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See detailChildren's Socio-Emotional Skills: Is there a Quantity-Quality Trade-off?
Briole, Simon; Le Forner, Helene; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Labour Economics (2020)

Although it is widely acknowledged that non-cognitive skills matter for adult outcomes, little is known about the role played by family environment in the formation of these skills. We use a longitudinal ... [more ▼]

Although it is widely acknowledged that non-cognitive skills matter for adult outcomes, little is known about the role played by family environment in the formation of these skills. We use a longitudinal survey of children born in the UK in 2000-2001, the Millennium Cohort Study by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies, to estimate the effect of family size on socio-emotional skills, measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. To account for the endogeneity of fertility decisions, we use a well-known instrumental approach that exploits parents' preference for children's gender diversity. We show that the birth of a third child negatively affects the socio-emotional skills of the first two children in a persistent manner. However, we show that this negative effect is entirely driven by girls. We provide evidence that this gender effect is partly driven by an unequal response of parents' time investment in favour of boys and, to a lesser extent, by an unequal demand for household chores. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Norms, Fairness, and Relative Labor Supply Within Households
Fleche, Sarah; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Powdthavee, Nick

in Labour Economics (2020)

Using data in the United States, UK and Germany, we show that women whose working hours exceed those of their male partners report lower life satisfaction on average. By contrast, men do not report lower ... [more ▼]

Using data in the United States, UK and Germany, we show that women whose working hours exceed those of their male partners report lower life satisfaction on average. By contrast, men do not report lower life satisfaction from working more hours than their female partners. An analysis of possible mechanisms shows that in couples where the woman works more hours than the man, women do not spend significantly less time doing household chores. Women with egalitarian ideologies are likely to perceive this unequal division of labour as unfair, ultimately reducing their life satisfaction. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Shorter Workweek and Worker Wellbeing: Evidence from Portugal and France
Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Labour Economics (2019)

Using data from the European Community Household Panel, this paper evaluates the impact of the exogenous reductions in weekly working hours induced by reforms implemented in Portugal and France on worker ... [more ▼]

Using data from the European Community Household Panel, this paper evaluates the impact of the exogenous reductions in weekly working hours induced by reforms implemented in Portugal and France on worker wellbeing. Difference-in-differences estimation results suggest that reduced working hours generated significant and robust increases in job and leisure satisfaction of the workers affected in both countries (from 0.07 to 0.15 standard deviation increases), with the rise in the former mainly being explained by greater satisfaction with working hours and working conditions. Further results suggest that staff representative bodies are important for ensuring that working-time reductions lead to welfare gains. [less ▲]

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See detailUnfairness at Work: Well-Being and Quits
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Clark, Andrew; Barazzetta, Marta UL

in Labour Economics (2018), 51

We here consider the effect of the level of income that individuals consider to be fair for the job they do, which we take as measure of comparison income, on both subjective well-being and objective ... [more ▼]

We here consider the effect of the level of income that individuals consider to be fair for the job they do, which we take as measure of comparison income, on both subjective well-being and objective future job quitting. In six waves of German Socio-Economic Panel data, the extent to which own labour income is perceived to be unfair is significantly negatively correlated with subjective well-being, both in terms of cognitive evaluations (life and job satisfaction) and affect (the frequency of feeling happy, sad and angry). Perceived unfairness also translates into objective labour-market behaviour, with current unfair income predicting future job quits. [less ▲]

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See detailQuit Behavior and the Role of Job Protection
Gielen, Anne; Tatsiramos, Konstantinos UL

in Labour Economics (2012), 19

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See detailEntrepreneurship and Survival Dynamics of Immigrants to the U.S. and their Descendants
Georgarakos, Dimitris; Tatsiramos, Konstantinos UL

in Labour Economics (2009), 16(2), 161-170

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See detailJob turnover, unemployment and labor market institutions
Joseph, Gilles; Pierrard, Olivier; Sneessens, Henri UL

in Labour Economics (2004), 11(4), 451-468

This paper studies the role of labor market institutions on unemployment and on the cyclical properties of job flows. We construct an intertemporal general equilib- rium model with search unemployment and ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the role of labor market institutions on unemployment and on the cyclical properties of job flows. We construct an intertemporal general equilib- rium model with search unemployment and endogenous job turnover, and examine the consequences of introducing an unemployment benefit, a firing cost and a downward wage rigidity. The model is able to reproduce the main cyclical properties of a typical European economy. It also suggests that downward wage rigidities, rather than unem- ployment benefit or firing cost, may well play a dominant role in explaining both the high unemployment rate and the cyclical properties of such an economy. [less ▲]

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