References of "Neurosurgery"
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See detailSpinal cord injuries entering the Fas(t) lane.
Letellier, Elisabeth UL; Martin-Villalba, Ana

in Neurosurgery (2007), 6

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See detailImplantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus in advanced Parkinson's disease with the aid of intraoperative microrecording under general anesthesia.
Hertel, Frank UL; Zuchner, Mark; Weimar, Inge et al

in Neurosurgery (2006), 59(5), 11381138

OBJECTIVE: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely accepted in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders. The standard implantation procedure is performed under local ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is widely accepted in the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) and other movement disorders. The standard implantation procedure is performed under local anesthesia (LA). Certain groups of patients may not be eligible for surgery under LA because of clinical reasons, such as massive fear, reduced cooperativity, or coughing attacks. Microrecording (MER) has been shown to be helpful in DBS surgery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of MER for DBS surgery under general anesthesia (GA) and to compare the data of intraoperative MER as well as the clinical data with that of the current literature of patients undergoing operation under LA. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: The data of nine patients with advanced PD (mean Hoehn and Yahr status, 4.2) who were operated with subthalamic nucleus (STN) DBS under GA, owing to certain clinical circumstances ruling out DBS under LA, were retrospectively analyzed. All operations were performed under analgosedation with propofol or remifentanil and intraoperative MER. For MER, remifentanil was ceased completely and propofol was lowered as far as possible. INTERVENTION: The STN could be identified intraoperatively in all patients with MER. The typical bursting pattern was identified, whereas a widening of the baseline noise could not be as adequately detected as in patients under LA. The daily off phases of the patients were reduced from 50 to 17%, whereas the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale III score was reduced from 43 (preoperative, medication off) to 19 (stimulation on, medication off) and 12 (stimulation on, medication on). Two patients showed a transient neuropsychological deterioration after surgery, but both also had preexisting episodes of disorientation. One implantable pulse generator infection was noticed. No further significant clinical complications were observed. CONCLUSION: STN surgery for advanced PD with MER guidance is possible with good clinical results under GA. Intraoperative MER of the STN region can be performed under GA with a special anesthesiological protocol. In this setting, the typical STN bursting pattern can be identified, whereas the typical widening of the background noise baseline while entering the STN region is obviously absent. This technique may enlarge the group of patients eligible for STN surgery. Although the clinical improvements and parameter settings in this study were within the range of the current literature, further randomized controlled studies are necessary to compare the results of STN DBS under GA and LA, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailPerfusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Vasospasm: A Useful New Tool in the Management of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.
Hertel, Frank UL; Walter, Christof; Bettag, Martin et al

in Neurosurgery (2006), 58(3), 590

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See detailPerfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with vasospasm: a useful new tool in the management of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.
Hertel, Frank UL; Walter, Christof; Bettag, Martin et al

in Neurosurgery (2005), 56(1), 28-3535

OBJECTIVE: Cerebral vasospasm (VSP) is one of the most important risk factors for the development of a delayed neurological deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Perfusion-weighted magnetic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Cerebral vasospasm (VSP) is one of the most important risk factors for the development of a delayed neurological deficit after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (pwMRI) provides the possibility of detecting tissue at risk for infarction. The objective of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and impact of pwMRI in the management of SAH patients. METHODS: From a consecutive series of 180 patients experiencing SAH and treated at our institution over a 3-year period, we identified 20 who underwent pwMRI during their acute illness. For these 20 patients, the results of pwMRI were compared with the results of diffusion-weighted MRI, transcranial Doppler sonography, and neurological examinations performed at the same time and with repeated pwMRI examinations of the same patient at different times. RESULTS: Nineteen of 20 patients showed perfusion changes predominantly in the time maps. Fifteen of 19 patients with changes in pwMRI had a neurological deficit at the same time. In 7 of 15 patients with neurological deterioration, transcranial Doppler sonography showed signs of VSP, whereas all 15 patients showed alterations in pwMRI. The areas of perfusion changes in pwMRI correlated well with the neurological deficits of the patients and were larger than the areas of changed diffusion in diffusion-weighted MRI performed at the same time. There were no clinical complications with regard to the pwMRI examinations. CONCLUSION: pwMRI is safe and helpful in the management of patients with VSP after SAH. The sensitivity of pwMRI is higher than that of transcranial Doppler sonography in the detection of decreased perfusion as a result of VSP. pwMRI can detect tissue at risk before definitive infarction occurs and therefore may lead to a change of therapy in those patients. [less ▲]

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