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See detailSpecial Issue: The Dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy: Border Making and its Consequences.
Venken, Machteld UL; Bo Frandsen, Steen

in European Review of History (2020), 27(6),

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See detailThe Dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy: Border Making and its Consequences.
Venken, Machteld UL

in European Review of History (2020), 26(6), 697-708

This special issue addresses practices of border-making and their consequences on the territory of the former Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. As the reality did not correspond to the peaceful Europe ... [more ▼]

This special issue addresses practices of border-making and their consequences on the territory of the former Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. As the reality did not correspond to the peaceful Europe articulated in the Paris Treaties, a multitude of (un)foreseen complications followed the drawing of borders and states. Articles include new case studies on the creation, centralization or peripheralization of border regions, such as Subcarpathian Rus, Vojvodina, Banat and the Carpathian Mountains, on border zones such as the Czechoslovakian harbour in Germany, and on cross-border activities. The special issue shows how disputes over national identities and ethnic minorities, as well as other factors such as the economic consequences of the new state borders, appeared on the interwar political agenda and coloured the lives of borderland inhabitants. Adopting a bottom-up approach, the contributions demonstrate the agency of borderlands and their people in the establishment, functioning, disorganization or ultimate breakdown of some of the newly created interwar nation-states. [less ▲]

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See detailToo small to be of interest, too large to grasp? Histories of the Luxembourg financial centre
Majerus, Benoît UL; Zenner, Benjamin UL

in European Review of History (2020)

The importance of smaller financial centres in international capitalism has recently been highlighted by a number of ‘leaks’. Yet such public attention stands in contrast to the paucity of ... [more ▼]

The importance of smaller financial centres in international capitalism has recently been highlighted by a number of ‘leaks’. Yet such public attention stands in contrast to the paucity of historiographical research on these relatively new centres. To this regard, Luxembourg provides an interesting case study. While identified as a ‘global specialist’ by the Global Financial Centres Index, the genealogy of how it came to achieve this status remains largely under-researched. This article reviews the historiography of the Luxembourg financial centre from both external perspectives – how the international social sciences and humanities have positioned the Luxembourg financial sector within the broader finance and banking context – and internal viewpoints – how scholars in Luxembourg have recounted the relevant events. The Luxembourg financial centre began to appear in international historiography only in the last fifteen years. With only rare departures from general overviews and a tendency not to consult local sources, the contributions of international historians have mostly attempted to identify time frames and contextualise the particularities of its historical development. That said, a recent geographical diversification of the literature has seen the appearance of publications that demonstrate a more detailed understanding of its internal structures and links with other nerve centres of the global financial system. While a Luxembourg historiography began to develop in the late 1970s, it has often been produced to coincide with commemorative events, funded by players in the financial centre and frequently written by these same actors. While not necessarily hagiographic in approach, a lack of distance from the subject and a failure to problematise the subject has nevertheless meant that these writings are little more than factual introductions that, while useful, are limited in their historiographical depth. Furthermore, a dearth of archival research has produced a repetitive narrative based around a selection of key events and figures. [less ▲]

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See detailA Tale of Two Referenda: The Greek Plebiscite of 1946 and the Referendum of July 2015
Paravantis, Spero UL

in European Review of History (2019)

This paper compares two periods of crisis in Greece separated by 70 years, the crisis surrounding the national elections and the plebiscite on the return of the Greek monarchy in 1946, and the referendum ... [more ▼]

This paper compares two periods of crisis in Greece separated by 70 years, the crisis surrounding the national elections and the plebiscite on the return of the Greek monarchy in 1946, and the referendum on the terms contained in the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) of July 2015, and the international involvement in and reaction to these referenda. The inspirations for the paper, were the ways in which external forces attempted to direct their outcome, and the similarities in the ways in which in both periods, external forces attempted to frame the definition of the referenda in favour of their wider strategic objectives. The pressure placed on the Greek government, both from within Greece and from without, was also noteworthy, as was the rhetoric that was used both during and after both events. The paper concludes that in these two cases, rather than providing resolution to an issue, the referenda served mainly as a vehicle of protest, extremely susceptible to manipulation, leading to a situation worse than that which had preceded them. [less ▲]

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See detailFacing the Greek Junta (1967-1974): The Council of Europe, the European Community, and the Rise of Human Rights Politics
Fernandez Soriano, Victor UL

in European Review of History (2017), 24(3), 358-376

In April 1967, a group of colonels seized power in Greece. Since Greece was a member-state of the Council of Europe and held an association agreement with the European Community, both organizations had to ... [more ▼]

In April 1967, a group of colonels seized power in Greece. Since Greece was a member-state of the Council of Europe and held an association agreement with the European Community, both organizations had to define their positions vis-à-vis the new military regime. Very soon, politicians in the parliamentary assemblies of both organizations started to cooperate with the aim of imposing sanctions on Greece. This article examines the inter-organizational dynamics between the European Community and the Council of Europe on Greece during the colonels’ regime. It argues that the European Community imported concrete policy positions and even normative ideas which had first emerged in the Council of Europe. In so doing, the Community prepared the ground for its future human-rights policies. [less ▲]

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See detailGrowing up in the shadow of the Second World War: European perspectives
Venken, Machteld UL; Röger, Maren

in European Review of History (2015), 22(2), 199-220

In this Special Issue, the authors explore the various ways in which the Second WorldWar shaped children’s experiences in the post-war period. They map the multifacetedinterest or non-interest of states ... [more ▼]

In this Special Issue, the authors explore the various ways in which the Second WorldWar shaped children’s experiences in the post-war period. They map the multifacetedinterest or non-interest of states all over Europe for children in the years after the war,filter out groups of children who recall that the consequences of the Second World Warsignificantly influenced their childhood, and investigate the childhood policies directedtowards them, as well as their childhood experiences and the memories they fosterabout their childhood. In addition, they have included case studies from Western,Central and Eastern Europe with the aim of sparking a debate as to whether it was onlya similar lifecycle that war children in early post-war Europe shared, or if they also hadsome life experiences in common. [less ▲]

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See detailCompte rendu de John Man, Attila: The Barbarian King Who Challenged Rome
Pettiau, Hérold UL

in European Review of History (2009), 16(2), 255-256

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See detailRevisiting psychiatry in twentieth-century Europe
Majerus, Benoît UL

in European Review of History (2008), 15(1), 55--67

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