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See detailIntact pain modulation through manipulation of controllability and expectations in aging
González-Roldán, Ana María; Terrasa, Juan Lorenzo; Prats-Sedano, Maria Angeles et al

in European Journal of Pain (2021)

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See detailAltered regulation of negative affect in patients with fibromyalgia : a diary study
Rost, Silke; Crombez, Geert; Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2021)

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability ... [more ▼]

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability to regulate emotional problems. In this study, we examined two indices of emotion regulation, that is, (a) affective instability, involving frequent large fluctuations in self-reported affect, and (b) resting heart rate variability (HRV). 45.4 years; 39 females) and 46 matched healthy controls (M-age = 44.9 years; 37 females). Heart rate was monitored under resting conditions to derive HRV. Subsequently, participants completed an electronic end-of-day diary for 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain, disability, negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA). Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood. Results Results indicate increased levels of NA instability and reduced levels of HRV in patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, HRV and NA instability were inversely related. Finally, in patients, higher NA instability was related to increased pain disability. Conclusions Current findings support the idea that patients with fibromyalgia are confronted with fluctuating emotions. These results may have important implications for treatment as they provide support for the use of emotion regulation skills training in patients with fibromyalgia to impact upon NA instability. Significance This study provides novel insight in the link between emotion regulation indices,that is, heart-rate variability and negative affective (NA) instability, in patients with fibromyalgia, and presents evidence for differences in both emotion regulation indices between patients with fibromyalgia and healthy people. Furthermore, results link increased NA instability with increased levels of daily disability in patients with fibromyalgia. Together, these findings offer support for a key role of emotion regulation in fibromyalgia outcomes, providing pathways for clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailDistraction from pain: The role of selective attention and pain catastrophizing
Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Gonzalez-Roldan, Ana Maria; Montoya, Pedro et al

in European Journal of Pain (2020), 24(10), 1880-1891

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See detailParental (non-)pain attending verbalizations moderate the relationship between child attention and memory bias for pain
Wauters, Aline; Noel, Melanie; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2020), 24(9), 1797--1811

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain ... [more ▼]

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain development. While mechanisms underlying children's pain memory development remain poorly understood, attention biases and parent language have been implicated in conceptual models. This study examined the association between child pain‐related attention and memory biases and the moderating role of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Methods: Participants were 51 school children and one of their parents. Probability of initial fixation and gaze duration to pain were assessed using eye tracking methodology. Children performed a cold pressor task (CPT) and reported on experienced pain intensity and pain‐related fear. A 3‐minute parent–child interaction upon CPT completion allowed measurement of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Children's pain‐related memories were elicited 2 weeks later. Results: Findings indicated that the relationship between maintained attention to pain and fear memory bias was moderated by parental non‐pain attending verbalizations such that higher gaze duration bias was positively associated with fear memory bias but only among children whose parents demonstrated low levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. The opposite pattern was observed for children whose parents showed high levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. No such effects were observed for child initial attention bias to pain, memory bias for pain and parental pain attending verbalizations. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of parental and child pain‐related variables as well as their interaction in understanding negatively biased pain‐related memories. Significance: This study on child pain memories is the first to highlight that characteristics of the social context, such as parental (non‐)pain‐related verbalizations, as well as factors related to the intra‐individual experience of pain, such as child attention bias to pain, should be studied jointly, as they interact with each other in their effect on the emergence of negatively biased memories of painful events. [less ▲]

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See detailPainful decisions: How classifying sensations can change the experience of pain
Van Der Meulen, Marian UL; Anton, Fernand UL; Petersen, Sibylle UL

in European Journal of Pain (2017)

Background: Categorizing perceptual stimuli is a mechanism for facilitating the processing of sensory input from our environment. This facilitation of perception is achieved through generalization ... [more ▼]

Background: Categorizing perceptual stimuli is a mechanism for facilitating the processing of sensory input from our environment. This facilitation of perception is achieved through generalization (assimilation) of stimulus characteristics within categories and accentuation between categories. These categorization processes have been demonstrated in visual, auditory, tactile and social perception, but never in pain perception. Method: We presented participants with six thermal noxious stimuli, increasing in steps of 0.5 °C. In an experimental group, stimuli were assigned to two categories labelled A and B containing the three lower (A1, A2, A3) and three higher (B1, B2, B3) stimuli. A control group did not receive such category information (stimuli were labelled S1–S6). In a first part of the experiment, participants simply rated pain intensity and unpleasantness for all stimuli. In a second part, we presented stimuli without labels and participants had to identify the label of each stimulus. Results: We found evidence for categorization effects in both pain ratings and stimulus identification data. In particular, unpleasantness ratings within categories were more similar to each other, and ratings between categories less similar, in the experimental compared to control group. Participants in the experimental group also confused stimuli more often within than between categories, and were more confident about category membership of stimuli at the category border, compared to participants in the control group. Conclusions: Mere category information, using abstract category labels, significantly changes pain perception. Implications for our understanding of cognitive pain modulation mechanisms, as well as clinical implications of categorization effects are discussed. Significance: Categorization effects in pain perception are demonstrated. Classifying and labelling painful events can modulate early perceptual processes, lead to under- or overestimation of pain symptoms and affect decision-making behaviour related to pain. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards an integrative view of cognitive biases in pain.
Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Vervoort, Tine

in European Journal of Pain (2016), 20(8), 1201-2

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See detailSuffering as an independent component of the experience of pain
Bustan, Smadar UL; Gonzalez-Roldan, Ana; Kamping, Sandra et al

in European Journal of Pain (2015)

