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See detailSingle-cell transcriptomics reveals multiple neuronal cell types in human midbrain-specific organoids
Smits, Lisa UL; Magni, Stefano UL; Kinugawa, Kaoru et al

in Cell and Tissue Research (2020)

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See detailComputational systems biology approaches for Parkinson's disease
Glaab, Enrico UL

in Cell and Tissue Research (2018), 373(1), 91109

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prime example of a complex and heterogeneous disorder, characterized by multifaceted and varied motor- and non-motor symptoms and different possible interplays of genetic and ... [more ▼]

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a prime example of a complex and heterogeneous disorder, characterized by multifaceted and varied motor- and non-motor symptoms and different possible interplays of genetic and environmental risk factors. While investigations of individual PD-causing mutations and risk factors in isolation are providing important insights to improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind PD, there is a growing consensus that a more complete understanding of these mechanisms will require an integrative modeling of multifactorial disease-associated perturbations in molecular networks. Identifying and interpreting the combinatorial effects of multiple PD-associated molecular changes may pave the way towards an earlier and reliable diagnosis and more effective therapeutic interventions. This review provides an overview of computational systems biology approaches developed in recent years to study multifactorial molecular alterations in complex disorders, with a focus on PD research applications. Strengths and weaknesses of different cellular pathway and network analyses, and multivariate machine learning techniques for investigating PD-related omics data are discussed, and strategies proposed to exploit the synergies of multiple biological knowledge and data sources. A final outlook provides an overview of specific challenges and possible next steps for translating systems biology findings in PD to new omics-based diagnostic tools and targeted, drug-based therapeutic approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailThe genetic architecture of mitochondrial dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease
Krüger, Rejko UL; Larsen, Simone UL; Hanss, Zoé UL

in Cell and Tissue Research (2018)

Mitochondrial impairment is a well-established pathological pathway implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Defects of the complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been found in post mortem ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial impairment is a well-established pathological pathway implicated in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Defects of the complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been found in post mortem brains from sporadic PD patients. Furthermore, several disease-related genes are linked to mitochondrial pathways, such as PRKN, PINK1, DJ-1 and HTRA2 and are associated to mitochondrial impairment. This phenotype can be caused by the dysfunction of mitochondrial quality control machinery at different levels: molecular, organellar or cellular. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response represents the molecular level and implicates various chaperones and proteases. If the molecular level of quality control is not sufficient, the organellar level is required and involves mitophagy and mitochondrial derived vesicles to sequester whole dysfunctional organelle or parts of it. Only when the impairment is too severe, it leads to cell death via apoptosis which defines the cellular level of quality control. Here we review how currently known PD-linked genetic variants interfere with the different levels of mitochondrial quality control. We discuss the graded risk concept of the most recently identified PARK loci (PARK 17-23) and some susceptibility variants such as GBA, LRRK2 and SNCA. Finally, the emerging concept of rare genetic variants as candidates for PD, such as HSPA9, TRAP1 and RHOT1 complete the picture of the complex genetic architecture of PD that will direct future precision medicine approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailLateralisation in Parkinson disease.
Riederer, P.; Jellinger, K. A.; Kolber, Pierre Luc UL et al

in Cell and tissue research (2018), 373(1), 297-312

Asymmetry of dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequent lateralisation of motor symptoms are distinctive features of Parkinson's disease compared to other forms of neurodegenerative or symptomatic ... [more ▼]

Asymmetry of dopaminergic neurodegeneration and subsequent lateralisation of motor symptoms are distinctive features of Parkinson's disease compared to other forms of neurodegenerative or symptomatic parkinsonism. Even 200 years after the first description of the disease, the underlying causes for this striking clinicopathological feature are not yet fully understood. There is increasing evidence that lateralisation of disease is due to a complex interplay of hereditary and environmental factors that are reflected not only in the concept of dominant hemispheres and handedness but also in specific susceptibilities of neuronal subpopulations within the substantia nigra. As a consequence, not only the obvious lateralisation of motor symptoms occurs but also patterns of associated non-motor signs are defined, which include cognitive functions, sleep behaviour or olfaction. Better understanding of the mechanisms contributing to lateralisation of neurodegeneration and the resulting patterns of clinical phenotypes based on bilateral post-mortem brain analyses and clinical studies focusing on right/left hemispheric symptom origin will help to develop more targeted therapeutic approaches, taking into account subtypes of PD as a heterogeneous disorder. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of synphilin-1 in synaptic function and protein degradation.
Krüger, Rejko UL

in Cell and Tissue Research (2004), 318(1), 195-9

The name synphilin-1 comes from its identification as an alpha-synuclein-interacting protein (SNCAIP) in yeast two-hybrid screens. Since alpha-synuclein ( PARK1) was the first gene identified as causing ... [more ▼]

The name synphilin-1 comes from its identification as an alpha-synuclein-interacting protein (SNCAIP) in yeast two-hybrid screens. Since alpha-synuclein ( PARK1) was the first gene identified as causing inherited forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), synphilin-1 was quickly implicated in neurodegeneration in PD. Recently, the first genetic evidence for the direct contribution of synphilin-1 in the pathogenesis of PD has been defined with the identification of an R621C mutation as a susceptibility factor for PD in two German patients. Extensive in vitro studies have determined the physiological functions of synphilin-1, identified novel synphilin-1-interacting proteins, and linked synphilin-1 to ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation. The present article provides an overview of the current concepts of the role of synphilin-1 in synaptic function and protein degradation and in the molecular mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuronal architecture of the central complex in Drosophila melanogaster
Hanesch, Ulrike UL; Fischbach, Karl-Friedrich; Heisenberg, Martin

in Cell and Tissue Research (1989), 257

Detailed reference viewed: 148 (2 UL)