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See detailEnzyme complexity in intermediary metabolism.
Van Schaftingen, Emile; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Linster, Carole UL

in Journal of inherited metabolic disease (2015), 38(4), 721-7

A good appraisal of the function of enzymes is essential for the understanding of inborn errors of metabolism. However, it is clear now that the 'one gene, one enzyme, one catalytic function' rule ... [more ▼]

A good appraisal of the function of enzymes is essential for the understanding of inborn errors of metabolism. However, it is clear now that the 'one gene, one enzyme, one catalytic function' rule oversimplifies the actual situation. Genes often encode several related proteins, which may differ in their subcellular localisation, regulation or function. Furthermore, enzymes often show several catalytic activities. In some cases, this is because they are multifunctional, possessing two or more different active sites that catalyse different, physiologically related reactions. In enzymes with broad specificity or in multispecificity enzymes, a single type of catalytic site performs the same reaction on different physiological substrates at similar rates. Enzymes that act physiologically in only one reaction often show nonetheless substrate promiscuity: they act at low rates on compounds that resemble their physiological substrate(s), thus forming non-classical metabolites, which are in some cases eliminated by metabolite repair. In addition to their catalytic role, enzymes may have moonlighting functions, i.e. non-catalytic functions that are most often not related with their catalytic activity. Deficiency in such functions may participate in the phenotype of inborn errors of metabolism. Evolution has also made that some enzymes have lost their catalytic activity to become allosteric proteins. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolite proofreading, a neglected aspect of intermediary metabolism
Van Schaftingen, E.; Rzem, R.; Marbaix, A. et al

in Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease (2013), 36(3), 427-34

Enzymes of intermediary metabolism are less specific than what is usually assumed: they often act on metabolites that are not their 'true' substrate, making abnormal metabolites that may be deleterious if ... [more ▼]

Enzymes of intermediary metabolism are less specific than what is usually assumed: they often act on metabolites that are not their 'true' substrate, making abnormal metabolites that may be deleterious if they accumulate. Some of these abnormal metabolites are reconverted to normal metabolites by repair enzymes, which play therefore a role akin to the proofreading activities of DNA polymerases and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. An illustrative example of such repair enzymes is L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase, which eliminates a metabolite abnormally made by a Krebs cycle enzyme. Mutations in L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase lead to L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria, a leukoencephalopathy. Other examples are the epimerase and the ATP-dependent dehydratase that repair hydrated forms of NADH and NADPH; ethylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase, which eliminates an abnormal metabolite formed by acetyl-CoA carboxylase, an enzyme of fatty acid synthesis; L-pipecolate oxidase, which repairs a metabolite formed by a side activity of an enzyme of L-proline biosynthesis. Metabolite proofreading enzymes are likely quite common, but most of them are still unidentified. A defect in these enzymes may account for new metabolic disorders. [less ▲]

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