References of "Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBankruptcy regulation and self-employment entry: the moderating roles of income share, parenthood, and hybrid entrepreneurship
Schulz, Matthias; Schwens, Christian; Fisch, Christian UL

in Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice (2021), 45(6), 1522-1549

We investigate how individual factors moderate the impact of bankruptcy exemption levels—that is, the amount of wealth individuals can keep in case of bankruptcy—on entry into self-employment ... [more ▼]

We investigate how individual factors moderate the impact of bankruptcy exemption levels—that is, the amount of wealth individuals can keep in case of bankruptcy—on entry into self-employment. Conceptually, we combine Prospect Theory’s axiom of diminishing sensitivity with insights from research on entrepreneurial failure. We hypothesize that individuals who face higher financial, social, or psychological costs because of bankruptcy will be less sensitive to higher exemption levels than will those who face lower costs across these dimensions. Our empirical results, which are based on a quasi-natural experiment in the United States, support our theoretical predictions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow do labor market institutions influence the preference to work in family firms? A multilevel analysis across 40 countries
Block, Jörn; Fisch, Christian UL; Lau, James et al

in Entrepreneurship: Theory and Practice (2019), 43(6), 1067-1093

Family firms must attract talented employees to stay competitive. They have different employer characteristics than nonfamily firms. For example, although they generally offer lower wages, they also ... [more ▼]

Family firms must attract talented employees to stay competitive. They have different employer characteristics than nonfamily firms. For example, although they generally offer lower wages, they also typically offer higher job security and a more cooperative and entrepreneurial work environment. However, drawing on occupational choice theory, we argue that the importance of these unique family firm characteristics depends on the national labor market context in which the family firm is embedded. A multilevel investigation of 12,746 individuals in 40 countries shows that individuals prefer to work in family firms in labor markets with flexible unregulated hiring and firing practices, centralized wage determination, and low labor–employer cooperation. A cross-level analysis further shows that the national labor market context moderates the effects of individual-level factors determining the preference to work in a family firm (e.g., entrepreneurship intention). Our article is the first to consider labor market institutions in research on family firms as employers. Practical implications exist for family firms regarding their employer branding and intrapreneurship strategies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 UL)