References of "Economics and Human Biology"
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See detailPrenatal Economic Shocks and Birth Outcomes in UK Cohort Data
Clark, Andrew; d'ambrosio, Conchita UL; Rohde, Nicholas

in Economics and Human Biology (2021), 41

We consider the effects of major prenatal economic shocks experienced by mothers on two indicators of newborn-infant health, birth weight and head circumference, using detailed microdata from the UK ... [more ▼]

We consider the effects of major prenatal economic shocks experienced by mothers on two indicators of newborn-infant health, birth weight and head circumference, using detailed microdata from the UK ALSPAC survey. Controlling for physiological and socioeconomic factors, an economic shock in the first 18 weeks of gestation lowers birth weight by 40-70 grams and head circumference by 2-3mm. We find evidence of transmission via poorer maternal health due to absolute material deprivation and tobacco and alcohol consumption, but not for the endocrinological effects of increased psychosocial anxiety. The fragile-male hypothesis holds for birth weight but not for head circumference, as predicted by recent theories on gender differences in prenatal development. [less ▲]

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See detailPublicly provided healthcare and migration
Mahe, Clotilde UL

in Economics and Human Biology (2020), 39

Publicly provided healthcare has received growing attention. Debates have been fuelled by evidence on improved health and reduced poverty, and concerns over adverse labour market effects; concerns that ... [more ▼]

Publicly provided healthcare has received growing attention. Debates have been fuelled by evidence on improved health and reduced poverty, and concerns over adverse labour market effects; concerns that are, to date, only supported by mixed empirical findings. This article examines whether publicly provided healthcare influences the decision to migrate. The spatial and temporal variation in the expansion of a non-contributory health insurance programme in Mexico, combined with the panel dimension and the timing of household survey data allows causal identification of the effect of increased coverage on migration. Difference-in-differences estimates reveal that accessing healthcare for free raises internal migration. The effect on international migration, costlier by nature, is statistically insignificant. Potential mechanisms include better health, the alleviation of financial constraints and a greater propensity to work. Results point to the relevance of including household members who have migrated in assessing the impacts of social health policies. They suggest that publicly provided healthcare could have multiplier effects on economic development and welfare by enabling labour force detachment of working-age members in affiliated households. [less ▲]

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See detailInequality in old age cognition across the world
Olivera, Javier; Andreoli, Francesco; Leist, Anja UL et al

in Economics and Human Biology (2018), 29

Although cohort and country differences in average cognitive levels are well established, identifying the degree and determinants of inequalities in old age cognitive functioning could guide public health ... [more ▼]

Although cohort and country differences in average cognitive levels are well established, identifying the degree and determinants of inequalities in old age cognitive functioning could guide public health and policymaking efforts. We use all publicly available and representative old age surveys with comparable information to assess inequalities of cognitive functioning in six distinctive age groups of 29 countries. We document that cognitive inequalities in old age are largely determined by earlier educational inequalities as well as gender differential survival rates. For example, a one percentage point increase in the Gini index of past education is associated with an increase of 0.45 percentage points in the Gini index of delayed recall and 0.23 percentage points in the Gini of immediate recall. Results are robust to a variety of alternative explanations and persist even after controlling for gender-related biases in survival rates. Furthermore, we find evidence that unequal opportunities for education -captured by differences in parental background and gender- also have significant effects on inequality of old age cognition. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive Decline and Labor Market Activity
Dupuy, Arnaud UL; De Grip, Andries; Jolles, Jelle et al

in Economics and Human Biology (2015)

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