References of "Computers in Human Behavior"
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See detailSome critical reflections on the special issue: Collaboration in the 21st century: The theory, assessment, and teaching of collaborative problem solving
Stadler, Matthias; Shubeck, Keith T.; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020)

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See detailThe assessment of collaborative problem solving in PISA 2015: Can computer agents replace humans?
Herborn, Katharina; Stadler, Matthias; Mustafic, Maida et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020)

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See detailCollaboration in the 21st century: The theory, assessment, and teaching of collaborative problem solving
Graesser, Arthur C.; Greiff, Samuel UL; Stadler, Matthias et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020)

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See detailTowards a cross-cultural assessment of binge-watching: Psychometric evaluation of the “watching TV series motives” and “binge-watching engagement and symptoms” questionnaires across nine languages
Flayelle, Maèva; Castro-Calvo, Jesús; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020), 111

In view of the growing interest regarding binge-watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of television (TV) series in a single sitting) research, two measures were developed and validated to assess ... [more ▼]

In view of the growing interest regarding binge-watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of television (TV) series in a single sitting) research, two measures were developed and validated to assess binge-watching involvement (“Binge-Watching Engagement and Symptoms Questionnaire”, BWESQ) and related motivations (“Watching TV Series Motives Questionnaire”, WTSMQ). To promote international and cross-cultural binge-watching research, the present article reports on the validation of these questionnaires in nine languages (English, French, Spanish, Italian, German, Hungarian, Persian, Arabic, Chinese). Both questionnaires were disseminated, together with additional self-report measures of happiness, psychopathological symptoms, impulsivity and problematic internet use among TV series viewers from a college/university student population (N = 12,616) in 17 countries. Confirmatory factor, measurement invariance and correlational analyses were conducted to establish structural and construct validity. The two questionnaires had good psychometric properties and fit in each language. Equivalence across languages and gender was supported, while construct validity was evidenced by similar patterns of associations with complementary measures of happiness, psychopathological symptoms, impulsivity and problematic internet use. The results support the psychometric validity and utility of the WTSMQ and BWESQ for conducting cross-cultural research on binge-watching. [less ▲]

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See detailToo good to be cautious: High implicit self-esteem predicts self-reported dangerous mobile phone use
Lannoy, Séverine; Chatard, Armand; Selimbegovic, Leila et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2020), 103

Mobile phone use and misuse have become a pressing challenge in today's society. Dangerous mobile phone use, such as the use of a mobile phone while driving, is widely practiced, though banned in several ... [more ▼]

Mobile phone use and misuse have become a pressing challenge in today's society. Dangerous mobile phone use, such as the use of a mobile phone while driving, is widely practiced, though banned in several jurisdictions. Research aiming at unfolding the psychological predictors of dangerous mobile phone use have so far been scarce. Especially, researchers have never taken the role of self-esteem into account, which is unfortunate given prior research linking self-esteem to addictive mobile phone use. In the present study, we evaluated the associations between both explicit and implicit self-esteem and dangerous mobile phone use, with a particular focus on phoning while driving. To do so, we assessed implicit self-esteem among 95 participants (89 females) via the Implicit Association Test and explicit self-esteem via a self-reported measure. Problematic mobile phone use and demographic data were assessed with self-reported measures. Implicit self-esteem predicted dangerous mobile phone use, even after we controlled for demographic data and mobile phone dependence. Explicit self-esteem, however, was related to neither dependence nor dangerous use of the mobile phone, thereby supporting the importance of distinguishing between explicit and implicit self-esteem. Our results set the scene for new research avenues regarding mobile phone use while driving. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Acceptable Is This? How User Experience Factors Can Broaden our Understanding of the Acceptance of Privacy Trade-Offs
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019)

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits ... [more ▼]

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits of a technology or a service. This study builds on both technology acceptance (TA) and user experience (UX) research in order to explore and build hypotheses regarding additional dimensions that might play a role in the acceptability of privacy tradeoffs that are not currently accounted for in TA models. Using four scenarios describing situations with potential privacy trade-offs, we conducted a focus group study with 8 groups of participants (N = 32). Our results suggest that factors influencing privacy trade-offs go beyond existing TA factors alone. A technology's perceived usefulness plays an important role, as well as dimensions related to context, previous experiences, perceived autonomy and the feeling of control over the data being shared. [less ▲]

