References of "European Journal of Education"
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See detailWho aspires to higher education? Axes of inequality, values of education and higher education aspirations in secondary schools in Luxembourg and the Swiss Canton of Bern
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Scharf, Jan; Hascher, Tina

in European Journal of Education (2021), 56(1), 9-26

This article reports a study that investigated secondary school students’ higher education aspirations (towards university studies, ISCED 6 and above) and how these differ between student groups as well ... [more ▼]

This article reports a study that investigated secondary school students’ higher education aspirations (towards university studies, ISCED 6 and above) and how these differ between student groups as well as how these are impacted by values of education. Panel data of more than 300 secondary school students in two countries, Luxembourg and Switzerland (the Swiss Canton of Bern) was analysed. Schools are structured differently in the education systems of Luxembourg and the Swiss Canton of Bern. The results of our analysis show that students in the Luxembourgish sample more often aspire to higher education than in the Swiss sample. Disparities in higher education aspirations were also more pronounced in the Luxembourgish sample, boys and students from families of low socio-economic status (SES) were less likely to aspire to higher education. While the effects of values of education are generally scarce, stimulation in terms of anticipated enjoyment and interest derived from participation in higher education seems to have a positive effect on higher education aspirations. [less ▲]

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See detail(Re)shaping Educational Research through ‘Programmification’: Institutional Expansion, Change, and Translation in Norway
Zapp, Mike UL; Helgetun, Jo B.; Powell, Justin J W UL

in European Journal of Education (2018), 52

Educational research in Norway has experienced unprecedented structural expansion as well as cognitive shifts over the past two decades, especially due to increased state investments and the strategic use ... [more ▼]

Educational research in Norway has experienced unprecedented structural expansion as well as cognitive shifts over the past two decades, especially due to increased state investments and the strategic use of extensive and multi-year thematic programs to fund research projects. Applying a neo-institutionalist framework, we examine institutionalization dynamics in cultural-cognitive, normative, and regulative dimensions over the past two decades using interviews, research program calls, policy documents, and funding data. In the cultural-cognitive dimension, we find references to the knowledge society, the importance of evidence in policy-making, and ideas of quality, excellence, and relevance. In the normative dimension, we find the introduction of new professional and methodological standards, reflecting broader global patterns of academic and epistemic drift. In the regulative dimension, the strengthened role of both government and the Research Council of Norway is manifest in substantial growth in both funding and large-scale, long-term planning, including thematic choices—evidence of ‘programification’. The importance of external models has grown in an era of internationalization, yet translation occurs at every level of governance of educational research. This results in a specific Norwegian research model, guided by a mode of governance of programs, that maintains social values traditionally strong in Nordic societies. [less ▲]

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See detailClassroom biographies: Teaching and learning in evolving material landscapes (c. 1960-2015)
Tondeur, Jo; Herman, Frederik UL; De Buck, Maud et al

in European Journal of Education (2017)

Despite growing interest in redesigning the material landscape of education, relatively little is known about the impact of these evolving classrooms. The current study aimed to gain insight into the ... [more ▼]

Despite growing interest in redesigning the material landscape of education, relatively little is known about the impact of these evolving classrooms. The current study aimed to gain insight into the physical learning environment and the potential pedagogical impacts thereof. A ‘biographical approach’ (c.1963-2015), was used to explore the long-term socio-material landscapes where teachers and pupils, classroom materiality and spatiality, and teaching practices are entangled. Stimulated recall interviews were conducted in Flanders (Belgium) with primary school teachers. Teacher-generated floorplans detailing their material classroom over time, transcribed oral accounts elaborating on these, and supportive data sources were aggregated and thematically analysed. The resulting identification of six key themes shed light on the evolving architectural and infrastructural developments, as well as triggers and teaching impacts thereof amongst the interviewed teachers. Findings show that negative school evaluations urging school intervention, and teachers’ proactive engagement within their classrooms, were the main catalysts of change. Moreover, evolving classroom layouts, in addition to the affordances of upgraded equipment, can be associated to changes in teachers’ practices. It can be concluded that the classroom is becoming an action context as the result of the inextricable mediating agencies identified. [less ▲]

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See detailLearning strategies in enterprises: Empirical findings, implications and perspectives for the immediate future
Brandi, Ulrik; Iannone, Rosa Lisa UL

in European Journal of Education (2016), 51(2), 227243

The article examines learning strategies at the enterprise level, conceptualising them into three main dimensions: learning systems and incentives, connecting to the affective dimension of learning which ... [more ▼]

