References of "Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization"
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See detailTesting market regulations in experimental asset markets –The case of margin purchases
Neugebauer, Tibor UL; Füllbrunn, Sascha

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2021)

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See detailBoys don't cry (or do the dishes): Family size and the housework gender gap
Menta, Giorgia UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2021), 186

We here use data from the British Cohort Study (BCS) to link family size to age-16 children’s contribution to household chores and the adult housework gender gap. Assuming that home production is an ... [more ▼]

We here use data from the British Cohort Study (BCS) to link family size to age-16 children’s contribution to household chores and the adult housework gender gap. Assuming that home production is an increasing function of family size and using an instrument to account for the endogeneity of fertility, we show that larger families have a different effect on boys and girls at age 16: girls in large families are significantly more likely to contribute to housework, with no effect for boys. We then show that childhood family size affects the housework gender gap between the cohort members and their partners at age 34. Women who grew up in larger families are more likely to carry out a greater share of household tasks in adulthood, as compared to women from smaller families. In addition, growing up in a large family makes cohort members more likely to sort into households with a wider housework gender gap as adults. We show that the persistent effect of family size is due to the adoption of behaviours in line with traditional gender roles: a lower likelihood of employment and shorter commutes for women, along with a higher employment probability for their partners. [less ▲]

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See detailJob Quality and Workplace Gender Diversity in Europe
Clark, Andrew; d'ambrosio, Conchita UL; Zhu, Rong

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2021), 183

We here consider the relationship between workplace gender measures and employees’ perceived job quality, where the former cover both the gender mix of workers with the same job title and the gender of ... [more ▼]

We here consider the relationship between workplace gender measures and employees’ perceived job quality, where the former cover both the gender mix of workers with the same job title and the gender of the immediate boss. Data from the 2015 European Working Conditions Survey show that men’s job evaluation is higher in gender-balanced job positions at the workplace, while that of women is higher in either gender-balanced or male-dominated positions. The gender of the immediate boss plays no significant role in employee job evaluation. There is some evidence that these correlations differ by job-quality domains. We introduce co-worker support and help, gender discrimination, and unwanted sexual attention as possible mediators of the gender-mix correlations: these change the estimated coefficients only little. Our estimated correlations could therefore reflect a pure preference for job-position gender composition. Last, we use a bounding approach to show that our main results are robust to the potential influence of unobservables. Overall, job-position gender diversity is associated with higher worker well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailWelfare-Based Income Insecurity in the US and Germany: Evidence from Harmonized Panel Data
d'ambrosio, Conchita UL; Rohde, Nicholas; Tang, Kam Ki et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2020), 176

This paper develops normative approaches for measuring individual-level income insecurity. Using concepts derived from Expected Utility Theory and Prospect Theory, we build a suite of measures designed to ... [more ▼]

This paper develops normative approaches for measuring individual-level income insecurity. Using concepts derived from Expected Utility Theory and Prospect Theory, we build a suite of measures designed to capture various facets of psychologically distressing income risk. We present an application for the US and Germany from 1993-2013, employing conditionally heteroskedastic fixed-effects models to generate predictive densities for future incomes. Our results reveal much higher levels of income risk in the US relative to Germany, which can be mostly attributed to a higher level of autonomous, time-invariant volatility. State-by-state variations in liberal/conservative political administrations partially explain our results, and we find some evidence that trade exposure is a contributing factor in the US. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Causes and Consequences of Early-Adult Unemployment: Evidence from Cohort Data
Clark, Andrew UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2019)

We here use the employment-history data from the British Cohort Study to calculate an individual’s total experience of unemployment from the time they left education up to age 30. We show that ... [more ▼]

We here use the employment-history data from the British Cohort Study to calculate an individual’s total experience of unemployment from the time they left education up to age 30. We show that, conditional on current unemployment, this experience is negatively correlated with the life satisfaction that the individual reports at age 30, so that past unemployment scars. We also identify the childhood circumstances and family background that predict this adult unemployment experience. Educational achievement and good behaviour at age 16 both reduce adult unemployment experience, and emotional health at age 16 is a particularly strong predictor of unemployment experience for women. Both boys and girls reproduce on average their parents’ unemployment, so that adult unemployment experience is transmitted between generations. We uncover evidence of a social-norm effect: children from less-advantaged backgrounds both experience more adult unemployment but are less affected by it in well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental Stock Market Dynamics: Excess bids, directional learning, and adaptive style-investing in a call-auction with multiple multi-period lived assets
Neugebauer, Tibor UL; Reinhard, Selten

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2019), (157), 209-224

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See detailUnintended triadic closure in social networks: The strategic formation of research collaborations between French inventors.
Carayol, Nicolas; Berge, Laurent UL; Cassi, Lorenzo et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2019), 163

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See detailModifier words in the financial press and investor expectations
Kräussl, Roman UL; Bosman, Ronald; Mirgorodskaya, Elizaveta

