References of "PAIN"
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See detailAttentional bias to pain-related information: a meta-analysis.
Crombez, Geert; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Eccleston, Christopher et al

in Pain (2013), 154(4), 497-510

This meta-analysis investigated whether attentional bias, that is, the preferential allocation of attention to information that is related to pain, is a ubiquitous phenomenon. We also investigated whether ... [more ▼]

This meta-analysis investigated whether attentional bias, that is, the preferential allocation of attention to information that is related to pain, is a ubiquitous phenomenon. We also investigated whether attentional bias effects are related to the methodological quality of the study, to procedural differences in their measurement, or to individual differences in pain severity, pain-related fear, anxiety, and depression. Results indicated that individuals who experience chronic pain (n=1023) display an attentional bias towards pain-related words or pictures, but this bias was of a small effect size (d=0.134), and did not differ from that in control groups (d=0.082; n=1398). No evidence was found for an attentional bias towards pain-related words and pictures for acute pain (d=0.049), procedural pain (d=0.142), and experimental pain (d=0.069). However, research in which attentional bias towards signals of impending experimental pain in healthy volunteers was investigated, revealed an attentional bias of medium effect size (d=0.676). Moderator analyses in the chronic pain group identified important procedural variables that affected the presence and magnitude of an attentional bias towards pain-related words and pictures, that is, type and exposure time of pain-related information. None of the individual difference variables affected the magnitude of the attentional bias. Implications of current findings and future directions are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 454 (1 UL)
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See detailAttentional bias towards pain-related information diminishes the efficacy of distraction.
Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Crombez, Geert; Van Hulle, Lore et al

in Pain (2012), 153(12), 2345-51

Distraction is a strategy that is commonly used to cope with pain. Results concerning the efficacy of distraction from both experimental and clinical studies are variable, however, and indicate that its ... [more ▼]

Distraction is a strategy that is commonly used to cope with pain. Results concerning the efficacy of distraction from both experimental and clinical studies are variable, however, and indicate that its efficacy may depend on particular circumstances. Several models propose that distraction may be less effective for people who display a large attentional bias towards pain-related information. This hypothesis was tested in an experimental context with 53 pain-free volunteers. First, attentional bias towards cues signalling the occurrence of pain (electrocutaneous stimuli) and towards words describing the sensory experience of this painful stimulus was independently assessed by means of 2 behavioural paradigms (respectively, spatial cueing task and dot-probe task). This was followed by a subsequent distraction task during which the efficacy of distraction, by directing attention away from the electrocutaneous stimuli, was tested. In addition, state-trait anxiety, catastrophic thinking, and initial pain intensity were measured. Results indicated that people who display a large attentional bias towards predictive cues of pain or who initially experience the pain as more painful benefit less from distraction on a subsequent test. No effects were found between attentional bias towards pain words, state-trait anxiety, catastrophic thinking, and the efficacy of distraction. Current findings suggest that distraction should not be used as a 'one size fits all' method to control pain, but only under more specific conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailExperimental characterization of the effects of acute stresslike doses of hydrocortisone in human neurogenic hyperlagesia models
Michaux, Gilles; Magerl, Walter; Anton, Fernand UL et al

in Pain (2012), 153(2), 420-428

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (0 UL)
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See detailNo pain no gain? Pursuing a competing goal inhibits avoidance behavior.
Van Damme, Stefaan; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Wyffels, Fran et al

in Pain (2012), 153(4), 800-4

This experiment investigated pain-related avoidance behavior in context of competing goals. Participants (N=56) were presented trials of 2 different tasks of which 1 task could produce pain. They were ... [more ▼]

This experiment investigated pain-related avoidance behavior in context of competing goals. Participants (N=56) were presented trials of 2 different tasks of which 1 task could produce pain. They were free to decide whether or not to perform trials of these tasks. In half of the participants, a competing goal was activated by instructing them that they would receive a monetary reward corresponding to the number of pain task trials actually performed (competition group). In the other half of the participants, no competing goal was installed (control group). Results showed that the competition group showed less frequent avoidance behavior than the control group. Furthermore, the association between pain-related avoidance behavior and fear of pain was smaller in the competition group than in the control group. The findings indicate that the emergence of pain-related avoidance behavior depends upon the motivational context, and that the association between pain-related fear and avoidance is not stable. This study has implications for our understanding of disability, and points to the need to consider avoidance behavior within a broad context of multiple, often competing, goals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (1 UL)
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See detailWhen you dislike patients, pain is taken less seriously.
De Ruddere, Lies; Goubert, Liesbet; Prkachin, Ken Martin et al

in Pain (2011), 152(10), 2342-7

This study examined the influence of patients' likability on pain estimations made by observers. Patients' likability was manipulated by means of an evaluative conditioning procedure: pictures of patients ... [more ▼]

