References of "Learning and Individual Differences"
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See detailMindfulness and Academic Emotions: A Field Study During a Lecture
Senker, Kerstin; Dietrich, Julia; Fries, Stefan et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2021)

The aim of the present study was to examine whether mindfulness and academic emotions are beneficially related in specific learning situations. For that purpose, we conducted a field study during two ... [more ▼]

The aim of the present study was to examine whether mindfulness and academic emotions are beneficially related in specific learning situations. For that purpose, we conducted a field study during two lecture sessions in which we measured momentary mindfulness and academic emotions of N = 105 university students repeatedly, resulting in N = 551 measurements. As expected, multilevel analyses indicated that students who were more mindful during the lecture felt more positive and less negative activating emotions, better valence, and were more optimistic about an upcoming exam. In contrast to our hypotheses, trait mindfulness was not found to be related to current academic emotions. Multilevel mediation analyses point towards an indirect effect of trait mindfulness via momentary mindfulness during the lecture sessions. These findings suggest that mindfulness is of high relevance to academic emotions which in turn are important for learning, achievement, and well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailCircadian preference as a typology: Latent-class analysis of adolescents' morningness/eveningness, relation with sleep behavior, and with academic outcomes
Preckel, Franzis; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Scherrer, Vsevolod et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2020), 78

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See detailMotivational foundations of self-control and mindfulness and their role in study-leisure conflicts
Grund, Axel UL; Senker, Kerstin

in LEARNING AND INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES (2018), 68

In the present paper, we compared two self-regulatory capacities, trait self-control and mindfulness, with respect to their potential to help students deal with motivational conflicts between studying and ... [more ▼]

In the present paper, we compared two self-regulatory capacities, trait self-control and mindfulness, with respect to their potential to help students deal with motivational conflicts between studying and leisure time, by either promoting a selective, normatively oriented versus open-minded, non-judgmental stance toward conflicting motivations. We also investigated the role of value orientations and need satisfaction is this regard. Study 1 (N = 196) initially showed that trait self-control, but not trait mindfulness, goes along with a preference for achievement-oriented over well-being-oriented values, which might explain the academic benefits associated with self-control. Study 2 (N = 306) replicated the link between value orientations and trait self-control. In line with this motivational pattern, we found context-specific effects for self-control in study leisure conflict scenarios, consolidating academic engagement, but not leisure engagement. Consolidating effects for trait mindfulness were context-transcending and independent from value orientations. Finally, in Study 3 (N = 160), we found evidence that the total effects of trait self-control and mindfulness are differentially mediated via either activity preferences (self-control) or need satisfaction (mindfulness). We discuss motivational interpretations for self-control and mindfulness with respect to the daily juggle between students' academic and leisure-related strivings. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents' beliefs and attitudes toward mathematics across time: A longitudinal examination of the theory of planned behavior
Niepel, Christoph UL; Burrus, Jeremy; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2018), 63

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See detailThe power of vowels: Contributions of vowel, consonant and digit RAN to clinical approaches in reading development
Hornung, Caroline UL; Martin, Romain UL; Fayol, Michel UL

in Learning and Individual Differences (2017), 57

The main purpose of this study was to examine the specific contributions of rapid automatized naming (RAN) measures with different visually presented stimuli (e.g., vowels, consonants, digits) to reading ... [more ▼]

The main purpose of this study was to examine the specific contributions of rapid automatized naming (RAN) measures with different visually presented stimuli (e.g., vowels, consonants, digits) to reading outcomes in first and second grade. Previous studies have shown that RAN is an independent and robust predictor for reading skills in children. Less research investigated the incremental contributions of distinct RAN measures to reading skills in beginning readers. Ninety-three children from kindergarten and first grade completed four different RAN measures involving color, digit, vowel, and consonant naming at the end of the school year. Six months later these children were either in first or in second grade and completed several reading measures. The results emphasize that vowel RAN was a strong and unique predictor for reading accuracy in first grade. Vowel RAN and digit RAN were both significant predictors for reading speed in second grade. The current findings underline that vowel RAN is a promising predictor for reading outcomes (i.e., accuracy and speed) at the beginning of elementary school. RAN performance did however not significantly predict second grade reading comprehension. Results and practical implications will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAssimilation and contrast effects in the formation of problem-solving self-concept
Mustafic, Maida UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Learning and Individual Differences (2017), 54

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See detailNeed for cognition in children and adolescents. Correlates and relations to intelligence and academic performance
Luong, Cäcilia; Strobel, Anja; Wollschläger, Rachel UL et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2017)

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See detailPrediction of Complex Problem Solving and school grades by working memory and ability self-concept
Meißner, Anja; Greiff, Samuel UL; Frischkorn, Gidon T. et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2016), 49

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See detailMotivational profiles in study-leisure conflicts: Quality and quantity of motivation matter
Grund, Axel UL

in Learning and Individual Differences (2013), 26

The effects of the quality and quantity of motivation were compared in relation to students' levels of experienced internal conflict in a specific study-leisure conflict using a person-oriented analysis ... [more ▼]

The effects of the quality and quantity of motivation were compared in relation to students' levels of experienced internal conflict in a specific study-leisure conflict using a person-oriented analysis on self-reports of 336 college students. Latent-profile-analysis identified three motivational profiles for learning and two motivational profiles for leisure. Consistent with a qualitative perspective on motivation, students with Good quality profiles for "reading papers" reported the least internal conflict under the temptation of a social activity. However, in accordance with the quantitative perspective on motivational interference, students with High quantity profiles for learning reported more internal conflict while imagining themselves socializing than students with Good and Poor quality profiles did. Similar effects for the leisure profiles and additional variable-oriented analyses confirmed the assumption that the quality of motivation best explains students' ongoing experience during a focal activity, whereas the effects of indirect motivational costs stemming from the motivational characteristics of missed activities are best described quantitatively. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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