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See detailSemaphorin 3A stimulates neurite extension and regulates gene expression in PC12 cells.
Schwamborn, Jens Christian UL; Fiore, Roberto; Bagnard, Dominique et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(30), 30923-6

The secreted semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a member of a large family of proteins that act as guidance signals for axons and dendrites. While the receptors and signaling pathways that mediate the repulsive ... [more ▼]

The secreted semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a member of a large family of proteins that act as guidance signals for axons and dendrites. While the receptors and signaling pathways that mediate the repulsive effects of semaphorins are beginning to be understood in some detail, the mechanisms that are responsible for the ability of Sema3A to stimulate the extension of dendrites remain to be elucidated. Here we show that PC12 cells, a model widely used to study neuronal differentiation, can be used to dissect this pathway. Sema3A is as effective as nerve growth factor in stimulating the extension of neurites from PC12 cells. We show that Sema3A is able to regulate gene expression and identify mitochondria as a novel target of Sema3A signaling. Pharmacological block of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production abolishes the extension of neurites in response to Sema3A. These results show that the characterization of transcripts that are regulated by axon guidance signals may help to identify novel components of their signaling pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailJanus kinase (Jak) subcellular localization revisited: the exclusive membrane localization of endogenous Janus kinase 1 by cytokine receptor interaction uncovers the Jak.receptor complex to be equivalent to a receptor tyrosine kinase
Behrmann, Iris UL; Smyczek, Tanja; Heinrich, Peter C. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(34), 35486-93

The Janus kinases are considered to be cytoplasmic kinases that constitutively associate with the cytoplasmic region of cytokine receptors, and the Janus kinases (Jaks) are crucial for cytokine signal ... [more ▼]

The Janus kinases are considered to be cytoplasmic kinases that constitutively associate with the cytoplasmic region of cytokine receptors, and the Janus kinases (Jaks) are crucial for cytokine signal transduction. We investigated Jak1 localization using subcellular fractionation techniques and fluorescence microscopy (immunofluorescence and yellow fluorescent protein-tagged Jaks). In the different experimental approaches we found Jak1 (as well as Jak2 and Tyk2) predominantly located at membranes. In contrast to previous reports we did not observe Jak proteins in significant amounts within the nucleus or in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic localization observed for the Jak1 mutant L80A/Y81A, which is unable to associate with cytokine receptors, indicates that Jak1 does not have a strong intrinsic membrane binding potential and that only receptor binding is crucial for the membrane recruitment. Finally we show that Jak1 remains a membrane-localized protein after cytokine stimulation. These data strongly support the hypothesis that cytokine receptor.Janus kinase complexes can be regarded as receptor tyrosine kinases. [less ▲]

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See detailRapid stimulation of free glucuronate formation by non-glucuronidable xenobiotics in isolated rat hepatocytes
Linster, Carole UL; Van Schaftingen, Emile

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(38), 36328-33

Vitamin C synthesis in rat liver is enhanced by several xenobiotics, including aminopyrine and chloretone. The effect of these agents has been linked to induction of enzymes potentially involved in the ... [more ▼]

