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See detailViews on Ageing - A Lifespan Approach
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Kessler, Eva-Marie; Wurm, Susanne et al

in European Journal of Ageing (in press)

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See detailYoung people feel wise and older people feel energetic: Comparing age stereotypes and self-evaluations across adulthood
Bowen, Catherine E.; Spuling, Svenja M.; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL et al

in European Journal of Ageing (in press)

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See detailThe Uniqueness of Subjective Ageing. Convergent and Discriminant Validity
Spuling, Svenja M.; Klusmann, Verena; Bowen, Catherine E. et al

in European Journal of Ageing (in press)

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See detailCurrent directions in views on aging. Editorial for the Special Section.
Klusmann, Verena; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in European Journal of Ageing (in press)

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See detailSubjective remaining lifetime and concreteness of the future as differential predictors of preparation for age-related changes
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Voss, Peggy; Rothermund, Klaus

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF AGEING (2018), 15(1), 67-76

Demographic changes have been linked to the expectation of cuts in government-provided social security services, emphasizing individual responsibility to prepare for old age and concomitant challenges and ... [more ▼]

Demographic changes have been linked to the expectation of cuts in government-provided social security services, emphasizing individual responsibility to prepare for old age and concomitant challenges and changes. Accordingly, the identification of psychological variables predicting preparation is a matter of theoretical as well as practical importance. We thus consider different aspects of a person's future time as theoretically prominent psychological predictors of preparation. The subjectively perceived quantity of remaining lifetime, the concreteness of future time, and preparation for life domains indicative of an active third age as well as of a more dependent fourth age were assessed in a longitudinal study in a core sample of N = 593 participants (30-80 years old at T (1)) at two measurement occasions 4 years apart. The quantity of subjective remaining lifetime predicted subsequent changes in preparation, but this effect was restricted to preparation for the fourth age. In contrast, a more open and concrete outlook on ones' personal future predicted changes in preparation for an active third age. Our findings highlight the importance of distinguishing between different aspects of future time-its quantity versus its relation to goals and action plans-when predicting specific facets of developmental self-regulation. [less ▲]

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See detail"The closer you get …" Age, attitudes and self-serving evaluations about older drivers
Ferring, Dieter UL; Tournier, Isabelle UL; Mancini, Denis Arduino UL

in European Journal of Ageing (2015), 12(3), 229-238

The present study investigates attitudes about older drivers and road safety measures with a particular focus on self-serving evaluations. Driving capacity is considered here as an indicator of awareness ... [more ▼]

The present study investigates attitudes about older drivers and road safety measures with a particular focus on self-serving evaluations. Driving capacity is considered here as an indicator of awareness of age-related changes (AARC) that may lead to a higher risk of self-stereotyping, motivating self-serving evaluations with advancing age. In order to test this notion, we used the perceived distance between ones chronological age and the age assigned to the social categories of “older driver” and “old person” as an indicator of age-group dissociation. Self-serving evaluations were expected depending on the distance between chronological and subjective age estimates. In addition to this, we tested gender and age effects on the specific evaluations. A sample of 350 participants aged 19-88 completed an online questionnaire on negative and positive stereotypes about older drivers and road safety measures to increase road safety. Results indicated a more positive than negative view of older drivers and approval with measures to increase road safety by regulating older drivers was comparatively low. Female participants tended to agree more with negative stereotypes and regulative measures than male participants. Regression analyses revealed that chronological age was associated with less agreement with negative stereotypes and measures for road safety. Age-group dissociation as indicated by the difference between one’s chronological age and the estimated age the age of an “old person” was associated with less agreement with negative stereotypes; distancing oneself from the estimated age of an old driver was linked to less agreement with regulative measures. Findings underline in general that road safety enhancing efforts should avoid highlighting chronological age as sole driving risk factor to circumvent negative stereotyping with aging and unjustified driving cessation. [less ▲]

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See detailMultiple standards of aging: gender-specific age stereotypes in different life domains
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Voss, Peggy; Rothermund, Klaus

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF AGEING (2013), 10(4), 335-344

Whereas it is often stated that aging might have more negative consequences for the evaluation of women compared to men, evidence for this assumption is mixed. We took a differentiated look at age ... [more ▼]

