References of "Human mutation"
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See detailMyoclonus-dystonia: significance of large SGCE deletions.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Djarmati, A.; Lohmann-Hedrich, K. et al

in Human mutation (2008), 29(2), 331-2

Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder caused by mutations in SGCE. We investigated the frequency and type of SGCE mutations with emphasis on gene dosage alterations and ... [more ▼]

Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is an autosomal-dominant movement disorder caused by mutations in SGCE. We investigated the frequency and type of SGCE mutations with emphasis on gene dosage alterations and explored the associated phenotypes. We tested 35 M-D index patients by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and genomic sequencing. Mutations were found in 26% (9/35) of the cases, all but three with definite M-D. Two heterozygous deletions of the entire SGCE gene and flanking DNA and a heterozygous deletion of exon 2 only were detected, accounting for 33% (3/9) of the mutations found. Both large deletions contained COL1A2 and were additionally associated with joint problems. Further, we discovered one novel small deletion (c.771_772delAT, p.C258X) and four recurrent point mutations (c.289C>T, p.R97X; c.304C>T, p.R102X; c.709C>T, p.R237X; c.1114C>T, p.R372X). A Medline search identified 22 articles on SGCE mutational screening. Sixty-four unrelated M-D patients were described with 41 different mutations. No genotype-phenotype association was found, except in patients with deletions encompassing additional genes. In conclusion, a rigorous clinical preselection of patients and careful accounting for non-motor signs should precede mutational tests. Gene dosage studies should be included in routine SGCE genetic testing. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel homozygous p.E64D mutation in DJ1 in early onset Parkinson disease (PARK7).
Hering, Robert; Strauss, Karsten M.; Tao, Xiao et al

in Human mutation (2004), 24(4), 321-9

Mutations in the parkin gene have been identified as a common cause of autosomal recessive inherited Parkinson disease (PD) associated with early disease manifestation. However, based on linkage data ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the parkin gene have been identified as a common cause of autosomal recessive inherited Parkinson disease (PD) associated with early disease manifestation. However, based on linkage data, mutations in other genes contribute to the genetic heterogeneity of early-onset PD (EOPD). Recently, two mutations in the DJ1 gene were described as a second cause of autosomal recessive EOPD (PARK7). Analyzing the PARK7/DJ1 gene in 104 EOPD patients, we identified a third mutation, c.192G>C (p.E64D), associated with EOPD in a patient of Turkish ancestry and characterized the functional significance of this amino acid substitution. In the patient, a substantial reduction of dopamine uptake transporter (DAT) binding was found in the striatum using [(18)F]FP-CIT and PET, indicating a serious loss of presynaptic dopaminergic afferents. His sister, homozygous for E64D, was clinically unaffected but showed reduced dopamine uptake when compared with a clinically unaffected brother, who is heterozygous for E64D. We demonstrate by crystallography that the E64D mutation does not alter the structure of the DJ1 protein, however we observe a tendency towards decreased levels of the mutant protein when overexpressed in HEK293 or COS7 cells. Using immunocytochemistry in contrast to the homogenous nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in HEK293 cells overexpressing wild-type DJ1, about 5% of the cells expressing E64D and up to 80% of the cells expressing the recently described L166P mutation displayed a predominant nuclear localization of the mutant DJ1 protein. [less ▲]

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