Vitamin C synthesis in rat liver is enhanced by several xenobiotics, including aminopyrine and chloretone. The effect of these agents has been linked to induction of enzymes potentially involved in the formation of glucuronate, a precursor of vitamin C. Using isolated rat hepatocytes as a model, we show that a series of agents (aminopyrine, antipyrine, chloretone, clotrimazole, metyrapone, proadifen, and barbital) induced in a few minutes an up to 15-fold increase in the formation of glucuronate, which was best observed in the presence of sorbinil, an inhibitor of glucuronate reductase. They also caused an approximately 2-fold decrease in the concentration of UDP-glucuronate but little if any change in the concentration of UDP-glucose. Depletion of UDP-glucuronate with resorcinol or d-galactosamine markedly decreased the formation of glucuronate both in the presence and in the absence of aminopyrine, confirming the precursor-product relationship between UDP-glucuronate and free glucuronate. Most of the agents did not induce the formation of detectable amounts of glucuronides, indicating that the formation of glucuronate is not due to a glucuronidation-deglucuronidation cycle. With the exception of barbital (which inhibits glucuronate reductase), all of the above mentioned agents also caused an increase in the concentration of ascorbic acid. They had little effect on glutathione concentration, and their effect on glucuronate and vitamin C formation was not mimicked by glutathione-depleting agents such as diamide and buthionine sulfoximine. It is concluded that the stimulation of vitamin C synthesis exerted by some xenobiotics is mediated through a rapid increase in the conversion of UDP-glucuronate to glucuronate, which does not apparently involve a glucuronidation-deglucuronidation cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailA fusion protein of the gp130 and interleukin-6Ralpha ligand-binding domains acts as a potent interleukin-6 inhibitor.
Ancey, Cecile; Kuster, Andrea; Haan, Serge UL et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(19), 16968-72

Interleukin (IL)-6 is involved in the maintenance and progression of several diseases such as multiple myeloma, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoporosis. The present work aims at the development of an IL-6 ... [more ▼]

Interleukin (IL)-6 is involved in the maintenance and progression of several diseases such as multiple myeloma, rheumatoid arthritis, or osteoporosis. The present work aims at the development of an IL-6 inhibitor for the use in anti-cytokine therapies. The IL-6 receptor is composed of two different subunits, an alpha-subunit (IL-6Ralpha) that binds IL-6 with low affinity and a beta-subunit (gp130) that binds the IL-6.IL-6Ralpha complex with high affinity and as a result triggers intracellular signaling. In its soluble form, gp130 is a natural antagonist that neutralizes IL-6.soluble IL-6Ralpha complexes. It was our strategy to appropriately fuse the two receptor subunit fragments involved in IL-6 receptor complex formation to bind IL-6 with high affinity and to antagonize its effects. The ligand-binding domains of gp130 (D1-D2-D3) and IL-6Ralpha (D2-D3) were connected using three different linkers. The resulting constructs were expressed in stably transfected insect cells and tested for their ability to inhibit IL-6 activity in several in vitro systems. All fusion proteins were strong inhibitors of IL-6 signaling and abrogated IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, proliferation of transfected Ba/F3 cells, and induction of acute-phase protein synthesis. As intended, the fused receptors were much more effective than the separately expressed soluble receptor proteins. The fusion protein strategy presented here can also be applied to other cytokines that signal via receptors composed of two different subunits to design new potent inhibitors for anti-cytokine therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailTyrosine phosphorylation disrupts elongin interaction and accelerates SOCS3 degradation.
Haan, Serge UL; Ferguson, Paul; Sommer, Ulrike et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(34), 31972-9

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine and growth factor-induced signal transduction. The C-terminal SOCS box region is thought to regulate SOCS protein ... [more ▼]

The suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) are negative feedback inhibitors of cytokine and growth factor-induced signal transduction. The C-terminal SOCS box region is thought to regulate SOCS protein stability most likely via an elongin C interaction. In the present study, we have found that phosphorylation of SOCS3 at two tyrosine residues in the conserved SOCS box, Tyr204 and Tyr221, can inhibit the SOCS3-elongin C interaction and activate proteasome-mediated SOCS3 degradation. Jak-mediated phosphorylation of SOCS3 decreased SOCS3 protein half-life, and phosphorylation of both Tyr204 and Tyr221 was required to fully destabilize SOCS3. In contrast, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of SOCS3, Y204F,Y221F, remained stable in the presence of activated Jak2 and receptor tyrosine kinases. SOCS3 stability correlated with the relative amount that bound elongin C, because in vitro phosphorylation of a SOCS3-glutathione S-transferase fusion protein abolished its ability to interact with elongin C. In addition, a SOCS3/SOCS1 chimera that co-precipitates with markedly increased elongin C, was significantly more stable than wild-type SOCS3. The data suggest that interaction with elongin C stabilizes SOCS3 protein expression and that phosphorylation of SOCS box tyrosine residues disrupts the complex and enhances proteasome-mediated degradation of SOCS3. [less ▲]

