References of "Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science"
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See detailGerontagogy Toward Intergenerationality: Dialogical Learning Between Children and Elders
Boulanger, Dany; Albert, Isabelle UL; Marsico, Giuseppina

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2020), 54

This paper aims at overcoming the following limits of gerontagogy –particularly with regard to Lemieux’s model: referencing chronological age; delimitating elders’ learning in reference to traits (styles ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at overcoming the following limits of gerontagogy –particularly with regard to Lemieux’s model: referencing chronological age; delimitating elders’ learning in reference to traits (styles, needs, behaviors, etc.) in contrast to children’s learning; overlooking the aging aspect. To do so, we propose to integrate aging and intergenerationality into gerontagogy from a sociocultural, dialogical and historical approach. This establishes the basis for an intergenerational and dialogical approach to elders’ learning. [less ▲]

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See detail“I Feel More Luxembourgish, but Portuguese Too” Cultural Identities in a Multicultural Society
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2020), 54

The present investigation focused on cultural identity and the dealing with the belonging to different cultural frames as a migrant in a highly culturally diverse context by comparing two generations of ... [more ▼]

The present investigation focused on cultural identity and the dealing with the belonging to different cultural frames as a migrant in a highly culturally diverse context by comparing two generations of Portuguese families living in Luxembourg. Quantitative standardized questionnaires complemented by in-depth qualitative interviews with parent-child dyads were used in order to assess possible (dis)similarities between first generation Portuguese immigrant parents and their adult children (i.e. second generation) concerning their cultural identities. Generational differences were found regarding the dealing with several cultural frames, language competences and attachment to both discussed cultures. Adult children were more prone to find themselves in a “compatible” identity orientation, compared to the parental generation. Yet, when focussing specifically on the second generation, qualitative data highlighted some issues regarding the perceived views of others on one’s own cultural belonging and the perception of a certain sense of cultural identity denial from others. Our findings contribute to the existing theoretical literature on cultural identity by elucidating some major differences between immigrant parents and their adult children on how they enact the sense of belonging and the dealing with multiple cultural frames on a daily-life basis. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychologists and neoliberal school reforms: Multi-faceted problems calling for multi-faceted interventions
Boll, Thomas UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2018), 52(3), 425-437

This paper extends on six aspects of an article on neoliberal school reforms, their possible influences on schools and school psychologists, and options for dealing with these challenges (Szulevicz ... [more ▼]

This paper extends on six aspects of an article on neoliberal school reforms, their possible influences on schools and school psychologists, and options for dealing with these challenges (Szulevicz, Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Sciences 2018). First, the reductions implied in the neoliberal view of the student as homo economicus and of an ideal student as self-regulated learner are described and alternative views of the student as a person (e.g., homo moralis) and of the ideal student (e.g., as intentional self-developer) are presented. Secondly, several promoting and inhibiting influences on neoliberal school reforms are discussed: competence-based school education, output-oriented school governance, and standardized school performance testing on the one hand, and critical discourses about these phenomena on the other. Third, attention is directed towards impending disadvantages of the aforementioned reforms (e.g., insufficient preparation of students for the fullness of life). Fourth, goals for interventions are discussed (e.g., reducing neoliberal influences on schools, creating an awareness of the disadvantages of neoliberal reforms, forming coalitions to promote alternatives to these reforms). Fifth, some intervention approaches for reaching these goals are considered with special emphasis on different system levels and stakeholders at which these interventions may be targeted (e.g., education policy makers, teachers and parents associations). Sixth, evaluations of the interventions are called for to monitor their effects and to refine the guiding goals, problem analyses, and strategies. In closing, some transferable principles of the preceding approach are highlighted that could be used to better understand and manage other educational problems as well. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneralizing from Case Studies: A Commentary
de Saint-Georges, Ingrid UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2018)

This commentary responds to the articles assembled for the thematic issue Self-identity on the move: methodological elaborations (IPBS, 51 (2), June 2017). The issue points in two directions. Firstly, the ... [more ▼]

This commentary responds to the articles assembled for the thematic issue Self-identity on the move: methodological elaborations (IPBS, 51 (2), June 2017). The issue points in two directions. Firstly, the articles investigate the way individual self-identity develops in changing social and cultural environments, specifically in the contexts of family, youth and migration. Secondly, the special issue is also interested in methodological elaboration, more specifically the question of how one can generalize from individual case studies, especially when looking at complex, multiscale, semiotic processes. This commentary particularly addresses the second point and uses the various cases in this issue (i) to better understand something of the larger intellectual debate around the question of 'generalizing from case studies', and (ii) to reflect on writing as a tool for indexing generalization. The commentary highlights five textual moves the authors use to make their findings relevant beyond the specifics of the local study. [less ▲]