The article examines learning strategies at the enterprise level, conceptualising them into three main dimensions: learning systems and incentives, connecting to the affective dimension of learning which behavioural learning addresses effectively; skills’ development, chiefly addressing the cognitive dimension of learning to which cognitive and action learning principles can be applied; and, work design and the organisation of work, which attend to the structural dimension of learning and socio-cultural approaches. Through this conceptual understanding, we empirically explored the learning strategies of 194 enterprises, searching for the most pressing needs and commitments to learning. Our results show that enterprises struggle to find the optimal balance between the use of systematic and ad-hoc arrangements of learning systems and incentives, yet they must emphasise intrinsic needs as a key business strategy, systematise certain aspects of HR, whilst minimising the negative effects of status distinction, hierarchy and bureaucracy. They must also address the pervasive effects of stress and burnouts. Most especially, enterprises must address the gap between the high valuation of soft skills and the low investment in developing them. Methods equipping enterprises with clear calculations for return on investment in soft skills' training are needed. These issues can be effectively addressed by strengthening networks and communities of practice, fostering greater awareness of public funds and public-sponsored opportunities, investing in public-private research and backing the greater recognition of on-the-job learning. [less ▲]

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See detailComplex problem solving skills and innovativeness. Evidence from occupational testing and regional data.
Ederer, Peer; Patt, Alexander; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Education (2016), 51(2),

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See detailThe Shifting Relationship between Vocational and Higher Education in France and Germany: Towards Convergence?
Powell, Justin J W UL; Graf, Lukas UL; Bernhard, Nadine et al

in European Journal of Education (2012), 47(3), 405-423

For decades, the skill formation systems in France and Germany have been analysed as contrasting cases because of institutionalised differences in educational values, norms, and governance, as well as in ... [more ▼]

For decades, the skill formation systems in France and Germany have been analysed as contrasting cases because of institutionalised differences in educational values, norms, and governance, as well as in labour markets. This comparison follows the logic of difference, comparing dissimilar skill formation systems in centralist France and federalist Germany. Cross-national variance has often been explained in terms of the institutionalization of vocational education, but higher education also differs considerably. Many typologies of vocational education and training (VET) and higher education (HE) summarise these differences. However, not only are national skill formation systems affected by the emerging European model of education via the Bologna and Copenhagen Processes, but the French and German political economies have also been greatly reconfigured in the last two decades. Comparing the present situation, we ask whether traditional education and training typologies continue to be valid. While they have served as useful heuristic devices, they may hinder recognition of contemporary institutional changes, especially incremental changes that may nevertheless be transformational because of endogenous reforms and exogenous pressures due to Europeanisation. Do these typologies continue to reflect these systems as they evolve? To what extent have the key characteristics of skill formation systems in France and Germany changed, exemplified in the relationship between VET and HE? Have these countries converged? [less ▲]

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See detailApplying the Varieties of Capitalism Approach to Higher Education. Comparing the Internationalization of German and British Universities
Graf, Lukas UL

in European Journal of Education (2009), 44(4), 569-585

In recent years, the global market for higher education has expanded rapidly, while internationalisation strategies have been developed at university, national and European levels to increase the ... [more ▼]

In recent years, the global market for higher education has expanded rapidly, while internationalisation strategies have been developed at university, national and European levels to increase the competitiveness of higher education institutions. This article asks how institutional settings prevailing in national models of capitalism motivate distinct national approaches with regard to the internationalisation, globalisation, and Europeanisation of higher education systems. While the university is defined as an organisational actor embedded in the higher education system, the higher education system itself represents an institutional subsystem within the national model of capitalism. An analytical framework is then developed on the basis of the Varieties of Capitalism approach to compare the internationalisation of German and British universities. Findings indicate that the relations between the various actors involved in the internationalisation of universities are based largely on market coordination in the British case. In contrast, this process in Germany relies more on strategic interactions between the various organisational actors in higher education. The development paths in the internationalisation of universities are found to be influenced by and reflect the specific mode of coordination in the respective higher education system and the national model of capitalism more generally. This comparative case study shows that recent conceptions of path dependence as well as conceptual tools developed in the Varieties of Capitalism literature, such as institutional complementarity and comparative institutional advantage, may be fruitfully applied to research on institutional change in higher education systems. [less ▲]

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