Whereas it is often stated that aging might have more negative consequences for the evaluation of women compared to men, evidence for this assumption is mixed. We took a differentiated look at age stereotypes of men and women, assuming that the life domain in which older persons are rated moderates gender differences in age stereotypes. A sample of 298 participants aged 20-92 rated 65-year-old men and women on evaluative statements in eight different life domains. Furthermore, perceptions of gender-and domain-specific age-related changes were assessed by comparing the older targets to 45-year-old men and women, respectively. The results speak in favor of the domain specificity of evaluative asymmetries in age stereotypes for men and women, and imply that an understanding of gendered perceptions of aging requires taking into account the complexities of domain-specific views on aging. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional relationship quality of adult children whith ageing parents: On solidarity, conflict and ambivalence.
Ferring, Dieter UL; Michels, Tom UL; Boll, Thomas UL et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2009), 6

Emotions toward a relationship partner provide relevant and specific information about relationship quality. Based on this assumption the present study was performed to identify different types of ... [more ▼]

Emotions toward a relationship partner provide relevant and specific information about relationship quality. Based on this assumption the present study was performed to identify different types of emotional relationship quality of middle-aged adult children with their aging parents. This was done by cluster analytic procedures in a sample of 1,208 middle-aged adult children (482 men, 726 women). Using ratings of positive and negative emotions toward their mother and their father as grouping variables, the same four-cluster solution emerged for both the child-mother relationship and the child-father relationship. Clusters were labelled as amicable, disharmonious, detached, and ambivalent relationships. Results showed that especially amicable relationships clearly prevailed followed by ambivalent, detached, and disharmonious relationships. Clusters differed significantly with respect to gender of adult child, willingness to support, expected parental support, and overt conflicts. In a cross-classification of cluster membership regarding the child-mother relationship (4 clusters) and the child-father relationship (4 clusters), all possible 16 combinations were observed, with a considerable degree of divergence regarding the type of relationship quality within the same family. Results are discussed with respect to types of emotional relationship quality, within family differences, and the intrafamilial regulation of relationship quality. [less ▲]

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See detailStill the same and better off than others? Social and temporal comparisons in old age
Ferring, Dieter UL; Hoffmann, M.

in European Journal of Ageing (2007), 4(1), 23-34

Cognitive adaptation in the elderly and the motivated use of temporal and social comparisons set the conceptual frame for the present study. Three research questions were investigated in a sample of 2.129 ... [more ▼]

Cognitive adaptation in the elderly and the motivated use of temporal and social comparisons set the conceptual frame for the present study. Three research questions were investigated in a sample of 2.129 persons aged between 50 and 90 years. First, the direction of social and temporal comparisons for three domains (physical fitness, mental fitness, psychological resilience) was studied, and findings did show that especially lateral followed by upward comparisons were most frequent under both perspectives; downward comparisons clearly showed the least frequency. Second, the distribution of comparison directions was investigated across four age groups. These analyses showed that upward comparisons increased and lateral comparisons decreased across age groups; differential results were observed for the domains under consideration. Third, the relation between social and temporal comparisons and self-esteem was studied. Results obtained here indicated a motivated use of specific comparison directions since downward social comparisons and upward temporal comparisons were most frequent in persons with low self-esteem. Taken together, the study underlines the different functions of social and temporal comparisons in adulthood and old age; it indicates a predominant need for consensus and consistency, and it highlights the importance of self-esteem in cognitive adaptation. [less ▲]

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See detailLife satisfaction in older people in six European countries: Findings from the European Study on Adult Well-being
Ferring, Dieter UL; Balducci, Christian; Burholt, Vanessa et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2007), 1(1), 15-25

The European Study on Adult Well-being (ESAW), funded by the European Union, was conducted during 2002 and 2003 in Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden. The aim of the ... [more ▼]

The European Study on Adult Well-being (ESAW), funded by the European Union, was conducted during 2002 and 2003 in Austria, Italy, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden. The aim of the interdisciplinary study was the conceptual clarification and the identification of factors contributing to life satisfaction for older people. Five key components were included in the study: (1) physical health and functional status; (2) self-resources; (3) material security; (4) social support resources; and (5) life activity. A representative population of adults aged 50-90 years living independently (not institutionalised) was selected in each participating country, and the actual sample size came very close to the target of 2,000, ranging from 1,854 to 2,417. The total European sample comprised 12,478 respondents. In this paper, mean differences in general and domain-specific life satisfaction between the six countries including age groups and gender are reported and discussed with respect to contextual national characteristics. In general the findings showed a high level in all chosen indicators of life satisfaction across the six countries. National differences depended on the domain under consideration, but the results showed in general that The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Luxembourg and Austria had higher values of life satisfaction compared to Sweden and Italy. [less ▲]

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