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See detailAkt modulates STAT3-mediated gene expression through a FKHR (FOXO1a)-dependent mechanism
Kortylewski, M.; Feld, F.; Krüger, K. D. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(7), 5242-9

The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway plays an important role in the signaling of insulin and other growth factors, which reportedly attenuate the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-mediated stimulation of ... [more ▼]

The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway plays an important role in the signaling of insulin and other growth factors, which reportedly attenuate the interleukin-6 (IL-6)-mediated stimulation of acute phase plasma protein genes. We investigated the effect of the protein kinase Akt on IL-6-mediated transcriptional activation. The transient expression of constitutively active Akt inhibited the IL-6-dependent activity of the alpha(2)-macroglobulin promoter in HepG2 cells, whereas expression of an inactive mutant of phosphatidylinositol-dependent kinase 1 had the opposite effect. Since Akt is known to regulate gene expression through inactivation of the transcription factor FKHR (forkhead in rhabdomyosarcoma), we examined the effect of FKHR on STAT3-mediated transcriptional regulation. Indeed, the overexpression of FKHR specifically enhanced the activity of STAT3-dependent promoters but not that of a STAT5-responsive promoter. The effect of FKHR required the presence of functional STAT3 and was abrogated by the expression of dominant negative STAT3 mutants. Furthermore, FKHR and STAT3 were shown to coimmunoprecipitate and to colocalize in the nuclear regions of IL-6-treated HepG2 cells. Our results indicate that FKHR can modulate the IL-6-induced transcriptional activity by acting as a coactivator of STAT3. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term association of the cytokine receptor gp130 and the Janus kinase Jak1 revealed by FRAP analysis
Giese, B.; Au-Yeung, C. K.; Herrmann, A. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2003), 278(40), 39205-13

Signal transduction through cytokine receptors is mediated mainly by non-covalently associated Jak tyrosine kinases. By confocal microscopy, the cytokine receptor gp130 and Jak1, fused with either yellow ... [more ▼]

Signal transduction through cytokine receptors is mediated mainly by non-covalently associated Jak tyrosine kinases. By confocal microscopy, the cytokine receptor gp130 and Jak1, fused with either yellow (YFP) or cyan (CFP) fluorescent protein, were found to be colocalized predominantly at intracellular vesicular structures and at the plasma membrane. Quantitative fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis at the plasma membrane revealed equal mobilities for gp130-YFP and Jak1-YFP. Thus, Jak1-YFP diffuses like a transmembrane protein indicating that membrane-bound Jak1 does not exchange rapidly with cytosolic Jaks. Applying a novel dual-color FRAP approach we found that immobilization of gp130-CFP by a pair of monoclonal antibodies led to a corresponding immobilization of co-transfected Jak1-YFP. We conclude from these findings that Jak1, once bound to a gp130 molecule, does not exchange between different receptors at the plasma membrane neither via the cytoplasmic compartment nor via a membrane-associated state. [less ▲]

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See detailSHP2 and SOCS3 contribute to Tyr-759-dependent attenuation of interleukin-6 signaling through gp130
Lehmann, U.; Schmitz, J.; Weissenbach, M. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 278(1), 661-71

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) activates the Jak/STAT pathway as well as the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. Tyrosine 759 of the IL-6 signal-transducing receptor subunit gp130 has been identified as being ... [more ▼]

