References of "Journal of International Economics"
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See detailThe welfare impact of global migration in OECD countries
Burzynski, Michal UL; Docquier, Frederic; Aubry, Amandine

in Journal of International Economics (2016), 101

This paper quantifies the effect of global migration on the welfare of non-migrant OECD citizens. We develop an integrated, multi-country model that accounts for the interactions between the labor market ... [more ▼]

This paper quantifies the effect of global migration on the welfare of non-migrant OECD citizens. We develop an integrated, multi-country model that accounts for the interactions between the labor market, fiscal, and market size effects of migration, as well as for trade relations between countries. The model is calibrated to match the economic and demographic characteristics of the 34 OECD countries and the rest of the world, as well as trade flows between them in the year 2010. We show that recent migration flows have been beneficial for 69% of the non-migrant OECD population, and for 83% of non-migrant citizens of the 22 richest OECD countries. Winners are mainly residing in traditional immigration countries; their gains are substantial and are essentially due to the entry of immigrants from non-OECD countries. Although labor market and fiscal effects are non-negligible in some countries, the greatest source of gain comes from the market size effect, i.e. the change in the variety of goods available to consumers. [less ▲]

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See detailOn tax competition, public goods provision and jurisdictions' size
Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL

in Journal of International Economics (2011), 84(1), 124-130

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See detailTransportation, freight rates, and economic geography
Behrens, Kristian; Picard, Pierre M. UL

in Journal of International Economics (2011), 85(2), 280-291

We investigate the role of competitive transport markets in shaping the location of economic activity and the pattern of trade. In our model, carriers supply transport services for shipping manufactured ... [more ▼]

We investigate the role of competitive transport markets in shaping the location of economic activity and the pattern of trade. In our model, carriers supply transport services for shipping manufactured goods, and freight rates are set to clear transport markets. Each carrier must commit to the maximum capacity for a round-trip and thus faces a logistics problem as there are opportunity costs of returning empty. These costs increase the freight rates charged to firms located in regions that are net exporters of manufactured goods. Since demand for transport services depends on the spatial distribution of economic activity, the concentration of production in one region raises freight rates to serve foreign markets from there, thus working against specialization and the agglomeration of firms. Consequently, a more even spatial distribution of firms and production prevails at equilibrium when freight rates are endogenously determined than when they are assumed to be exogenous as in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailThe spatial selection of heterogeneous firms
Okubo, Toshihiro; Picard, Pierre M. UL; Thisse, Jacques-François

in Journal of International Economics (2010), 82(2), 230-237

Empirical research on strategic alliances has focused on the idea that alliance partners are selected on the basis of social capital considerations. In this paper we emphasize instead the role of ... [more ▼]

Empirical research on strategic alliances has focused on the idea that alliance partners are selected on the basis of social capital considerations. In this paper we emphasize instead the role of complementary knowledge stocks (broadly defined) in partner selection, arguing not only that knowledge complementarity should not be overlooked, but that it may be the true causal force behind alliance formation. To marshal evidence on this point, we design a simple model of partner selection in which firms ally for the purpose of learning and innovating, and in doing so create an industry network. We abstract completely from network-based structural and strategic motives for partner selection and focus instead on the idea that firms’ knowledge bases must “fit” in order for joint leaning and innovation to be possible, and thus for an alliance to be feasible. The striking result is that while containing no social capital considerations, this simple model replicates the firm conduct, network structure, and contingent effects of network position on performance observed and discussed in the empirical literature. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain Drain, Remittances, and Fertility
Marchiori, Luca; Pieretti, Patrice UL; Zou, Benteng UL

in Journal of International Economics (2008)

This paper analyzes the effects of skilled migration and remittances on fertility decisions at origin. We develop an overlapping generations model which accounts for endogenous fertility and education ... [more ▼]

This paper analyzes the effects of skilled migration and remittances on fertility decisions at origin. We develop an overlapping generations model which accounts for endogenous fertility and education. Parents choose the number of children they want to raise and decide upon how many children obtain higher education. Only high skilled individuals migrate with a certain probability and remit to their parents. We find that an increase in the probability to emigrate leads both high and low skilled parents to send more children to obtain higher education. However the effect on the number of children is ambiguous. In a further analysis, we calibrate the model to match different characteristics of a developing economy. When the destination country relaxes the immigration restrictions, more high skilled individuals leave the origin country. The result is that, at origin, increased high skilled emigration reduces fertility and fosters human capital accumulation. [less ▲]

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