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See detailCorticosterone analgesia is mediated by the spinal production of neuroactive metabolites that enhance GABAergic inhibitory transmission on dorsal horn rat neurons.
Zell, Vivien; Juif, Pierre-Eric; Hanesch, Ulrike UL et al

in The European journal of neuroscience (2015)

Corticosterone (CORT) is a glucocorticoid produced by adrenal glands under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Circulating CORT can enter the central nervous system and be reduced to ... [more ▼]

Corticosterone (CORT) is a glucocorticoid produced by adrenal glands under the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Circulating CORT can enter the central nervous system and be reduced to neuroactive 3alpha5alpha-reduced steroids, which modulate GABAA receptors. In the dorsal spinal cord, GABAergic transmission modulates integration of nociceptive information. It has been shown that enhancing spinal inhibitory transmission alleviates hyperalgesia and allodynia. Therefore, the spinal neuronal network is a pivotal target to counteract pain symptoms. Thus, any increase in spinal 3alpha5alpha-reduced steroid production enhancing GABAergic inhibition should reduce nociceptive message integration and the pain response. Previously, it has been shown that high levels of plasma glucocorticoids give rise to analgesia. However, to our knowledge, nothing has been reported regarding direct non-genomic modulation of neuronal spinal activity by peripheral CORT. In the present study, we used combined in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology approaches, associated with measurement of nociceptive mechanical sensitivity and plasma CORT level measurement, to assess the impact of circulating CORT on rat nociception. We showed that CORT plasma level elevation produced analgesia via a reduction in C-fiber-mediated spinal responses. In the spine, CORT is reduced to the neuroactive metabolite allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, which specifically enhances lamina II GABAergic synaptic transmission. The main consequence is a reduction in lamina II network excitability, reflecting a selective decrease in the processing of nociceptive inputs. The depressed neuronal activity at the spinal level then, in turn, leads to weaker nociceptive message transmission to supraspinal structures and hence to alleviation of pain. [less ▲]

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See detailSubthalamic nucleus stimulation restores the efferent cortical drive to muscle in parallel to functional motor improvement.
Weiss, Daniel; Breit, Sorin; Hoppe, Julia et al

in The European journal of neuroscience (2012), 35(6), 896-908

Pathological synchronization in large-scale motor networks constitutes a pathophysiological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). Corticomuscular synchronization in PD is pronounced in lower frequency ... [more ▼]

Pathological synchronization in large-scale motor networks constitutes a pathophysiological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). Corticomuscular synchronization in PD is pronounced in lower frequency bands (< 10 Hz), whereas efficient cortical motor integration in healthy persons is driven in the beta frequency range. Electroencephalogram and electromyogram recordings at rest and during an isometric precision grip task were performed in four perioperative sessions in 10 patients with PD undergoing subthalamic nucleus deep-brain stimulation: (i) 1 day before (D0); (ii) 1 day after (D1); (iii) 8 days after implantation of macroelectrodes with stimulation off (D8StimOff); and (iv) on (D8StimOn). Analyses of coherence and phase delays were performed in order to challenge the effects of microlesion and stimulation on corticomuscular coherence (CMC). Additionally, local field potentials recorded from the subthalamic nucleus on D1 allowed comprehensive mapping of motor-related synchronization in subthalamocortical and cerebromuscular networks. Motor performance improved at D8StimOn compared with D0 and D8StimOff paralleled by a reduction of muscular activity and CMC in the theta band (3.9-7.8 Hz) and by an increase of CMC in the low-beta band (13.7-19.5 Hz). Efferent motor cortical drives to muscle presented mainly below 10 Hz on D8StimOff that were suppressed on D8StimOn and occurred on higher frequencies from 13 to 45 Hz. On D1, coherence of the high-beta band (20.5-30.2 Hz) increased during movement compared with rest in subthalamomuscular and corticomuscular projections, whereas it was attenuated in subcorticocortical projections. The present findings lend further support to the concept of pathological network synchronization in PD that is beneficially modulated by stimulation. [less ▲]

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