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See detailGeneral hypervigilance in fibromyalgia: one swallow does not make a summer.
Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Crombez, Geert

in European Journal of Pain (2015), 19(4), 447-8

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See detailKeeping pain out of your mind: the role of attentional set in pain.
Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Crombez, G.; Eccleston, C. et al

in European Journal of Pain (2013), 17(3), 402-11

BACKGROUND: The involuntary capture of attention by pain may, to some extent, be controlled by psychological variables. In this paper, we investigated the effect of attentional set (i.e., the collection ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The involuntary capture of attention by pain may, to some extent, be controlled by psychological variables. In this paper, we investigated the effect of attentional set (i.e., the collection of task-related features that a person is monitoring in order to successfully pursue a goal) on pain. METHODS: Two experiments are reported in which the task relevance of the modality and spatial location of a target stimulus was manipulated. In both experiments, somatosensory and auditory stimuli were presented on each trial. In experiment 1, 29 participants were cued on each trial to localize either a somatosensory or an auditory target. In experiment 2, 37 participants were cued on each trial to identify either a somatosensory or an auditory target at a particular location. RESULTS: In experiment 1, self-reported pain intensity and unpleasantness were reduced when participants had to localize the auditory target. The location of the painful stimulus relative to the location of the auditory target did not affect pain. In experiment 2, again, pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings were reduced when participants identified the auditory target. Now, the location of the painful stimulus relative to the location of the auditory target moderated the effect. Pain intensity was less when the painful stimulus was at a different location than the auditory target. CONCLUSIONS: Results are discussed in terms of the attentional set hypothesis, and we argue that the effectiveness of distraction tasks depends on the degree to which the task-relevant features of the distraction task are distinct from pain-related features. [less ▲]

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See detailPain catastrophizing influences the use and the effectiveness of distraction in schoolchildren.
Verhoeven, K.; Goubert, L.; Jaaniste, T. et al

in European Journal of Pain (2012), 16(2), 256-67

Distraction is an intuitive way of coping with pain and is often used in children's pain treatment programs. However, empirical evidence concerning the effectiveness of distraction is equivocal. One ... [more ▼]

Distraction is an intuitive way of coping with pain and is often used in children's pain treatment programs. However, empirical evidence concerning the effectiveness of distraction is equivocal. One potential explanation might be that distraction does not work for everyone in every situation. In the current series of studies, we examined the role of pain catastrophizing as an influencing factor of distraction effectiveness. In the first study, we investigated the use of pain coping strategies (including distraction) in schoolchildren (N = 828, aged 8-18 years) by means of a questionnaire. Results indicated that children with higher levels of pain catastrophizing reported using less distraction strategies in daily life than children with lower levels of pain catastrophizing. In the second study, a subsample (N = 81, aged 9-18 years) performed a painful cold pressor task (CPT) (12 degrees C). Participants were randomly assigned to a distraction group, in which an attention-demanding tone-detection task was performed during the CPT, or a control group, in which no distraction task was performed. Results showed that participants in the distraction group were engaged in the distraction task, and reported to have paid less attention to pain than participants in the control group. However, distraction was ineffective in reducing cold pressor pain, and even intensified the pain experience in high catastrophizing children. Caution may be warranted in using distraction as a 'one size fits all' method, especially in high catastrophizing children. [less ▲]

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See detailDistraction from pain and executive functioning: an experimental investigation of the role of inhibition, task switching and working memory.
Verhoeven, Katrien; Van Damme, Stefaan; Eccleston, Christopher et al

in European Journal of Pain (2011), 15(8), 866-73

Although many studies have investigated the effectiveness of distraction as a method of pain control, the cognitive processes by which attentional re-direction is achieved, remain unclear. In this study ... [more ▼]

Although many studies have investigated the effectiveness of distraction as a method of pain control, the cognitive processes by which attentional re-direction is achieved, remain unclear. In this study the role of executive functioning abilities (inhibition, task switching and working memory) in the effectiveness of distraction is investigated. We hypothesized that the effectiveness of distraction in terms of pain reduction would be larger in participants with better executive functioning abilities. Ninety-one undergraduate students first performed executive functioning tasks, and subsequently participated in a cold pressor task (CPT). Participants were randomly assigned to (1) a distraction group, in which an attention-demanding tone-detection task was performed during the CPT, or (2) a control group, in which no distraction task was performed. Participants in the distraction group reported significantly less pain during the CPT, but the pain experience was not influenced by executive functioning abilities. However, the performance on the distraction task improved with better inhibition abilities, indicating that inhibition abilities might be important in focussing on a task despite the pain. [less ▲]

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See detailInternal validity of inter-digital web pinching as a model for perceptual diffuse inhibitory controls -induced hypoalgesia in healthy humans
Streff, Anouk; Michaux, Gilles; Anton, Fernand UL

in European Journal of Pain (2011), 15(1), 45-52

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See detailDifferential physiological effects during tonic painful hand immersion tests using hot and ice water
Streff, Anouk; Kuehl, Linn; Michaux, Gilles et al

in European Journal of Pain (2010), 14(3), 266-272

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See detailComments on "Reccommendations on terminology and practice on psychophysical DNIC testing" by Yarnitsky et al. 14(4), 339
Michaux, Gilles; Anton, Fernand UL; Erpelding, Nathalie et al

in European Journal of Pain (2010)

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See detailEffects of chronic intermittent restraint stress on inflammation-related pain behavior and spinal cell activation in rats.
Juif, Pierre-Eric; Anton, Fernand UL; Hanesch, Ulrike UL

in European Journal of Pain (2009), 13(1), 74-75

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See detailThe neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist RP 67580, reduces the sensitization of primary afferents by substance P in the rat.
Pawlak, Matthias; Schmidt, Robert; Heppelmann, Bernd et al

in European Journal of Pain (2001), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (1 UL)