References of "Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUsing cohort data to emulate lifestyle interventions: Long-term beneficial effects of initiating physical activity on cognitive decline and dementia
Leist, Anja UL; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Solomon, Alina

in Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2020), 16

Background: Intervention studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of physical activity on cognitive decline and reduced risk of dementia. However, randomized controlled trial data of lifestyle ... [more ▼]

Background: Intervention studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of physical activity on cognitive decline and reduced risk of dementia. However, randomized controlled trial data of lifestyle interventions over long time spans are not available due to lack of resources, feasibility or ethical reasons. Drawing from the principles of emulating a ‘target trial’, which apply design principles of randomized trials to the analysis of observational data, cohort data of a large European survey were analyzed to understand the long-term effects of physical activity changes. Method: Biennial assessments of the economic, social, and health situation of respondents aged 50 and older came from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (2004-2017). Cognitive functioning (immediate recall, delayed recall, and verbal fluency) and self-reported diagnosis of dementia were assessed at each follow-up. The target trial included sedentary respondents at t1 who, at follow-up (t2), stayed sedentary (“control group”) or newly reported vigorous physical activity more often than once a week (initiators, “treatment group”). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were implemented as close as possible to those of the FINGER trial. Inverse-probability weighting accounted for the probability of initiating physical activity with a large set of predictor variables. Selecting respondents aged 50-85 years old who met the target trial inclusion and exclusion criteria, assessments of cognitive functioning and self-reported diagnosis of dementia were available for 8,781 respondents at t3 (on average 3.02 years later), 3,858 respondents at t4 (5.84 years), and 2,304 respondents at t5 (7.72 years). A total of 304 respondents reported a diagnosis of dementia. Result: Initiators of vigorous physical activity had higher cognitive functioning at two follow-ups compared to non-initiators (t3: “average treatment effect on the treated”, ATET=0.059, CI: 0.028, 0.090), which remained significant after implementing inclusion and exclusion criteria. Initiators had lower risk of dementia compared to non-initiators at all three follow-ups (t3: ATET=-0.009, CI: -0.015, -0.005, relative risk decrease -46.7%), remaining significant after implementing inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusion: Emulating a target trial showed long-term benefits of initiating physical activity for cognitive functioning and dementia risk. Multidomain interventions related to nutrition, social, cognitive activities etc. can be similarly emulated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrevalence of memory impairment 2000-2015 in Sao Paolo, Brazil
Ribeiro, Fabiana UL; de Oliveira Duarte, Yeda; Santos, Jair Licio Ferreira et al

in Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2020), 16

Background: Decreases in prevalence of memory impairment and dementia over the last two decades have been observed in different countries for cohorts entering older age. We sought to explore the changes ... [more ▼]

Background: Decreases in prevalence of memory impairment and dementia over the last two decades have been observed in different countries for cohorts entering older age. We sought to explore the changes in prevalence of cognitive impairment across four waves of the Health, Welfare and Aging survey (SABE) with data collected in Sao Paolo, Brazil, in 2000, 2006, 2010, and 2015. Method: Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores and covariate values were available for 5,191 respondents (62.4% female) aged 60 to 99 across four waves. Cognitive impairment was defined as having <=12 points on a 19-point abbreviated version of the MMSE. Age group, educational attainment (no formal schooling, primary, secondary, post-secondary), self-reported heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, and BMI (<18.5, 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, 30+) were adjusted for. Result: In more recent waves, prevalence of cognitive impairment was higher for respondents aged 60-64 years (9.0% in 2015 vs. 4.6% in 2000), 65-69 years (9.7% in 2015 vs. 5.8% in 2006) and 70-74 years (13.9% in 2015 vs. 5.8% in 2006). Between 2015 and 2000, respondents were increasingly more likely to report some formal education (90.8% vs. 75.3%), secondary (17.6% vs. 7.3%) or postsecondary education (11.4% vs. 4.3%). Respondents were increasingly more likely to report hypertension (66.5% vs. 54.2%), diabetes (28.7% vs. 17.8%), and be overweight/obese (74.1% vs. 58.9%). In age-adjusted logistic regressions, respondents in 2015 were more likely to show cognitive impairment compared to 2000 (OR 1.84, CI 1.20-2.82). Conclusion: SABE respondents showed higher prevalence of cognitive impairment in 2015 compared to respondents of the same age in earlier waves, but differences disappeared after adjusting for chronic disease burden and educational attainment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMulticenter Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease immune biomarker verification study
Brosseron, Federic; Schneider, Reinhard UL

in Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2019)

Multiple immunity biomarkers have been suggested as tracers of neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration. This study aimed to verify findings in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD ... [more ▼]

Multiple immunity biomarkers have been suggested as tracers of neuroinflammation in neurodegeneration. This study aimed to verify findings in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects from the network of the European, Innovative Medicines Initiative–funded project AETIONOMY. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (3 UL)