References of "Psychophysiology"
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See detailInteroception in Bulimia Nervosa: Evidence at cortical and self-report levels
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2019), 56(S1), 117

Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviors, such as self- induced vomiting. Body image disturbance is also prominent in BN. Current research is ... [more ▼]

Bulimia nervosa (BN) is characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating and compensatory behaviors, such as self- induced vomiting. Body image disturbance is also prominent in BN. Current research is trying to determine which dimensions and sensory domains of body perception are affected in BN. Regarding heartbeat perception, findings are inconclusive, with some studies reporting reduced and others reporting unaltered interoceptive accuracy in BN. The current study contributes further data on heartbeat perception by using an indicator of the cortical processing of cardio- afferent signals (heartbeat evoked potentials, HEPs). We investigated 22 women with current or partially remitted BN (BMI 23.94[3.61]; age 31.86[11.20]) and 22 healthy women (HC; BMI 24.24[3.37]; age 31.00[10.15]). Participants performed a heartbeat perception task (according to Schandry) with concurrent 64- channel- EEG and ECG recording. HEPs were calculated as mean EEG amplitudes in the interval 455- 595ms after the R- peak of the ECG. Results show no significant differences between the BN and HC groups, neither for heartbeat perception, HEPs, or mean heartrate. These results confirm previous findings of intact heartbeat perception in BN. In addition, cortical processing of cardio- afferent signals is unaltered. Heartbeat perception is particularly relevant for emotion processing and regulation. The previously reported emotion- regulation deficits in BN appear not to be based on altered CNS processing of cardiac signals [less ▲]

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See detailA Latent State-Trait Analysis of Interoceptive Accuracy
Wittkamp, M.; Bertsch, K.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2018), e0185802

Interoceptive accuracy (IAc), i.e. the ability to accurately perceive one’s own bodily signals, is widely assumed to be a trait, although experimental manipulations, such as stress, may affect IAc. We ... [more ▼]

Interoceptive accuracy (IAc), i.e. the ability to accurately perceive one’s own bodily signals, is widely assumed to be a trait, although experimental manipulations, such as stress, may affect IAc. We used structural equation modeling to estimate the reliability of IAc, and the proportions of individual differences in IAc, explained by a trait and occasion-specific effects of situation and person-situation interactions. We assessed IAc in 59 healthy participants (40 women, MAge = 23.4 years) on three consecutive measurement occasions, approx. one week apart, in a ‘rest’ and ‘poststress’ condition, using a heartbeat counting and a heartbeat discrimination task. The results show fair temporal stability (intraclass correlation coefficients ≥ 0.38) and good reliability (Mdn = .63; range .49-.83) for both methods. While around 40% of the variance of a single IAc measurement could be explained by a trait, approx. 27% were accounted for by occasion-specific effects of situation and person-situation interaction. These results suggest that IAc measures are relatively consistent and that situations and person-situation interactions impact IAc as measured at a certain point in time. An aggregation across at least two measurements is recommended when using IAc as a trait variable. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat our eyes tell us about feelings: Tracking pupillary responses during emotion regulation processes
Kinner, Valerie, L.; Kuchinke, Lars; Dierolf, Angelika UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(4),

Emotion regulation is essential for adaptive behavior and mental health. Strategies applied to alter emotions are known to differ in their impact on psychological and physiological aspects of the ... [more ▼]