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See detailUnfair play? Video games as exploitative monetized services: An examination of game patents from a consumer protection perspective
King, Daniel L.; Delfabbro, Paul H.; Gainsbury, Sally M. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019), 101

ABSTRACT Video games as a consumer product have changed significantly with the advent of in-game purchasing systems (e.g., microtransactions, ‘loot boxes’). This review examines consumer protections ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Video games as a consumer product have changed significantly with the advent of in-game purchasing systems (e.g., microtransactions, ‘loot boxes’). This review examines consumer protections related to in-game purchasing by anticipating some of the potential design strategies that might contribute to higher risk consumer behavior. Attention was directed towards the analysis of patents for potential in-game purchasing systems, with 13 identified on Google Patents. The design features were analysed in relation to the consumer rights and guarantees described in the terms of use agreements of the patent assignees. The analysis revealed that some in-game purchasing systems could be characterized as unfair or exploitative. These systems describe tactics that capitalize on informational advantages (e.g., behavioral tracking) and data manipulation (e.g., price manipulation) to optimize offers to incentivize continuous spending, while offering limited or no guarantees or protections (e.g., refund entitlement), with the potential to exploit vulnerable players (e.g., adolescents, problematic gamers). These findings are critically discussed in relation to behavioral economics, addiction psychology, and the clinical conceptualization of gaming disorder. Appropriate policy and consumer protection measures, psychologically informed interventions, and ethical game design guidelines are needed in order to protect the interests and wellbeing of consumers. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing binge-watching behaviors: Development and validation of the “Watching TV Series Motives” and “Binge-Watching Engagement and Symptoms” questionnaires
Flayelle, Maèva UL; Canale, Natale; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019), 90

The widespread practice of binge-watching (i.e. watching multiple episodes of a TV series in one session) recently generated concerns about associated negative outcomes. Its psychological investigation ... [more ▼]

The widespread practice of binge-watching (i.e. watching multiple episodes of a TV series in one session) recently generated concerns about associated negative outcomes. Its psychological investigation, however, remains fragmentary. Based on the previous phenomenological investigation of TV series watching, we developed and validated two original assessment instruments, assessing TV series watching motives and binge-watching engagement and symptoms, respectively. Preliminary items were created for each questionnaire, and a focus group with TV series viewers was conducted and analyzed to generate the final instruments. The questionnaires were then administered via an online survey (N=6556), together with complementary measures of affect, problematic Internet use and substance use. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, along with correlational analyses, were performed to examine both structural and external validity of the scales. The factorial analyses resulted in a 4-factor model (i.e. emotional enhancement, enrichment, coping-escapism and social) for the Watching TV Series Motives Questionnaire (WTSMQ), and in a 7-factor model (i.e. engagement, positive emotions, desire-savoring, pleasure preservation, binge-watching, dependency and loss of control) for the Binge-Watching Engagement and Symptoms Questionnaire (BWESQ). The results suggest good psychometric properties for both scales. The current study thus provides theoretically-driven and psychometrically sound instruments for further research on binge-watching behaviors [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic smartphone use: An empirically validated model
Pivetta, Erika; Harkin, Lydia; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019), 100

Given the prominent role that smartphones have in everyday life, research in the field has proliferated. From a theoretical perspective, problematic smartphone use (PSPU) is described as a multi-faceted ... [more ▼]

Given the prominent role that smartphones have in everyday life, research in the field has proliferated. From a theoretical perspective, problematic smartphone use (PSPU) is described as a multi-faceted phenomenon entailing a variety of dysfunctional manifestations (e.g., addictive, antisocial and dangerous use). To date, however, there is still a lack of empirical evidence supporting the identification of PSPU as a potential behavioural addiction. Driven by theory, the aim of the present study was to provide an empirically validated model by testing the contribution of specific factors leading to PSPU. Relationships among individual characteristics (internalised psychopathology, impulsivity and personality traits) and PSPU uses (addictive, antisocial and dangerous) were investigated according to the updated version of the theoretical framework provided by the Pathway Model of problematic smartphone use (Billieux et al., 2015). An online survey was administered to a convenience sample (N = 511) of smartphone users in order to examine their daily engagement, problematic usage patterns and related psychological correlates. Path analysis revealed important information about different PSPU components and results are discussed in light of the available literature. Recommendations for future research are proposed to further investigate the problematic behaviour, including the study of additional variables, such as the fear of missing out (FoMO), nomophobia and excessive social media use. [less ▲]

