References of "Disability Studies Quarterly"
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See detailSubversive Status: Disability Studies in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland
Pfahl, Lisa; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability Studies Quarterly (2014), 34(2),

What activities facilitate the development of disability studies (DS)? What barriers hinder its (multi)disciplinary flourishing? We address these questions focusing on contemporary DS in Germany, Austria ... [more ▼]

What activities facilitate the development of disability studies (DS)? What barriers hinder its (multi)disciplinary flourishing? We address these questions focusing on contemporary DS in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland—vibrant but challenging locales for DS. This multidisciplinary field engages intellectuals, activists, and stakeholders to subversively cross disciplinary, institutional, and political divides. Critical DS scholarship relies on collaboration among members of the disability (rights) movement, advocates, and academics to develop its subversive status. Within the academy, despite general barriers to transdisciplinary fields of study and persistent disability discrimination, more positions have been devoted to research and teaching in DS. Intersectionality debates thrive and further disciplines discover the richness that the complex subject of dis/ability offers. The field, recognizing its subversive status and engaging insights from DS worldwide—across language and disciplinary boundaries—could better focus and unfold its critical powers. The potential of DS in the German-speaking countries continues to grow, with diverse conferences, teaching, and publications bolstering the exchange of ideas. [less ▲]

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See detailReview of Poore, Carol. Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability Studies Quarterly (2008), 28(4),

In Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture, Carol Poore offers numerous insights into the social, political, economic, and scientific processes that produce the tremendous range of disability ... [more ▼]

In Disability in Twentieth-Century German Culture, Carol Poore offers numerous insights into the social, political, economic, and scientific processes that produce the tremendous range of disability definitions—and treatments—of disabled people.Germany in the twentieth century presents a bountiful case for studying the consequences of different cultural representations and social understandings of human variations in embodiment. Yet this book not only spans Germany’s at times terrifying, at times liberating, twentieth century but also reaches beyond its title to creatively compare disability representations, scholarship, and social forces in the German-speaking countries and the United States. Building on decades of transatlantic scholarship and personal experiences, Poore is uniquely placed to guide us on a journey from the boundaries drawn around disability in the arts and state policies of the Weimar Republic to the eugenic nadir of Nazi Germany and to on-going struggles—and increasing victories—of people with disabilities for civil rights,self-determination, and social inclusion in both the United States and Germany. [less ▲]

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See detailConstructing Disability and Social Inequality Early in the Life Course
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability Studies Quarterly (2003), 23(2),

oining life course and educational stratification research with disability studies' complimentary emphasis on structure and disabling barriers enables a more complete analysis of the experiences and life ... [more ▼]

oining life course and educational stratification research with disability studies' complimentary emphasis on structure and disabling barriers enables a more complete analysis of the experiences and life chances of primary and secondary school students who are classified disabled. Because the processes that affect life course phases and transitions, as well as individual opportunities, identities, and attainments are cumulative, analysis of early differentiation is necessary to understand how (special) education legitimates and generates social inequality. Universal compulsory education led schools to develop a variety of sorting mechanisms. Especially during the resulting transitions within an educational system's learning opportunity structures, special educational needs are identified, labelled and categorical boundaries drawn around dis/ability altering individuals' trajectories. By stigmatizing, separating, and segregating students, special education institutions in Germany and the United States construct social inequality early in the life course. [less ▲]

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