References of "ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces"
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See detailInterdiffusion and Doping Gradients at the Buffer/Absorber Interface in Thin-Film Solar Cells
Werner, Florian UL; Babbe, Finn UL; Burkhart, Jan UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2018), 10

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See detailScanning Probe Photonic Nanojet Lithography
Jacassi, Andrea; Tantussi, Francesco; Dipalo, Michele et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2017), 9(37), 32386-32393

The use of nano/microspheres or beads for optical nanolithography is a consolidated technique for achieving subwavelength structures using a cost-effective approach; this method exploits the capability of ... [more ▼]

The use of nano/microspheres or beads for optical nanolithography is a consolidated technique for achieving subwavelength structures using a cost-effective approach; this method exploits the capability of the beads to focus electromagnetic waves into subwavelength beams called photonic nanojets, which are used to expose the photoresist on which the beads are placed. However, this technique has only been used to produce regular patterns based on the spatial arrangement of the beads on the substrate, thus considerably limiting the pool of applications. Here, we present a novel microsphere-based optical lithography technique that offers high subwavelength resolution and the possibility of generating any arbitrary pattern. The presented method consists of a single microsphere embedded in an AFM cantilever, which can be controlled using the AFM motors to write arbitrary patterns with subwavelength resolution (down to 290 nm with a 405 nm laser). The performance of the proposed technique can compete with those of commercial high-resolution standard instruments, with the advantage of a one-order-of-magnitude reduction in costs. This approach paves the way for direct integration of cost-effective, high-resolution optical lithography capabilities into several existing AFM systems. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial control of laser-induced doping profiles in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride
Neumann, Christoph; Rizzi, Leo; Reichardt, Sven UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2016), 8(14), 9377-9383

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See detailInfluence of Wetting on Morphology and Core Content in Electrospun Core-Sheath Fibers
Kim, Dae Kyom; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2014), 6(18), 16441-16447

Coaxial electrospinning allows easy and cost-effective realization of composite fibers at the nano- and microscales. Different multifunctional materials can be incorporated with distinct localization to ... [more ▼]

Coaxial electrospinning allows easy and cost-effective realization of composite fibers at the nano- and microscales. Different multifunctional materials can be incorporated with distinct localization to specific regimes of the fiber cross section and extended internal interfaces. However, the final composite properties are affected by variations in internal structure, morphology, and material separation, and thus, nanoscale control is mandatory for high-performance application in devices. Here, we present an analysis with unprecedented detail of the cross section of liquid core-functionalized fibers, yielding information that is difficult to reveal. This is based on focused ion beam (FIB) lift-out and allowing HR-TEM imaging of the fibers together with nanoscale resolution chemical analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unexpectedly, core material escapes during spinning and ends up coating the fiber exterior and target substrate. For high core injection rate, a dramatic difference in fiber morphology is found, depending on whether the surface on which the fibers are deposited is hydrophobic or hydrophilic. The latter enhances postspinning extraction of core fluid, resulting in the loss of the functional material and collapsed fiber morphology. Finally, in situ produced TiO2 nanoparticles dispersed in the polymer appear strikingly different when the core fluid is present compared to when the polymer solution is spun on its own. [less ▲]

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