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See detailRobert Triffin, a 'personal equation'
Danescu, Elena UL

in The Journal of European Economic History (2018)

Robert Triffin (1911-1993), a Belgian-born economist who spent much of his career in America, had a major influence on 20th-century economic thinking. He is particularly known for his monetary approach ... [more ▼]

Robert Triffin (1911-1993), a Belgian-born economist who spent much of his career in America, had a major influence on 20th-century economic thinking. He is particularly known for his monetary approach. His intellectual legacy revolves ariund the 'Triffin dilemma' or 'Triffin paradox'. Triffin accurately predicted the end of the Bretton Woods system, though not for the right reasons. Triffin stuck by his monetary theory that it was much harder to achieve sound international economic management with flexible exchange rates and that best practices were by no means a guarantee of global stability if they were not accompanied by genuine international coordination. Triffin was also a committed European. He was close to Jean Monnet and Pierre Werner and worked alongside them from the early 1960's onwards in favour of European monetary integration. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropa:Quo Vadis?
Danescu, Elena UL

in The Journal of European Economic History (2018)

The past few years have been a bleak period for Europe, dominated by the effects of a multidimensional systemic crisis (economic, financial, social, environmental and geopolitical), growing unease among ... [more ▼]

The past few years have been a bleak period for Europe, dominated by the effects of a multidimensional systemic crisis (economic, financial, social, environmental and geopolitical), growing unease among the general public and considerable turmoil among political elites. The aggressive rise of populism, the slow slide towards authoritarianism and the surge in nationalism have led to parochial tendencies, an erosion of solidarity and a growing ambivalence about the future of the shared European project. At the same time, in today’s globalised environment, the limits of the traditional economic model have become apparent as it grapples with the effects of “secular stagnation". A new paradigm is emerging, based on the importance of global public goods, of what is “common” to humanity, despite the divisions that seem to be driving it apart. [less ▲]

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