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See detailHypoxia-induced Autophagy Drives Colorectal Cancer Initiation and Progression by Activating the PRKC/PKC-EZR (Ezrin) Pathway
Qureshi-Baig, Komal; Kuhn; Viry, Elodie et al

in Autophagy (2019)

In solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are often found in hypoxic niches. Nevertheless, the influence of hypoxia on TICs is poorly understood. Using previously ... [more ▼]

In solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are often found in hypoxic niches. Nevertheless, the influence of hypoxia on TICs is poorly understood. Using previously established, TIC-enriched patient-derived colorectal cancer (CRC) cultures, we show that hypoxia increases the self-renewal capacity of TICs while inducing proliferation arrest in their more differentiated counterpart cultures. Gene expression data revealed macroautophagy/autophagy as one of the major pathways induced by hypoxia in TICs. Interestingly, hypoxia-induced autophagy was found to induce phosphorylation of EZR (ezrin) at Thr567 residue, which could be reversed by knocking down ATG5, BNIP3, BNIP3L, or BECN1. Furthermore, we identified PRKCA/PKCα as a potential kinase involved in hypoxia-induced autophagy-mediated TIC self-renewal. Genetic targeting of autophagy or pharmacological inhibition of PRKC/PKC and EZR resulted in decreased tumor-initiating potential of TICs. In addition, we observed significantly reduced in vivo tumor initiation and growth after a stable knockdown of ATG5. Analysis of human CRC samples showed that p-EZR is often present in TICs located in the hypoxic and autophagic regions of the tumor. Altogether, our results establish the hypoxia-autophagy-PKC-EZR signaling axis as a novel regulatory mechanism of TIC self-renewal and CRC progression. Autophagy inhibition might thus represent a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer patients. [less ▲]

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See detailGuidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy (3rd edition)
Klionsky, D.; Krüger, Rejko UL; et al.

in Autophagy (2016), 12(1), 1-222

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See detailGuidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring autophagy.
Klionsky, Daniel J.; Abdalla, Fabio C.; Abeliovich, Hagai et al

in Autophagy (2012), 8(4), 445-544

In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field ... [more ▼]

In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. A key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process vs. those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process); thus, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation needs to be differentiated from stimuli that result in increased autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular autophagy assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field. [less ▲]

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