Emotion regulation is essential for adaptive behavior and mental health. Strategies applied to alter emotions are known to differ in their impact on psychological and physiological aspects of the emotional response. However, emotion regulation outcome has primarily been assessed via self‐report, and studies comparing regulation strategies with regard to their peripheral physiological mechanisms are limited in number. In the present study, we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of different emotion regulation strategies on pupil dilation, skin conductance responses, and subjective emotional responses. Thirty healthy females were presented with negative and neutral pictures and asked to maintain or up‐ and downregulate their upcoming emotional responses through reappraisal or distraction. Pupil dilation and skin conductance responses were significantly enhanced when viewing negative relative to neutral pictures. For the pupil, this emotional arousal effect manifested specifically late during the pupillary response. In accordance with subjective ratings, increasing negative emotions through reappraisal led to the most prominent pupil size enlargements, whereas no consistent effect for downregulation was found. In contrast, early peak dilations were enhanced in all emotion regulation conditions independent of strategy. Skin conductance responses were not further modulated by emotion regulation. These results indicate that pupil diameter is modulated by emotional arousal, but is initially related to the extent of mental effort required to regulate automatic emotional responses. Our data thus provide first evidence that the pupillary response might comprise two distinct temporal components reflecting cognitive emotion regulation effort on the one hand and emotion regulation success on the other hand. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of acute stress on response inhibition in healthy men: An ERP study
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Böhnke, Robina et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(5), 684-695

The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor ... [more ▼]

The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor or a control condition, 39 healthy men performed a go/no-go task while ERPs (N2, P3), reaction times, errors, and salivary cortisol were measured. Acute stress impaired neither accuracy nor reaction times, but differentially affected the neural correlates of response inhibition; namely, stress led to enhanced amplitudes of the N2 difference waves (N2d, no-go minus go), indicating enhanced response inhibition and conflict monitoring. Moreover, participants responding to the stressor with an acute substantial rise in cortisol (high cortisol responders) showed reduced amplitudes of the P3 of the difference waves (P3d, no-go minus go) after the stressor, indicating an impaired evaluation and finalization of the inhibitory process. Our findings indicate that stress leads to a reallocation of cognitive resources to the neural subprocesses of inhibitory control, strengthening premotor response inhibition and the detection of response conflict, while concurrently diminishing the subsequent finalization process within the stream of processing. [less ▲]

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See detailAffective evaluation of body images in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(S1),

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by fear of weight gain. This is reflected in amygdala activation during confrontation with distorted photographs of oneself simulating weight gain. In contrast ... [more ▼]

Anorexia nervosa is characterized by fear of weight gain. This is reflected in amygdala activation during confrontation with distorted photographs of oneself simulating weight gain. In contrast, photographs of emaciated women induce startle attenuation, suggesting a positive valuation of extreme slimness. To combine these findings, we applied an affective startle modulation paradigm containing photos of the participants simulating weight gain and photos simulating weight loss. We assessed eye-blink startle responses via EMG in 20 women with anorexia nervosa (AN; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23) and 20 healthy control women (HC; mean age = 25 years; mean BMI = 23). We were able to replicate affective startle modulation of standard positive, negative, and neutral pictures, except for an absence of startle attenuation for positive pictures in AN. Body images did not modulate the startle response in either group. This was in contrast to the subjective ratings, in which the AN group indicated negative valence and high arousal for distorted body images. The body photographs used in our study emphasized general body shape and it appears that this was not threatening to AN patients. Photos highlighting body details might produce different results. Considering that body image exposure, a frequently used intervention tool for AN, aims at fear reduction through habituation, it is essential to determine which aspects of the body actually elicit fear responses to maximize therapy outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailBlood pressure and the perception of illusive pain
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Duschek, Stefan; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2016), 53(8), 1282-1291

Numerous studies have documented an inverse relationship between blood pressure and sensitivity to experimental nociceptive stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate possible associations ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have documented an inverse relationship between blood pressure and sensitivity to experimental nociceptive stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate possible associations between blood pressure and the occurrence and intensity of paradoxical pain induced by the thermal grill paradigm. Thirty-one healthy subjects were stimulated three times for 1 minute with the non-noxious temperatures of 15°C and 41°C set at the interlaced cold and warm bars of a water bath-driven thermal grill. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded concomitantly. On account of previous observations of an association between the sensitivity of the cardiac baroreflex and pain perception, this parameter was additionally obtained. Numerical rating scales were used to quantify subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness; subjects were classified as responders and non-responders to thermal grill stimulation based on pain intensity ratings. Responders exhibited lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure than non-responders, and inverse linear associations arose between blood pressure and pain intensity and unpleasantness. Baroreflex sensitivity was unrelated to pain ratings. The findings confirmed the hypothesis of a blood pressure dependence of paradoxical pain and support the notion that the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems interact not only in the processing of pain elicited by noxious input, but also in non-noxiously generated illusive pain. While this finding is not consistent with the assumption of an involvement of the baroreflex system in mediating the observed interaction, psychological traits and neurochemical factors are alternatively considered. [less ▲]

