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See detailThe plasma membrane calcium ATPase modulates calcium homeostasis, intracellular signaling events and function in platelets.
Jones, S.; Solomon, A.; Sanz-Rosa, D. et al

in Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (2010), 8(12), 2766-74

BACKGROUND: The plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) regulates localized signaling events in a variety of cell types, although its functional role in platelets remains undefined. OBJECTIVES: To ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) regulates localized signaling events in a variety of cell types, although its functional role in platelets remains undefined. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of PMCA in determining platelet intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2)(+) ](i) ) at rest and following agonist stimulation, and to define the corresponding effects upon different stages of platelet activation. METHODS: [Ca(2)(+) ](i) was continuously measured in Fura-2-loaded platelets and in vitro and in vivo functional analyses performed in the presence of the PMCA inhibitor carboxyeosin (CE). RESULTS: Concentrations of CE that selectively inhibited Ca(2)(+) extrusion through PMCA were established in human platelets. [Ca(2)(+) ](i) was elevated by CE in resting platelets, although collagen-stimulated Ca(2)(+) release was reduced. Impaired Ca(2)(+) mobilization upon agonist stimulation was accompanied by reduced dense granule secretion and impaired platelet aggregation. Platelet aggregation responses were also reduced in PMCA4(-/-) mice and in an in vivo mouse model of platelet thromboembolism. Conversely, inhibition of PMCA promoted the early and later stages of platelet activation, observed as enhanced adhesion to fibrinogen, and accelerated clot retraction. Investigations into the signaling mechanisms underlying CE-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation implicated cGMP-independent vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Disruption of PMCA activity perturbs platelet Ca(2)(+) homeostasis and function in a time-dependent manner, demonstrating that PMCA differentially regulates Ca(2)(+) -dependent signaling events, and hence function, throughout the platelet activation process. [less ▲]

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See detailOverexpression of the partially activated alpha(IIb)beta3D723H integrin salt bridge mutant downregulates RhoA activity and induces microtubule-dependent proplatelet-like extensions in Chinese hamster ovary cells
Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth UL; Salsmann, Alexandre UL; Debili, Najet et al

in Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (2009), 7(7), 1207-1217

BACKGROUND: We have recently reported a novel mutation in the beta3 subunit of the platelet fibrinogen receptor (alpha(IIb)beta3D723H) identified in a patient with dominantly inherited ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We have recently reported a novel mutation in the beta3 subunit of the platelet fibrinogen receptor (alpha(IIb)beta3D723H) identified in a patient with dominantly inherited macrothrombocytopenia, and we have shown that this mutation promotes a new phenotype in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, characterized by fibrinogen-dependent, microtubule-driven proplatelet-like cell extensions. RESULTS: Here we demonstrate that the partially activated alpha(IIb)beta3D723H or alpha(IIb)beta3D723A salt bridge mutants, but not fully activated alpha(IIb)beta3 mutants, cause this phenotype. Time-lapse videomicroscopy clearly differentiated these stable microtubule-driven and nocodazole-sensitive extensions from common dynamic actin-driven pseudopodia. In addition, overexpression of a mitochondrial marker confirmed their functional role in organelle transport. Comparative immunofluorescence analysis of the subcellular localization of alpha(IIb)beta3, the focal adhesion proteins talin or vinculin and actin revealed a similar membrane labeling of CHO cell extensions and CD34+-derived megakaryocyte proplatelets. Mutant alpha(IIb)beta3D723H signaling was independent of Src, protein kinase C or phosphoinositide 3-kinase, but correlated with decreased RhoA activity as compared with wild-type alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling, reminiscent of integrin signaling during neurite outgrowth. Accordingly, overexpression of constitutively active RhoA in CHO alpha(IIb)beta3D723H cells prevented protrusion formation on fibrinogen. Most interestingly, RhoA/ROCK inhibition was necessary, but not sufficient, and integrin activity was additionally required to induce CHO cell extension formation. CONCLUSIONS: CHO alpha(IIb)beta3D723H cell protrusions and megakaryocyte proplatelets, like neuronal cell neurites, result from a common integrin-dependent signaling pathway, promoting strongly decreased RhoA activity and leading to microtubule-driven formation of cytoplasmic extensions. [less ▲]

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