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See detailShoot at First Sight! First Person Shooter Players Display Reduced Reaction Time and Compromised Inhibitory Control in Comparison to Other Video Game Players
Deleuze, Jory; Christiaens, Maxime; Nuyens, Filip et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017), 72

Studies have shown that regular video games use might improve cognitive and social skills. In contrast, other studies have documented the negative outcomes of excessive gaming vis-à-vis health and ... [more ▼]

Studies have shown that regular video games use might improve cognitive and social skills. In contrast, other studies have documented the negative outcomes of excessive gaming vis-à-vis health and socioprofessional spheres. Both positive and negative outcomes of video game use were linked to their structural characteristics (i.e., features that make the game appealing or are inducements for all gamers to keep playing regularly). The current study tested whether active video gamers from main genres (massively multiplayer online role-playing games, online first person shooter, multiplayer online battle arena) differed in a laboratory task that measured inhibitory control. Eighty-one gamers performed the Hybrid-Stop Task, assessing restraint (go/no-go trials) and cancellation (stop-signal trials) processes of a prepotent response. They completed additional self-reported questionnaires measuring demographics, problematic video game use, impulsivity traits, and depressive symptoms. Results showed that when confounding variables were controlled for, participants whose favorite game is online first person shooter were characterized by accelerated motor responses yet reduced abilities to cancel a prepotent response. No differences between groups were identified regarding the restraint process. The findings of this pilot study might have clear implications for video gaming research by supporting the critical importance of distinguishing between video game genres when considering their specific potential benefits and detrimental effects [less ▲]

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See detailCritical discussion of the special issue current innovations in computer-based assessment.
Greiff, Samuel UL; Scherer, Ronny; Kirschner, Paul A.

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017), 76

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See detailEditorial to the special issue current innovations in computer-based assessment.
Scherer, Ronny; Greiff, Samuel UL; Kirschner, Paul A.

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017), 76

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See detailCurrent innovations in computer-based assessment. Special issue.
Scherer, Ronny; Greiff, Samuel UL; Kirschner, Paul A.

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017)

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See detailSchizotypal personality traits and problematic use of massively-multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs)
Schimmenti, Adriano; Infanti, Alexandre; Badoud, Déborah et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017), 74

A link between maladaptive personality traits and an excessive use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) has been documented. However, the role of schizotypal personality traits in ... [more ▼]

A link between maladaptive personality traits and an excessive use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) has been documented. However, the role of schizotypal personality traits in MMORPG use is understudied. The aim of this study was to explore the potential links between schizotypal traits, motivations for playing MMORPGs, and symptoms of problematic MMORPG use. Eighty-three MMORPG gamers were enrolled in the study. They filled out questionnaires measuring schizotypal personality traits and an adapted version of the same scale designed to measure in-game schizotypal traits. All participants also filled out questionnaires assessing motivations for gaming and disordered use of MMORPGs. Results of the study showed that the disorganized and interpersonal traits of schizotypy decreased when participants were thinking about themselves in the virtual world. Schizotypal traits, together with achievement and immersion motives, predicted problematic use of MMORPGs. The findings of this study may suggest that schizotypal traits and motivations for playing can interact and play a relevant role in the onset and maintenance of problematic gaming [less ▲]

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See detailMay I teach you? Students' behavior when lectured by robotic vs. human teachers
Fernández-Llamas, C.; Conde, M. A.; Rodriguez Lera, Francisco Javier UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2017)

\textcopyright 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Social robots have been and are currently being used in many projects, research initiatives and experiments, but we know relatively little about them compared to humans ... [more ▼]