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See detailBody or cup? Alterations in featural and configural body image processing in anorexia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(supplement 1), 123

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See detailShort-term food deprivation increases amplitudes of heartbeat-evoked potentials
Schulz, André UL; Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Dierolf, Angelika UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2015), 52(5), 695-703

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate ... [more ▼]

Nutritional state, i.e. fasting or non-fasting, may affect the processing of interoceptive signals, but mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. We investigated 16 healthy women on two separate days: when satiated (standardized food intake) and after an 18 h food deprivation period. On both days, heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs) and cardiac and ANS activation indices (heart rate, nLF HRV) were assessed. The HEP is an EEG pattern that is considered an index of cortical representation of afferent cardiovascular signals. Average HEP activity (R-wave +455-595 ms) was enhanced during food deprivation compared to normal food intake. Cardiac activation did not differ between nutritional conditions. Our results indicate that short-term food deprivation amplifies an electrophysiological correlate of the cortical representation of visceral-afferent signals originating from the cardiovascular system. This effect could not be attributed to increased cardiac activation, as estimated by heart rate and nLF HRV, after food deprivation. [less ▲]

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See detailAcoustic startle reactivity while processing reward related food cues during food deprivation: evidence from women in different menstrual cycle phases and men
Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Plein, D.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2014), 51(2), 159-167

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See detailHeart rate variability as an indicator of self-regulatory processes in restrained eating behaviour
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in Psychophysiology (2013, September), 50(S1), 81

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See detailPsychomotor evidence for protection of cognitive processing
Schächinger, H.; Schilling, T. M.; Larra, M. et al

in Psychophysiology (2013), 50(Supplement 1), 6

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See detailAcoustic startle reflex in the processing of reward related food cues during food deprivation: evidence from men and women
Ferreira de Sá, D. S.; Plein, D. E.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2013), 50(Supplement 1), 121

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See detailThe cortisol awakening response is unrelated to psychophysiological cold pressor stress reactivity
Kozik, B.; Larra, M.; Schilling, T. M. et al

in Psychophysiology (2013), 50(Supplement 1), 122

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See detailStability of Heart Rate Variability Indices Reflecting Parasympathetic Activity
Bertsch, K.; Hagemann, D.; Naumann, E. et al

in Psychophysiology (2012), 49(5), 672-682

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See detailEnhanced memory consolidation by post-learning autonomic activation in response to stress
Larra y Ramirez, M.; Schulz, André UL; Naumann, E. et al

in Psychophysiology (2011), 48(Supplement 1), 88-88

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See detailModulation of the startle reflex by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors
Richter, S.; Schulz, André UL; Port, J. et al

in Psychophysiology (2009), 46(Supplement 1), 77-77

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See detailAversive associative conditioning of prepulses in a startle inhibition paradigm
Nees, F.; Hahn, M.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2009), 46(3), 481-486

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See detailDoes baro-afferent feedback respond to processes of classical conditioning?
Schilling, T. M.; Schulz, André UL; Stertz, A. M. et al

in Psychophysiology (2009), 46(Supplement 1), 64-64

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See detailStress induced reduction in high frequency heart rate variability cannot be explained by respiratory frequency changes
Kuehl, L. K.; Richter, S.; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2009), 46(Supplement 1), 77-78

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See detailThe impact of cold pressor stress on voice pitch (F0)
Plein, D. E.; Schulz, André UL; Richter, S. et al

in Psychophysiology (2009), 46(Supplement 1), 115-115

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