: How to build bridges between different knowledge domains in a specific research environment? How to stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration and to get scholars out of their disciplinary or methodological comfort zones? What is at stake in such interdisciplinary trading zones? Who are the traders – and what is being traded? The analysis is informed by studies on interdisciplinarity (Klein 2015, Deegan and McCarty 2012, Stehr and Weingart 2000), trading zones (Collins et al. 2007, Galison 1996, Kemman 2019) and communities of practice (Wenger 1998). Empirically, it draws on a series of semi-structured interviews and thirty-nine self-reflexive training reports, in which the doctoral researchers of the DTU discuss their experiences of doing digital history and hermeneutics in an interdisciplinary setting. Finally, the paper evaluates the suitability of the trading zone concept as analytical framework for studying interdisciplinary collaborations in Digital History as a field. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital History of Technology: A Critical Dialogue / round table discussion
Fickers, Andreas UL

Presentation (2018, October 12)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital History Projects As Boundary Objects
Kemman, Max UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailDigital Humanities & Film Studies: Analyzing the Modalities of Moving Images
Burghardt, Manuel; Heftberger, Adelheid; Pause, Johannes UL et al

in Digital Humanities Quarterly (2020), 14(4),

Detailed reference viewed: 274 (2 UL)