References of "Addiction Research and Theory"
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See detailA joint exploration of executive subcomponents in binge drinking
Lannoy, Séverine; Dormal, Valérie; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Addiction Research and Theory (2019), 27(6), 498-506

Background: Executive deficits have been largely reported in young binge drinkers during the last decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the specificity of these deficits and their variation across ... [more ▼]

Background: Executive deficits have been largely reported in young binge drinkers during the last decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the specificity of these deficits and their variation across executive subcomponents. The current study aimed at offering a theoretically-grounded and specific exploration of the differential deficits observed across executive functions in binge drinkers. Method: A total of forty university students (20 binge drinkers; 10 women, and 20 matched controls; 12 women) performed three validated neuropsychological tasks, each exploring a specific executive function, namely shifting, updating, and inhibition (specifically Resistance to Distractor Interference). Tasks were presented to participants in pseudo-randomized order. Repeated measure analyses of variance were performed for each task to compare groups’ performance. Results: A dissociation was observed across executive tasks regarding group differences: compared to controls, binge drinkers demonstrated preserved performance for shifting and updating abilities, but impaired inhibition. These results support the central role of inhibitory control in excessive alcohol consumption. In contrast with severe alcohol-use disorders, binge drinking does not appear related to a general executive deficit. Conclusions: In view of the pivotal role played by inhibition impairments in the emergence of severe alcohol-use disorders, the present data claim for developing individualized evaluation and rehabilitation programs focusing on this executive subcomponent to improve control abilities at early stages of alcohol-related disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailBinge drinking is characterized by decisions favoring positive and discounting negative consequences  
Bø, Ragnhild; Billieux, Joël UL; Landrø, Nils Inge

in Addiction Research and Theory (2016), 24(6), 499-506

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See detailAlcohol warning labels formulated as questions change alcohol-related outcome expectancies: A pilot study
Krischler, Mireille UL; Glock, Sabine

in Addiction Research and Theory (2015)

Alcohol consumption is a leading risk factor for major diseases, particularly among young adults who increasingly engage in binge drinking. Since positive outcome expectancies play a pivotal role in ... [more ▼]

Alcohol consumption is a leading risk factor for major diseases, particularly among young adults who increasingly engage in binge drinking. Since positive outcome expectancies play a pivotal role in alcohol consumption, we designed alcohol warning labels tailored toward young adults’ outcome expectancies. The warnings were formulated as questions or as statements that were accompanied by a picture. We implemented the warning labels on young adults’ favorite alcohol beverages (beer and alcopops) and presented them in the laboratory. One-hundred twenty-two young adults participated in the study. One third of the sample received the warning labels in question form, one third in statement form, and the final third received no warning labels. We assessed general outcome expectancies, individual outcome expectancies derived from a pre-study, and drinking intentions. The results of this experiment revealed that warning labels presented as statements had no influence on individual and general outcome expectancies and drinking intentions. Warnings posed in the form of questions showed some effectiveness as they increased individual negative outcome expectancy perception. Although only partially effective, the warning labels seem promising for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailPleasure and Excess: Using Georges Bataille to Locate an absent pleasure of consumption
Schnuer, Gregor UL

in Addiction Research and Theory (2012), Early Online

This article will engage with some recent changes in addiction discourses and research in order to introduce a new version of pleasure. Looking at how addiction research has reframed the ‘addict’ as a ... [more ▼]

This article will engage with some recent changes in addiction discourses and research in order to introduce a new version of pleasure. Looking at how addiction research has reframed the ‘addict’ as a socially situated and contingent ‘consumer’, I will try to understand the role of excess in the distinction between ‘normal’ and ‘problematic’ consumption. This distinction remains prevalent, even in recent works on pleasure and drug-use. Pleasure is crucial here, because it is intimately related to consumption, yet has been previously ignored in research. Whereas the previous distinguishing feature of ‘addict’ and ‘non-addict’ can be argued to have been one of ‘production’ and ‘consumption’ (alongside a whole list of other attributes), the current debate seems to focus on various forms of consumption – the pursuit of pleasure through consumption being contentious. I argue that Bataille’s formulation of overwhelming pleasure offers a way of combining excess and pleasure in a manner that is not problematic, further breaking down the distinction between ‘normal’ and ‘abnormal’ consumption. However, at the same time a new dichotomy is created between ‘overwhelming’ and ‘purposive’ pleasure, a distinction that might offer new ways of distinguishing ‘problematic’ and ‘unproblematic’ consumption in relation to druguse. The version of pleasure formulated is argued to be absent in current work looking at pleasure in addiction, and a valuable addition to the growing repertoire of the types of pleasure available to addiction research. [less ▲]

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