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2017), 138

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See detailDirecting remittances to education with soft and hard commitments: Evidence from a lab-in-the-field experiment and new product take-up among Filipino migrants in Rome
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; De Arcangelis, Giuseppe; McKenzie, David et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2015), 111

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab ... [more ▼]

This paper tests how migrants’ willingness to remit changes when given the ability to direct remittances to educational purposes using different forms of commitment. Variants of a dictator game in a lab-in-the-field experiment with Filipino migrants in Rome are used to examine remitting behavior under varying degrees of commitment. These range from the soft commitment of simply labeling remittances as being for education, to the hard commitment of having funds directly paid to a school and the student’s educational performance monitored. We find that the introduction of simple labeling for education raises remittances by more than 15%. Adding the ability to directly send this funding to the school adds only a further 2.2%. We randomly vary the information asymmetry between migrants and their most closely connected household, but find no significant change in the remittance response to these forms of commitment as information varies. Behavior in these games is then shown to be predictive of take-up of a new financial product called EduPay, designed to allow migrants to directly pay remittances to schools in the Philippines. We find this take-up is largely driven by a response to the ability to label remittances for education, rather than to the hard commitment feature of directly paying schools. [less ▲]

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See detailExcludability: A laboratory study on forced ranking in team production
Neugebauer, Tibor UL; Croson, Rachel; Fatas, Enrique et al

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2015), 114

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See detailImitation and Efficient Contagion
Boyer, Tristan; Jonard, Nicolas UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2014), 100

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See detailCorporate Governance and Employee Power in the Boardroom – An Applied Game Theoretic Analysis
Balsmeier, Benjamin UL; Bermig, Andreas; Dilger, Alexander

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2013), 91

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See detailA Theory of BOT concession contracts
Auriol, Emmanuelle UL; Picard, Pierre M. UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2013), 89

In this paper, we discuss the choice for build-operate-and-transfer (BOT) concessions when governments and Örm managers do not share the same information regarding the operation characteristics of a ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we discuss the choice for build-operate-and-transfer (BOT) concessions when governments and Örm managers do not share the same information regarding the operation characteristics of a facility. We show that larger shadow costs of public funds and larger information asymmetries entice governments to choose BOT concessions. This result stems from a trade-o§ between the governmentís shadow costs of Önancing the construction and the operation of the facility and the excessive usage price that the consumer may face during the concession period. The incentives to choose BOT concessions increase as a function of informational asymmetries between governments and potential BOT concession holders and with the possibility of transferring the concession project characteristics to the public authority at the termination of the concession. [less ▲]

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See detailCorporate Science in the Patent System: An Analysis of the Semiconductor Technology
Della Malva, Antonio; Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2012)

Corporate scientific publications are often presented as a strategic means for firms to create prior art with the objective to prevent others from patenting related inventions. This presumes that ... [more ▼]

Corporate scientific publications are often presented as a strategic means for firms to create prior art with the objective to prevent others from patenting related inventions. This presumes that corporate publications enter the pool of prior art which is relevant to judge the novelty of patent applications at the patent office and that corporate science has the power to block patent applications. This paper analyses for the first time whether the presumed mechanism behind corporate publications as a means to preempt patents works. With a focus on the semiconductor technology, our results show that scientific publications by corporations challenge the novelty of patent applications at the European Patent Office (EPO) significantly more than other pieces of prior art. Detailed information from the EPO patent examination procedure allows us to show that corporate publications threaten the novelty of patent applications if combined with other pieces of prior art like patents rather than as standalone documents. This supports the claim that corporate scientific publishing can be an effective means for firms to protect their freedom to operate if used as a complementary part of a firm’s overall IP protection strategy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (6 UL)
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See detailMerit, Approbation and the Evolution of Social Structure
Jonard, Nicolas UL; Cowan, Robin

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2007), 64(3-4), 295-315

In this paper we study a society in which individuals gain utility from income and from social approbation. Income is correlated with class. Approbation is given to an unobservable trait, which must be ... [more ▼]

In this paper we study a society in which individuals gain utility from income and from social approbation. Income is correlated with class. Approbation is given to an unobservable trait, which must be signalled through the agent’s social mobility, i.e. class change. Mobility is driven by a simple mechanism involving inheritance, effort and ability. Thus social structure (class composition) is affected by individuals’ quest for approbation, and we study how that affects the emergence and multiplicity of long run social organizations, including hybrid forms of dynasties and meritocracies. Specifically we observe that even though social mobility is driven purely by a meritocratic mechanism, pure dynasties can emerge. We then introduce a feedback between the size of the upper class and its income value, so that effort levels and social structure are jointly endogenous. We derive results on equilibrium effort levels and stationary (when they exist) social structures. Social organization can converge to a unique steady state, multiple long run equilibria or cycles. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 109 (11 UL)