\textcopyright 2017 Elsevier Ltd. Social robots have been and are currently being used in many projects, research initiatives and experiments, but we know relatively little about them compared to humans when performing a social task such as teaching. Using an experiment in which a robot and a human teacher were used for teaching computational concepts to a group of K-12 students, the main goal of this paper is not to analyze the scores obtained in the post-test performed, but to focus on the students' attitudes towards robots. In order to do this, a version of the NARS and RAS questionnaires, adapted for children, was used. The analysis of the results of these questionnaires considers differences between age groups and students lectured by a robot vs. a human teacher. We conclude that age is the main factor that affects students' attitudes towards robots, although we also found other differences between the robot and the human teacher group. [less ▲]

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See detailHome alone: Complex problem solving performance bene fi ts from individual online assessment
Schult, Johannes; Stadler, Matthias UL; Becker, Nicolas et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016)

Computer-based assessments of complex problem solving performance often take place in group settings like classrooms and computer laboratories. Such computer-based procedures provide an excellent ... [more ▼]

Computer-based assessments of complex problem solving performance often take place in group settings like classrooms and computer laboratories. Such computer-based procedures provide an excellent opportunity to examine setting effects that might occur while participants are tested in a non-group session online at a time and place of their own choosing. For this purpose, N = 273 teacher students were randomly assigned to one of two settings: the individual online condition (n=216) or the computer laboratory group condition (n=57). Strong factorial measurement invariance was evidenced. Participants performed significantly better in the individual online condition than in the group condition (knowledge acquisition:d=0.38; knowledge application: d=0.39). The worse performance in the group setting compared to the individual setting could neither be explained by exploration time, nor by time on task. The internal experimental design validity strengthens the conclusion that setting-related differences in cognitive ability testing are not negligible but noteworthy. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring problem solving skills via stealth assessment in an engaging video game
Shute, Valerie J.; Wang, Lubin; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 63

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See detailTrick with treat – Reciprocity increases the willingness to communicate personal data
Happ, Christian; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016)

Information security is a significant challenge for information and communication technologies (ICT). This includes withstanding attempts of social engineering aimed at manipulating people into divulging ... [more ▼]

Information security is a significant challenge for information and communication technologies (ICT). This includes withstanding attempts of social engineering aimed at manipulating people into divulging confidential information. However, many users are lacking awareness of the risks involved. In a field survey that tested reciprocal behavior in social interactions, 1208 participants were asked to reveal their personal password. In line with the social norm of reciprocity, more than one third of the participants were willing to do so when they received a small incentive. Elicitation was even more successful when the incentive was given right before asking for the password. The results, including moderating factors (e.g., age, gender), are discussed in the light of security awareness of ICT users and the mechanisms of psychological persuasion. [less ▲]

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See detailOnline sexual activities: An exploratory study of problematic and non-problematic usage patterns in a sample of men
Wéry, A.; Billieux, Joël UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 56

Involvement in online sexual activities (OSAs) is ubiquitous, especially in males, and can under certain circumstances become problematic. The risk factors associated with problematic OSAs remain, however ... [more ▼]

Involvement in online sexual activities (OSAs) is ubiquitous, especially in males, and can under certain circumstances become problematic. The risk factors associated with problematic OSAs remain, however, poorly explored. The current study aimed to investigate the characteristics, usage patterns, and motives for men to engage in OSAs and to disentangle the risk factors associated with problematic OSAs. To this end, 434 men completed an online survey measuring socio-demographic information, OSAs consumption habits, motives for engaging in OSAs, symptoms of problematic OSAs, and sexual dysfunctions. Results showed that watching pornography is the most prevalent OSA, and sexual gratification is the most frequent motive for OSAs involvement. Additional multiple regression analyses indicated that the following characteristics are associated with problematic use of OSAs: (a) partnered-arousal activities (e.g., sex chat) and solitary-arousal activities (e.g., pornography); (b) anonymous fantasizing and mood regulation motives; and (c) higher sexual desire, lower overall sexual satisfaction, and lower erectile function. This study sheds new light on the characteristics, motives, and sexual function of men involved in OSAs, emphasizing that problematic OSAs are heterogeneous and depend on interrelated factors. The findings support tailoring of preventive actions and clinical interventions to both OSA type and individual risk factors. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEasily too difficult. Estimating item difficulty in computer simulated microworlds
Stadler, Matthias; Niepel, Christoph UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 65

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (4 UL)