References of "ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces"
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See detailCo-evaporation of CH3NH3PbI3: How Growth Conditions Impact Phase Purity, Photostriction, and Intrinsic Stability
Gallet, Thibaut UL; Goncalinho Poeira, Ricardo Jorge UL; Martin Lanzoni, Evandro UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2021), 13(2), 26422653

Hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites are highly promising candidates for the upcoming generation of single- and multijunction solar cells. Despite their extraordinarily good semiconducting properties ... [more ▼]

Hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites are highly promising candidates for the upcoming generation of single- and multijunction solar cells. Despite their extraordinarily good semiconducting properties, there is a need to increase the intrinsic material stability against heat, moisture, and light exposure. Understanding how variations in synthesis affect the bulk and surface stability is therefore of paramount importance to achieve a rapid commercialization on large scales. In this work, we show for the case of methylammonium lead iodide that a thorough control of the methylammonium iodide (MAI) partial pressure during co-evaporation is essential to limit photostriction and reach phase purity, which dictate the absorber stability. Kelvin probe force microscopy measurements in ultrahigh vacuum corroborate that off-stoichiometric absorbers prepared with an excess of MAI partial pressure exhibit traces of low-dimensional (two-dimensional, 2D) perovskites and stacking faults that have adverse effects on the intrinsic material stability. Under optimized growth conditions, time-resolved photoluminescence and work functions mapping corroborate that the perovskite films are less prone to heat and light degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailLow-Temperature Growth of AlN Films on Magnetostrictive Foils for High-Magnetoelectric-Response Thin-Film Composites
Nguyen, T.; Fleming, Y.; Bender, P. et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2021), 13

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See detailWaste- and Cd-Free Inkjet-Printed Zn(O,S) Buffer for Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Thin-Film Solar Cells
Chu, van Ben UL; Siopa, Daniel UL; Debot, Alice UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2021), 13

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See detailDisruption of Electrospinning due to Water Condensation into the Taylor Cone.
Reyes, C. G.; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2020), 12(23), 26566--26576

The well-known problems of electrospinning hygroscopic polymer fibers in humid air are usually attributed to water condensing onto the jet mid-flight: water enters the jet as an additional solvent ... [more ▼]

The well-known problems of electrospinning hygroscopic polymer fibers in humid air are usually attributed to water condensing onto the jet mid-flight: water enters the jet as an additional solvent, hindering solidification into well-defined fibers. Here, we show that fiber fusion and shape loss seen at the end of the process may actually stem from water already condensing into the Taylor cone from where the jet ejects, if the solvent is volatile and miscible with water, for example, ethanol. The addition of water can radically change the solvent character from good to poor, even if water on its own is an acceptable solvent. Moreover, and counterintuitively, the water condensation promotes solvent evaporation because of the release of heat through the phase transition as well as from the exothermic mixing process. The overall result is that the polymer solution develops a gel-like skin around the Taylor cone. The situation is significantly aggravated in the case of coaxial electrospinning to make functional composite fibers if the injected core fluid forms a complex phase diagram with miscibility gaps together with the polymer sheath solvent and the water condensing from the air. The resulting phase separation coagulates the polymer throughout the Taylor cone, as liquid droplets with different compositions nucleate and spread, setting up strong internal flows and concentration gradients. We demonstrate that these cases of uncontrolled polymer coagulation cause rapid Taylor cone deformation, multiple jet ejection, and the inability to spin coaxial fiber mats, illustrated by the example of coaxial electrospinning of an ethanolic polyvinylpyrrolidone solution with a thermotropic liquid crystal core, at varying humidities. [less ▲]

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See detailInterdiffusion and Doping Gradients at the Buffer/Absorber Interface in Thin-Film Solar Cells
Werner, Florian UL; Babbe, Finn UL; Burkhart, Jan UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2018), 10

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See detailScanning Probe Photonic Nanojet Lithography
Jacassi, Andrea; Tantussi, Francesco; Dipalo, Michele et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2017), 9(37), 32386-32393

The use of nano/microspheres or beads for optical nanolithography is a consolidated technique for achieving subwavelength structures using a cost-effective approach; this method exploits the capability of ... [more ▼]

The use of nano/microspheres or beads for optical nanolithography is a consolidated technique for achieving subwavelength structures using a cost-effective approach; this method exploits the capability of the beads to focus electromagnetic waves into subwavelength beams called photonic nanojets, which are used to expose the photoresist on which the beads are placed. However, this technique has only been used to produce regular patterns based on the spatial arrangement of the beads on the substrate, thus considerably limiting the pool of applications. Here, we present a novel microsphere-based optical lithography technique that offers high subwavelength resolution and the possibility of generating any arbitrary pattern. The presented method consists of a single microsphere embedded in an AFM cantilever, which can be controlled using the AFM motors to write arbitrary patterns with subwavelength resolution (down to 290 nm with a 405 nm laser). The performance of the proposed technique can compete with those of commercial high-resolution standard instruments, with the advantage of a one-order-of-magnitude reduction in costs. This approach paves the way for direct integration of cost-effective, high-resolution optical lithography capabilities into several existing AFM systems. [less ▲]

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See detailSpatial control of laser-induced doping profiles in graphene on hexagonal boron nitride
Neumann, Christoph; Rizzi, Leo; Reichardt, Sven UL et al

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2016), 8(14), 9377-9383

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See detailInfluence of Wetting on Morphology and Core Content in Electrospun Core-Sheath Fibers
Kim, Dae Kyom; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2014), 6(18), 16441-16447

Coaxial electrospinning allows easy and cost-effective realization of composite fibers at the nano- and microscales. Different multifunctional materials can be incorporated with distinct localization to ... [more ▼]

Coaxial electrospinning allows easy and cost-effective realization of composite fibers at the nano- and microscales. Different multifunctional materials can be incorporated with distinct localization to specific regimes of the fiber cross section and extended internal interfaces. However, the final composite properties are affected by variations in internal structure, morphology, and material separation, and thus, nanoscale control is mandatory for high-performance application in devices. Here, we present an analysis with unprecedented detail of the cross section of liquid core-functionalized fibers, yielding information that is difficult to reveal. This is based on focused ion beam (FIB) lift-out and allowing HR-TEM imaging of the fibers together with nanoscale resolution chemical analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unexpectedly, core material escapes during spinning and ends up coating the fiber exterior and target substrate. For high core injection rate, a dramatic difference in fiber morphology is found, depending on whether the surface on which the fibers are deposited is hydrophobic or hydrophilic. The latter enhances postspinning extraction of core fluid, resulting in the loss of the functional material and collapsed fiber morphology. Finally, in situ produced TiO2 nanoparticles dispersed in the polymer appear strikingly different when the core fluid is present compared to when the polymer solution is spun on its own. [less ▲]

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