References of "Journal of English for Academic Purposes"
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See detailThe representativeness of lecture listening coursebooks: language, lectures, research-informedness
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2018), 34

This paper examines 25 lecture listening coursebooks for their representativeness of ‘real’ lectures with a view to helping EAP practitioners make informed decisions about materials selection and ... [more ▼]

This paper examines 25 lecture listening coursebooks for their representativeness of ‘real’ lectures with a view to helping EAP practitioners make informed decisions about materials selection and development. The aspects of representativeness examined are language, lecture authenticity and research-informedness. The representativeness of language was assessed by comparing signposts of important points with those retrieved from a corpus of 160 authentic lectures. Lecture authenticity in terms of source, delivery and length was established by examining the audiovisual materials, transcripts and information provided by authors. Whether materials were research-informed was determined by noting references to lecture and listening research. Results suggest that current lecture listening materials tend not to reflect the language and lectures students are likely to encounter on their degree programmes. Moreover, materials are typically not (systematically) informed by listening and lecture discourse research. These findings highlight the need for EAP practitioners to approach published materials critically and supplement or modify them in ways that would better serve students. The paper concludes with recommendations on how this could be done. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is ...: The discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures.
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2012), 11(2), 112-124

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic ... [more ▼]

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus. Like much linguistic research on this academic genre, the investigation is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of language use in lectures to aid effective English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course design. To this end, the composition of the wh-clauses was analysed for its main constituents (subjects, verb phrases and modality) and the clefts were grouped according to their apparent main function and subfunction within the lecture discourse. The results show that basic wh-clefts mostly serve to highlight aspects of content information and there was also disciplinary variation in their use. Implications for EAP course design are discussed. [less ▲]

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