References of "British Journal of Health Psychology"
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See detailThe coronavirus (COVID‐19) fatality risk perception of US adult residents in March and April 2020
Niepel, Christoph UL; Kranz, Dirk; Borgonovi, Francesca et al

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2020)

The study compares empirical results on the coronavirus SARS‐CoV‐2 (causing COVID‐19) fatality risk perception of US adult residents stratified for age, gender, and race in mid‐March 2020 (N1 = 1,182) and ... [more ▼]

The study compares empirical results on the coronavirus SARS‐CoV‐2 (causing COVID‐19) fatality risk perception of US adult residents stratified for age, gender, and race in mid‐March 2020 (N1 = 1,182) and mid‐April 2020 (N2 = 953). While the fatality risk perception has increased from March 2020 to April 2020, our findings suggest that many US adult residents severely underestimated their absolute and relative fatality risk (i.e., differentiated for subgroups defined by pre‐existing medical conditions and age) at both time points compared to current epidemiological figures. These results are worrying because risk perception, as our study indicates, relates to actual or intended health‐protective behaviour that can reduce SARS‐CoV‐2 transmission rates. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial comparison and anxious mood in pulmonary rehabilitation: The role of cognitive focus
Petersen, Sibylle UL; Taube, Karin; Lehmann, Kirsten et al

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2012), 17(3), 463-476

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See detailDependency of illness perception on the social comparison context: findings with implicit measurement of affective evaluation of asthma
Petersen, Sibylle UL; Ritz, Thomas

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2010), 15(2), 401-416

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See detailAffective evaluation and cognitive structure of respiratory sensations in healthy individuals
Petersen, Sibylle UL; von Leupoldt, Andreas; Morenings, Matthias et al

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2009), 14(4), 751-765

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See detailPsychophysiological effects of relaxation training in children
Lohaus, Arnold; Klein-Hessling, Johannes; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2001), 6

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and an imagery-based relaxation training on childrens' physiological and subjective responses in a randomized controlled trial ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and an imagery-based relaxation training on childrens' physiological and subjective responses in a randomized controlled trial. DESIGN: Sixty-four children aged 9 to 13 years were randomly allocated to either one of three experimental conditions: progressive muscle relaxation, imagery-based relaxation or a control condition (neutral story). There were five training sessions in each condition. METHOD: Heart rate (HR), skin conductance level (SCL), and skin temperature (ST) were measured continuously during a 5-minute baseline period, an 8-minute relaxation training period, and a 5-minute follow-up in each session. In addition, subjective ratings of mood and physical well-being were collected intermittently. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A physiological pattern indicating relaxation was most clearly associated with the imagery-based relaxation approach (decreases in HR and SCL), although ST remained unchanged. In contrast, progressive muscle relaxation led to an increase in HR during the training. The neutral story condition showed a similar trend as the imagery-based relaxation approach (although not reaching statistical significance). Furthermore, children's ratings of positive mood and physical wellbeing increased during baseline and training periods, but there were no differences between training conditions. The results indicate psychophysiological effects of relaxation instructions which, however, are not specific for systematic relaxation training. [less ▲]

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