References of "International Journal of Multilingualism"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOrthographic competence among multilingual school children: writing Moroccan Arabic in France
Weth, Constanze UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2015), 12(2), 196-209

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultilingual practices of university students and changing forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2014), 11(1), 62-75

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this ... [more ▼]

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this multilingualism is now changing, due to the rising proportion of migrants in the country, who now make up 43% of the resident population. The changing demographic profile of Luxembourg is reflected in a diversification of language practices within this already highly multilingual context. This article focuses on one group of people who exemplify these changes, 24 students of diverse national and language backgrounds at the University of Luxembourg. Using data from a language diaries exercise conducted as part of an introductory course on multilingualism, we examine the reported multilingual practices of the students and consider what these language practices reveal about traditional and newer forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailStruggling with the languages of the 'legitimate market' and the 'islets of liberty' (Bourdieu). A case study of pupils with immigrational background in the trilingual school-system of Luxembourg
Maurer-Hetto, Marie-Paule UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2009), 6(1), 68-84

Two Portuguese children of immigrants were observed over a period of two years within the complex sociolinguistic context of the Luxembourgish multilingual school-system. The data allow the analysis of ... [more ▼]

Two Portuguese children of immigrants were observed over a period of two years within the complex sociolinguistic context of the Luxembourgish multilingual school-system. The data allow the analysis of their relations with the languages they learn at school: Luxembourgish, German, French and Portuguese. The observations focus on the two pupils struggling with the languages of the ‘legitimate market’ and the ‘islets of liberty’ (Bourdieu). Their different strategies lead to opposite results: one manages to cope with the system, the other borders on failure. The theoretical frame of the study is based on socio-cultural theory (Vygotsky, 1962), enhanced by the demands of a multilingual school. The study relies on a qualitative, ethnographically oriented methodology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailYoung children learning new languages out of school.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2006), 3(4), 258-279

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six eight-year-old Luxembourgish children use and learn German, French and English in formal and informal settings over a period of one year. Their eagerness to learn and use German and English contrasted with their cautious and formal approach to the learning of French. My findings demonstrate that second language learning in a multilingual country is not an ‘automatic’ or ‘natural’ process but, rather, children’s language behaviour depends on their personal goals, interests, competence, confidence and understanding of what counts as appropriate language use. These factors are influenced by the formal approach to language learning at school. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (5 UL)