References of "Journal of Educational Psychology"
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See detailSeeing is believing: Gender diversity in STEM is related to mathematics self-concept
Niepel, Christoph UL; Stadler, Matthias UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Journal of Educational Psychology (in press)

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See detailNegative life events, self-efficacy, and social support: Risk and protective factors for school dropout intentions and dropout
Samuel, Robin UL; Burger, Kaspar

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2019)

Prior studies have noted several risk and protective factors for school dropout; however, only a few have examined longer-term vulnerabilities alongside temporary risk and protective factors. Consequently ... [more ▼]

Prior studies have noted several risk and protective factors for school dropout; however, only a few have examined longer-term vulnerabilities alongside temporary risk and protective factors. Consequently, we focused on the role that both stable and time-varying psychosocial risk and protective factors play in dropout intentions and actual dropout, using a 4-year longitudinal design. We investigated to what extent dropout intentions and dropout can be predicted by an interplay between negative life events, general self-efficacy, and perceived social support. We distinguished between time-averaged levels of self-efficacy and social support, and within-person change in self-efficacy and social support over time. This enabled us to establish whether dropout intentions and dropout were sensitive to fluctuations in perceived self-efficacy and social support over time when controlling for person-specific levels of these psychosocial resources. Calculating multilevel models with data from a prospective cohort study (N = 4,956, 43 male), we found that negative life events were significantly associated with an increase in dropout intentions and the likelihood of school dropout. Furthermore, time-averaged levels of self-efficacy and social support, and a within-person (situational) increase in these characteristics relative to their time-averaged levels, were related to lower levels of dropout intentions but did not prevent dropout. The positive relationship between negative life events and dropout intentions was attenuated for individuals who perceived higher levels of self-efficacy than usual. Our findings suggest future research should further investigate time-averaged and situational psychosocial drivers of school dropout in combination. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved) [less ▲]

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See detailIndividual differences in complex problem solving skills. How they evolve and what they imply.
Wüstenberg, Sascha; Greiff, Samuel UL; Vainikainen, Mari-Pauliina et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2016), 108(7), 1028-1044

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See detailEditorial to the special section Computer-based assessment of cross-curricular skills and processes.
Greiff, Samuel UL; Martin, Romain UL; Spinath, Birgit

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2014), 106

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See detailDifferential relations between facets of complex problem solving and students’ immigration background
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2014), Advance online publication

Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students’ cultural background ... [more ▼]

Whereas the assessment of complex problem solving (CPS) has received increasing attention in the context of international large-scale assessments, its fairness in regard to students’ cultural background has gone largely unexplored. On the basis of a student sample of ninth-graders (N = 299), including a representative number of immigrant students (N = 127), the present study evaluated (1) whether CPS can be assessed fairly among students with or without immigration background and (2) whether achievement differences between these groups exist. Results showed that fair assessment of CPS is possible using the Genetics Lab, a computer-based microworld that incorporates game-like characteristics and multilingual-friendly features. Immigrant students were generally outperformed by their non-immigrant peers, but performance differences can largely be explained by differential enrollment in lower academic tracks. Interestingly, CPS scales were less affected by students’ educational background than a traditional paper-pencil-based reasoning scale. Moreover, a fine-grained analysis of different facets of CPS showed that irrespective of the academic track, immigrant students demonstrated a more efficient task exploration behavior than their native peers (d = .26). In sum, this might point to the potential of computer-based assessment of CPS to identify otherwise hidden cognitive potential in immigrant students. [less ▲]

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See detailComputer-based assessment of cross-curricular skills and processes. Special section.
Greiff, Samuel UL; Martin, Romain UL; Spinath, Birgit

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2014)

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See detailComplex Problem Solving in educational settings – something beyond g: Concept, assessment, measurement invariance, and construct validity
Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL; Molnar, Gyöngyvér et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2013), 105

Innovative assessments of cross-curricular competencies such as complex problem solving (CPS) have currently received considerable attention in large-scale educational studies. This study investigated the ... [more ▼]

Innovative assessments of cross-curricular competencies such as complex problem solving (CPS) have currently received considerable attention in large-scale educational studies. This study investigated the nature of CPS by applying a state-of-the-art approach to assess CPS in high school. We analyzed whether two processes derived from cognitive psychology, knowledge acquisition and knowledge application, could be measured equally well across grades and how these processes differed between grades. Further, relations between CPS, general mental ability (g), academic achievement, and parental education were explored. Hungarian high school students in Grades 5 to 11 (N 855) completed MicroDYN, which is a computer-based CPS test, and the Culture Fair Test 20-R as a measure of g. Results based on structural equation models showed that empirical modeling of CPS was in line with theories from cognitive psychology such that the two dimensions identified above were found in all grades, and that there was some development of CPS in school, although the Grade 9 students deviated from the general pattern of development. Finally, path analysis showed that CPS was a relevant predictor of academic achievement over and above g. Overall, results of the current study provide support for an understanding of CPS as a cross-curricular skill that is accessible through computer-based assessment and that yields substantial relations to school performance. Thus, the increasing attention CPS has currently received on an international level seems warranted given its high relevance for educational psychologists. [less ▲]

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See detailExecutive and phonological processes in second language acquisition
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole, S. E.

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2012), 104(4), 974-986

This paper reports a latent variable study exploring the specific links between executive processes of working memory, phonological short-term memory, phonological awareness, and proficiency in first (L1 ... [more ▼]

This paper reports a latent variable study exploring the specific links between executive processes of working memory, phonological short-term memory, phonological awareness, and proficiency in first (L1), second (L2), and third (L3) languages in 8- to 9-year-olds experiencing multilingual edu-cation. Children completed multiple L1-measures of complex span, verbal short-term storage, and phonological awareness, and tests of proficiency in a range of linguistic domains (vocabulary, grammar, and literacy) in Luxembourgish (L1), German (familiar L2) and French (unfamiliar L3). Results indicate that executive processing abilities, phonological short-term memory, and phono-logical awareness operate as distinct but related constructs that manifest differential associations with native and second language proficiency in multilingual children: Phonological short-term memory was uniquely linked to vocabulary in L1 and the structurally similar L2; executive pro-cesses were related to grammar across languages, reading comprehension, and spelling; and phono-logical awareness made specific contributions to word decoding, spelling, and language proficiency in the structurally dissimilar L3. Phonological processing abilities appear to be critical for acquiring the sound structure of a new language, whereas executive processes share more general links with higher-order linguistic abilities in second language learners. [less ▲]

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See detailThe structure of academic self-concepts revisited: The nested Marsh/Shavelson model
Brunner, Martin UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Dierendonck, Christophe UL et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2010), 102(4), 964-981

Detailed reference viewed: 368 (28 UL)