References of "Comparative Sociology"
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See detailStill Great: Subjective Intergenerational Mobility and Income Inequality
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL

in Comparative Sociology (2018), 17(5), 496-518

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See detailMigration Background and Subjective Well-Being A Multilevel Analysis Based on the European Social Survey
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Backes, Susanne UL

in Comparative Sociology (2013), 12

Contributing to the debate on the integration of migrants in Europe, this study focuses on Subjective Well-Being (SWB) of people with migration backgrounds compared to people without a migration ... [more ▼]

Contributing to the debate on the integration of migrants in Europe, this study focuses on Subjective Well-Being (SWB) of people with migration backgrounds compared to people without a migration background – specifying SWB in terms of successful integration. The analyses employ a multilevel perspective (data base: European Social Survey). On the macro level, gross domestic product (GDP), welfare regime, xenophobia and the migrant integration policy index (MIPEX) are considered; on the micro level, social origin, education, unemployment, income deprivation, relationship status, health status and controls. Findings indicate a disadvantage in SWB of first-generation migrants that goes beyond deficits regarding well-studied SWB determinants. The SWB gap between migrants and nonmigrants is larger in countries with a high GDP and smaller in countries with a high MIPEX score. [less ▲]

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See detailChange in Disability Classification: Redrawing the Categorical Boundaries of Special Education in the U.S. and Germany, 1920–2005
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Comparative Sociology (2010), 9(2), 241267

How do we make sense of considerable cultural differences and change in disability classification? How are disability’s categorical boundaries being redrawn in the case of special education to realign with ... [more ▼]

How do we make sense of considerable cultural differences and change in disability classification? How are disability’s categorical boundaries being redrawn in the case of special education to realign with shifting paradigms of normality? Based in particular on the case of provided services to students “with special educational needs,” this analysis examines classification systems of student disability and their categorical boundaries in the United States and Germany. Sketching the origins and evolution of special education categories from 1920 to 2005, the comparison shows categorical boundaries have been redrawn, giving rise to new groups of students. [less ▲]

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