References of "Biological Chemistry"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnification of functional annotation descriptions using text mining
Queirós, Pedro; Novikova, Polina UL; Wilmes, Paul UL et al

in Biological Chemistry (2021)

A common approach to genome annotation involves the use of homology-based tools for the prediction of the functional role of proteins. The quality of functional annotations is dependent on the reference ... [more ▼]

A common approach to genome annotation involves the use of homology-based tools for the prediction of the functional role of proteins. The quality of functional annotations is dependent on the reference data used, as such, choosing the appropriate sources is crucial. Unfortunately, no single reference data source can be universally considered the gold standard, thus using multiple references could potentially increase annotation quality and coverage. However, this comes with challenges, particularly due to the introduction of redundant and exclusive annotations. Through text mining it is possible to identify highly similar functional descriptions, thus strengthening the confidence of the final protein functional annotation and providing a redundancy-free output. Here we present UniFunc, a text mining approach that is able to detect similar functional descriptions with high precision. UniFunc was built as a small module and can be independently used or integrated into protein function annotation pipelines. By removing the need to individually analyse and compare annotation results, UniFunc streamlines the complementary use of multiple reference datasets. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA systematic comparison of two new releases of exome sequencing products: the aim of use determines the choice of product.
Altmuller, Janine; Motameny, Susanne; Becker, Christian et al

in Biological chemistry (2016), 397(8), 791-801

We received early access to the newest releases of exome sequencing products, namely Agilent SureSelect v6 (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and NimbleGen MedExome (Roche NimbleGen, Basel, Switzerland), and ... [more ▼]

We received early access to the newest releases of exome sequencing products, namely Agilent SureSelect v6 (Agilent, Santa Clara, CA, USA) and NimbleGen MedExome (Roche NimbleGen, Basel, Switzerland), and we conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) of several DNA samples with each of these products in order to assess their performance. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of the original, normalized (with respect to the different target sizes), and trimmed data sets and compare them in terms of the amount of duplicates, the reads on target, and the enrichment evenness. In addition to these general statistics, we performed a detailed analysis of the frequently mutated and newly described genes found in 'The Deciphering Developmental Disorders Study' published very recently (Fitzgerald, T.W., Gerety, S.S., Jones, W.D., van Kogelenberg, M., King, D.A., McRae, J., Morley, K.I., Parthiban, V., Al-Turki, S., Ambridge, K., et al. (2015). Large-scale discovery of novel genetic causes of developmental disorders. Nature 519, 223-228.). In our comparison, the Agilent v6 exome performs better than the NimbleGen's MedExome both in terms of efficiency and evenness of coverage distribution. With its larger target size, it is also more comprehensive, and therefore the better choice in research projects that aim to identify novel disease-associated genes. In contrast, if the exomes are mainly used in a diagnostic setting, we see advantages for the new NimbleGen MedExome. We find a superior coverage here in those genes of high clinical relevance that likely allows for a better detection of relevant, disease-causing mutations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrain tumor stem cells.
Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens Christian UL

in Biological Chemistry (2010), 391(6), 607-17

Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural ... [more ▼]

Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (4 UL)