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See detailIDENTITY AND ITS CONSTRUAL: LEARNING FROM LUXEMBOURG
Murdock, Elke UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2017)

This article examines national identity construal processes within the case study context of Luxembourg. Building on research highlighting the modalities of generalization from case studies, I present the ... [more ▼]

This article examines national identity construal processes within the case study context of Luxembourg. Building on research highlighting the modalities of generalization from case studies, I present the country case that is Luxembourg. This social universe has a foreign population percentage of 47% and what is considered majority and minority becomes increasingly fluid. The migration process itself is fluid, ranging from daily migration, to medium-term stays, return visits and permanent immigration including uptake of citizenship. Within such a fluid environment, where national borders are permeable at the physical level of crossing borders and (national) societies are nested within societies, culture contact is a permanent feature in daily life. Nationality becomes a salient feature as culture contact tends to prompt reflection, resulting in questioning and (re-)negotiation of national identity. This affects the native population as well as the diverse immigrant population – with diversity going beyond the level of country of origin. Many individuals are also of mixed nationality and some examples for the construal process of national identity will be provided, illustrating how national identity is negotiated at individual level. Like a periscope, this country let s us adjust mirrors, permitting us to observe modes of identity construal which would otherwise be obstructed from the field of view. The case study that is Luxembourg allows us to look at the micro-setting of the construction, potentially of something new. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Family in us: Family history, family identity and self-reproductive adaptive behavior
Ferring, Dieter UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2017), 51

This contribution is an essay about the notion of family identity reflecting shared significant experiences within a family system originating a set of signs used in social communication within and ... [more ▼]

This contribution is an essay about the notion of family identity reflecting shared significant experiences within a family system originating a set of signs used in social communication within and between families. Significant experiences are considered as experiences of events that have an immediate impact on the adaptation of the family in a given socio-ecological and cultural context at a given historical time. It is assumed that family history is stored in a shared “family memory” holding both implicit and explicit knowledge and exerting an influence on the behavior of each family member. This is described as transgenerational family memory being constituted of a system of meaningful signs. The crucial dimension underlying the logic of this essay are the ideas of adaptation as well as self-reproduction of systems. [less ▲]

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See detailFamily cultures in the context of migration and ageing
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2017), 51(2), 205-222

Intergenerational family relations are embedded in family cultures which influence how families regulate their relations over the whole life span with regard to key issues, such as autonomy and ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational family relations are embedded in family cultures which influence how families regulate their relations over the whole life span with regard to key issues, such as autonomy and relatedness, or support exchange and reciprocity, and which may vary inter- and intraculturally. Migrant families undoubtedly face a special situation as values and expectations from the culture of origin and from the host cultural context might differ. Not much is known yet about how migrant families adapt their family cultures to the host cultural context. The present article will focus on aspects of intergenerational family regulation by taking into account family cultures of migrant compared to non-migrant families in a life span perspective. We will illustrate our theoretical outline by presenting first results from the IRMA-study comparing Luxembourgish and Portuguese immigrant families living in Luxembourg. We focus on issues of family cohesion, enmeshment and normative expectations regarding adult children’s support for their ageing parents, by drawing both on quantitative questionnaire as well as qualitative interview data. Implications for the experience of ambivalence and conflicts as well as well-being of family members from both generations will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAggregation, Validation, and Generalization of Qualitative Data - Methodological and Practical Research Strategies Illustrated by the Research Process of an empirically Based Typology
Weis, Daniel UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2016)

The article deals with the question of how aggregated data which allow for generalizable insights can be generated from single-case based qualitative investigations. Thereby, two central challenges of ... [more ▼]

The article deals with the question of how aggregated data which allow for generalizable insights can be generated from single-case based qualitative investigations. Thereby, two central challenges of qualitative social research are outlined: First, researchers must ensure that the single-case data can be aggregated and condensed so that new collective structures can be detected. Second, they must apply methods and practices to allow for the generalization of the results beyond the specific study. In the following, we demonstrate how and under what conditions these challenges can be addressed in research practice. To this end, the research process of the construction of an empirically based typology is described. A qualitative study, conducted within the framework of the Luxembourg Youth Report, is used to illustrate this process. Specifically, strategies are presented which increase the likelihood of generalizability or transferability of the results, while also highlighting their limitations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (20 UL)