References of "Educational Psychology"
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See detailMindfulness and situational interest
Grund, Axel UL; Schaefer, Nina; Sohlau, Sylvia et al

in EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY (2019), 39(3), 353-369

In an attempt to exploit the concept of mindfulness for educational contexts, we investigated the role of dispositional mindfulness as an internal resource for the development of situational interest ... [more ▼]

In an attempt to exploit the concept of mindfulness for educational contexts, we investigated the role of dispositional mindfulness as an internal resource for the development of situational interest. Using an online questionnaire, we assessed participants' (N = 161, mean age = 30.4 years, 74% female, 66% university students) mindfulness, presented them with a text on bionics, and asked them to indicate their situational interest regarding the material (t1). One week later, they indicated their maintained situational interest (t2). Findings reveal a positive relationship between mindfulness and situational interest at t1, especially with regard to participants' ability to be momentarily 'present' and affective aspects of situational interest. Furthermore, we found an indirect effect of mindfulness on maintained situational interest at t2 via participants' interest at t1. These findings were independent from participants' initial interest and knowledge. Contrary to our expectation, we did not find a moderation effect for mindfulness on the relation between situational interest at t1 and t2. We discuss these findings in terms of implications for formal learning contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailImpairments in learning due to motivational conflict: situation really matters
Brassler, Nina K.; Grund, Axel UL; Hilckmann, Kristina et al

in Educational Psychology (2016), 36(7), 1323-1336

Although many theories mention distractions by conflicting alternatives as a problem for self-regulation, motivational conflicts are rarely considered when explaining impairments in learning. In two ... [more ▼]

Although many theories mention distractions by conflicting alternatives as a problem for self-regulation, motivational conflicts are rarely considered when explaining impairments in learning. In two studies, we investigate the assumption of motivational interference theory that students show different amounts of impairments in learning depending on the presence and motivational strength of conflicting alternatives. In Study 1 (N = 221), the subjective value attributed to a respective alternative in a study-leisure conflict scenario partially accounted for differences in self-regulated learning while controlling for interindividual differences. Study 2 (N = 112) demonstrated that this pattern applies to both when the respective alternatives refer to 'liking to' (want conflicts) and 'having to' (should conflicts) do something. Moreover, it is demonstrated that impairments due to motivational conflict are higher than impairments inherent in the studying activity itself (baseline). The results emphasise the importance of concurring action alternatives for explaining difficulties in self-regulated learning. [less ▲]

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See detailMotivational interference in study-leisure conflicts: how opportunity costs affect the self-regulation of university students
Grund, Axel UL; Fries, Stefan

in Educational Psychology (2012), 32(5), 589-612

We examined the effects of motivational interference resulting from tempting action alternatives among a sample of university students with respect to a new measure of different motivational qualities ... [more ▼]

We examined the effects of motivational interference resulting from tempting action alternatives among a sample of university students with respect to a new measure of different motivational qualities. Participants imagined themselves in a typical study-leisure conflict and provided information about their internal conflict experience in two scenarios: reading a course paper instead of meeting friends and vice versa. Participants then evaluated intrinsic, mastery, approach, avoidance, and external incentives for both activities. Confirmatory factor analyses yielded good model fits for the proposed five-factor incentive structure. In accordance with the idea of motivational interference, the incentives for meeting friends were positively related to experienced internal conflict while imagining studying, representing opportunity costs of learning. The same pattern was found for the opportunity costs that the participants had experienced while imagining meeting friends. In particular, intrinsic and approach incentives represented incremental opportunity costs of activity engagement, regardless of whether the dismissed activity was related to achievement or leisure. The findings highlight the need to apply a dynamic and context-sensitive perspective on achievement motivation to the context of higher education. [less ▲]

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