References of "Reading and Writing"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreschool predictors of learning to read and spell in an additional language: a two-wave longitudinal study in a multilingual context.
Wealer, Cyril UL; Fricke, Silke; Loff, Ariana et al

in Reading and Writing (2022)

The study explores whether foundational skills of reading and spelling in preschool (age 5–6) predict literacy skills cross-linguistically in an additional language in Grade 1 (age 6–7). A sample of ... [more ▼]

The study explores whether foundational skills of reading and spelling in preschool (age 5–6) predict literacy skills cross-linguistically in an additional language in Grade 1 (age 6–7). A sample of linguistically diverse preschool children completed tasks of phonological awareness, letter-sound knowledge, verbal-short term memory, rapid automatized naming, and lexical knowledge in the language of preschool instruction Luxembourgish. The children were followed-up in Grade 1 where literacy skills were assessed in the language of schooling, i.e., German, after fve months of literacy instruction. German was a non-native language for all children. Longitudinal correlations confrm that individual diferences in single word/pseudoword reading and spelling in German in Grade 1 can be predicted by all the foundational literacy skills that were assessed in Luxembourgish. Path analyses showed that phonological awareness in Luxembourgish emerged as the strongest unique predictor of Grade 1 literacy skills in German. The second unique preschool predictor of Grade 1 literacy skills was letter-sound knowledge. Results are consistent with the view that literacy development in an additional language builds upon similar building blocks as literacy acquisition in a frst language, at least for languages that are typologically close. However, current fndings suggest that respective contributions between predictors and literacy skills in children learning to read in an additional language may vary from patterns observed in studies with children acquiring literacy in their frst language. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSuccessful written subject verb agreement: an online analysis of the procedure used by students in Grades 3, 5 and 12
Alamargot, Denis; Flouret, Lisa; Larocque, Denis et al

in Reading and Writing (2015), 28

This study was designed to (1) investigate the procedure responsible forsuccessful written subject–verb agreement, and (2) describe how it develops acrossgrades. Students in Grades 3, 5 and 12 were asked ... [more ▼]

This study was designed to (1) investigate the procedure responsible forsuccessful written subject–verb agreement, and (2) describe how it develops acrossgrades. Students in Grades 3, 5 and 12 were asked to read noun–noun–verb sen-tences aloud (e.g., Le chien des voisins mange [The dog of the neighbors eats]) andwrite out the verb inflections. Some of the nouns differed in number, thus inducingattraction errors. Results showed that third graders were successful because theyimplemented a declarative procedure requiring regressive fixations on the subjectnoun while writing out the inflection. A dual-step procedure (Hupet, Schelstraete,Demaeght, & Fayol, 1996) emerged in Grade 5, and was fully efficient by Grade 12.This procedure, which couples an automatized agreement rule with a monitoringprocess operated within working memory (without the need for regressive fixa-tions), was found to trigger a mismatch asymmetry (singular–plural [ plural–sin-gular) in Grade 5. The time course of written subject–verb agreement, the origin of agreement errors and differences between the spoken and written modalities are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes graphotactic knowledge influence the learning of new spellings presented in isolation?
Pacton, Sébastien; Treiman, Rebecca; Borchardt, G. et al

in Reading and Writing (2014), 4

Two experiments investigated whether and how the learning of spellings by French third graders is influenced by two graphotactic patterns: consonants cannot double in word-initial position (Experiment 1 ... [more ▼]

Two experiments investigated whether and how the learning of spellings by French third graders is influenced by two graphotactic patterns: consonants cannot double in word-initial position (Experiment 1) and consonants cannot double after single consonants (Experiment 2). Children silently read meaningful texts that contained three types of novel spellings: no doublet (e.g., mupile, guprane), doublet in a legal position (e.g., muppile, gupprane), and doublet in an illegal position (e.g., mmupile, guprrane). Orthographic learning was assessed with a task of spelling to dictation. In both experiments, children recalled items without doublets better than items with doublets. In Experiment 1, children recalled spellings with a doublet in illegal word-initial position better than spellings with a doublet in legal word-medial position, and almost all misspellings involved the omission of the doublet. The fact that the graphotactic violation in an item like mmupile was in the salient initial position may explain why children often remembered both the presence and the position of the doublet. In Experiment 2, children recalled non-words with a doublet before a single consonant (legal, e.g., gupprane) better than those with a doublet after a single consonant (illegal, e.g., guprrane). Omission of the doublet was the most frequent error for both types of items. Children also made some transposition errors on items with a doublet after a single consonant, recalling for example gupprane instead of guprrane. These results suggest that, when a doublet is in the hard-to-remember medial position, children sometimes remember that an item contains a doublet but not which letter is doubled. Their knowledge that double consonants can occur before but not after single consonants leads to transposition errors on items like guprrane. These results shed new light on the conditions under which children use general knowledge about the graphotactic patterns of their writing system to reconstruct spellings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (4 UL)