References of "Eating Behaviors"
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See detailImpulsive reactions to food-cues predict subsequent food craving
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2014), 15

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may ... [more ▼]

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may also play a role in food-cue reactivity. The current study investigated food-cue affected response inhibition and its relationship to food craving using a stop-signal task with pictures of food and neutral stimuli. Participants responded slower to food pictures as compared to neutral pictures. Reaction times in response to food pictures positively predicted scores on the Food Cravings Questionnaire – State (FCQ-S) after the task and particularly scores on its hunger subscale. Lower inhibitory performance in response to food pictures predicted higher FCQ-S scores and particularly those related to a desire for food and lack of control over consumption. Task performance was unrelated to current dieting or other measures of habitual eating behaviors. Results support models on interactive effects of top-down inhibitory control processes and bottom-up hedonic signals in the self-regulation of eating behavior, such that low inhibitory control specifically in response to appetitive stimuli is associated with increased craving, which may ultimately result in overeating. [less ▲]

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See detailWomen with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impaired inhibitory control, in response to pictures of high-calorie food-cues.
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2012), 13(4), 423-428

Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be ... [more ▼]

Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be impaired in inhibitory control, when confronted with palatable, high-calorie food-cues. Female college students (N = 50) where divided in low and high food addiction groups based on the symptom count of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Participants performed a Go/No-Go-task with high-calorie food-cues or neutral pictures presented behind the targets. Self-reported impulsivity was also assessed. The high food addiction group had faster reaction times in response to food-cues as compared to neutral cues and reported higher attentional impulsivity than the low food addiction group. Commission and omission errors did not differ between groups or picture types. Hence, women with food addiction symptoms reported higher attentional impulsivity and reacted faster in response to food-cues, although neither increased self-reported motor impulsivity nor impaired behavioral inhibition were found. Food addiction symptoms seem to be related to attentional aspects of impulsivity but not other facets of impulsivity. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhanced behavioral inhibition in restrained eaters
Meule, Adrian; Lukito, Steve; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2011), 12(2), 152-155

Impulsivity has been found to play a decisive role in both addiction and disordered eating. Behavioral and self-report measures show impulsive tendencies to even occur in non-clinical samples, e.g ... [more ▼]

Impulsivity has been found to play a decisive role in both addiction and disordered eating. Behavioral and self-report measures show impulsive tendencies to even occur in non-clinical samples, e.g. restrained eaters. Within this group, these traits interact with high reactivity to food-related cues leading to overeating. The aim of the present study was to investigate if restrained eaters show this behavioral disinhibition specifically in response to food-cues. Participants performed a Go/No-Go-task with stimuli encircled by pictures of high caloric foods or neutral objects. In contrast to our hypotheses, participants with medium-to-high restrained eating made less commission errors in response to both food and neutral pictures than unrestrained eaters. Additionally, participants' inhibitory performance in the high-restrained group were enhanced in the presence of food pictures. Results are in line with expanding evidence of counteractive-control mechanisms when restrained eaters are confronted with tempting food-related cues. [less ▲]

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