This study examined the influence of patients' likability on pain estimations made by observers. Patients' likability was manipulated by means of an evaluative conditioning procedure: pictures of patients were combined with either positive, neutral, or negative personal traits. Next, videos of the patients were presented to 40 observers who rated the pain. Patients were expressing no, mild-, or high-intensity pain. Results indicated lower pain estimations as well as lower perceptual sensitivity toward pain (i.e., lower ability to discriminate between varying levels of pain expression) with regard to patients who were associated with negative personal traits. The effect on pain estimations was only found with regard to patients expressing high-intensity pain. There was no effect on response bias (i.e., the overall tendency to indicate pain). These findings suggest that we take the pain of patients we do not like less seriously than the pain of patients we like. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (1 UL)
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See detailThe role of motivation in distracting attention away from pain: an experimental study.
Verhoeven, Katrien; Crombez, Geert; Eccleston, Christopher et al

in Pain (2010), 149(2), 229-34

Research on the effectiveness of distraction as a method of pain control is inconclusive. One mechanism pertains to the motivational relevance of distraction tasks. In this study the motivation to engage ... [more ▼]

Research on the effectiveness of distraction as a method of pain control is inconclusive. One mechanism pertains to the motivational relevance of distraction tasks. In this study the motivation to engage in a distraction task during pain was experimentally manipulated. Undergraduate students (N=73) participated in a cold pressor test (CPT) and were randomly assigned to three groups: a distraction-only group performed a tone-detection task during the CPT, a motivated-distraction group performed the same task and received a monetary reward for good task performance, and a control group did not perform the tone-detection task. Results indicated that engagement in the distraction task was better in the motivated-distraction group in comparison with the distraction-only group. Participants in both distraction groups experienced less pain compared to the control group. There were no overall differences in pain intensity between the two distraction groups. The effect of distraction was influenced by the level of catastrophic thinking about pain. For low catastrophizers, both distraction groups reported less pain as compared to the non-distracted control group. This was not the case for high catastrophizers. For high catastrophizers it mattered whether the distraction task was motivationally relevant: high catastrophizers reported less intense pain in the motivated-distraction group, as compared to the non-distracted control group. We conclude that increasing the motivational relevance of the distraction task may increase the effects of distraction, especially for those who catastrophize about pain. [less ▲]

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See detailIncreased basal mechanical pain sensitivity but decreased perceptual wind-up in a human model of relative hypocortisolism
Kuehl, Linn; Michaux, Gilles; Richter, Steffen et al

in Pain (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (2 UL)
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See detailChronic stress and pain - a plea for a concerted research program
Anton, Fernand UL

in Pain (2009), 143(3), 163-164

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (0 UL)
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See detailPrdeicing the failure of disc surgery by a hypofunctional HPA axis: evidence from a prospective study of patients undergoing disc surgery
Geiss, Andrea; Rohleder, Nicolas; Kirschbaum, Clemens et al

in Pain (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (0 UL)
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See detailGabapentin reduces the mechanosensitivity of fine afferent nerve fibres in normal and inflamed rat knee joints.
Hanesch, Ulrike UL; Pawlak, Matthias; McDougall, Jason

in Pain (2003), 104

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (0 UL)
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See detailNoradrenergic and opioid systems interact to alter the detection of noxious thermal stimuli and facial scratching in monkeys
Thomas, David A; Anton, Fernand UL; Williams, GM et al

in Pain (1993), 55(1), 63-70

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (0 UL)
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See detailPsychophysical examination of pain induced by defined CO2 pulses applied to the nasal mucosa
Anton, Fernand UL; Euchner, Ingrid; Handwerker, Hermann-Otto

in Pain (1992), 49(1), 53-60

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (0 UL)
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See detailMeasurement of the nalgesic efects of aspirin with a new experimantal algesimetric procedure
Fortser, Clemens; Anton, Fernand UL; Reeh, Peter-Werner et al

in Pain (1988), 32(2), 215-222

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
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See detailThe effect of carrageenan-induced inflammation on the sensitivity of unmyelinated skin nociceptors in rat
Kocher, Laurence; Anton, Fernand UL; Reeh, Peter-Werner et al

in Pain (1987), 29(3), 363-373

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (0 UL)