Interleukin-6 (IL-6) activates the Jak/STAT pathway as well as the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade. Tyrosine 759 of the IL-6 signal-transducing receptor subunit gp130 has been identified as being involved in negative regulation of IL-6-induced gene induction and activation of the Jak/STAT pathway. Because this site is known to be a recruitment motif for the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP2, it has been suggested that SHP2 is the mediator of tyrosine 759-dependent signal attenuation. We recently observed that the suppressor of cytokine-signaling SOCS3 also acts through the tyrosine motif 759 of gp130. However, the relative contributions of SHP2 and SOCS3 to the repression of IL-6 signaling are not understood. Therefore, we designed experiments allowing the independent recruitment of each of these proteins to the IL-6-receptor complex. We show that receptor- and membrane-targeted SHP2 counteracts IL-6 signaling independent of SOCS3 binding to gp130. On the other hand, SOCS3 inhibits signaling in cells expressing a truncated SHP2 protein, which is not recruited to gp130. These data suggest, that there are two, largely distinct modes of negative regulation of gp130 activity, despite the fact that both SOCS3 and SHP2 are recruited to the same site within gp130. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel role of Janus kinase 1 in the regulation of oncostatin M receptor surface expression
Radtke, S.; Hermanns, H. M.; Haan, Claude UL et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(13), 11297-305

The oncostatin M receptor (OSMR) is part of a heterodimeric receptor complex that mediates signal transduction of the pleiotropic cytokine OSM via a signaling pathway involving Janus kinases (Jaks) and ... [more ▼]

The oncostatin M receptor (OSMR) is part of a heterodimeric receptor complex that mediates signal transduction of the pleiotropic cytokine OSM via a signaling pathway involving Janus kinases (Jaks) and transcription factors of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family. Upon heterologous expression of the OSMR in several cell lines, we observed that its surface expression was significantly enhanced by coexpression of the Janus kinases Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 but not Jak3. Chimeric receptors consisting of the extracellular region of the interleukin-5 receptor beta chain and the transmembrane and intracellular part of the OSMR were similarly up-regulated on the plasma membrane when Jak1 was coexpressed. The overall expression level of these constructs did not change significantly, but Jak1 coexpression increased the amount of endoglycosidase H-resistant, fully processed OSMR chimeras. Using mutated receptor and Jak1 constructs, we were able to demonstrate that association of Jak1 with the membrane proximal region of the receptor, but not its kinase activity, is necessary for this effect. Moreover, deletion of the OSMR box1/2 region also resulted in an improved surface expression indicating that this region may contain a signal preventing efficient receptor surface expression in the absence of associated Jaks. Finally we demonstrate that in Jak1-deficient cells, the endogenous OSMR is significantly down-regulated, an effect that can be reversed by transient expression of Jak1 in these cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThe matrix metalloproteinase 9 (mmp-9) hemopexin domain is a novel gelatin binding domain and acts as an antagonist
Roeb, E.; Schleinkofer, K.; Kernebeck, T. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(52), 50326-32

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the remodeling processes of the extracellular matrix and the basement membrane. Most MMPs are composed of a regulatory, a catalytic, and a hemopexin ... [more ▼]

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in the remodeling processes of the extracellular matrix and the basement membrane. Most MMPs are composed of a regulatory, a catalytic, and a hemopexin subunit. In many tumors the expression of MMP-9 correlates with local tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. To analyze the role of the hemopexin domain in these processes, the MMP-9 hemopexin domain (MMP-9-PEX) was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. After proteolytic cleavage, the isolated PEX domain was purified by size exclusion chromatography. In a zymography assay, MMP-9-PEX was able to inhibit MMP-9 activity. The association and dissociation rates for the interaction of MMP-9-PEX with gelatin were determined by plasmon resonance. From the measured rate constants, the dissociation constant was calculated to be K(d) = 2,4 x 10(-8) m, demonstrating a high affinity between MMP-9-PEX and gelatin. In Boyden chamber experiments the recombinant MMP-9-PEX was able to inhibit the invasion of melanoma cells secreting high amounts of MMP-9 in a dose-dependent manner. These data demonstrate for the first time that the hemopexin domain of MMP-9 has a high affinity binding site for gelatin, and the particular recombinant domain is able to block MMP-9 activity and tumor cell invasion. Because MMP-9 plays an important role in metastasis, this antagonistic effect may be utilized to design MMP inhibition-based cancer therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailOrientational constraints of the gp130 intracellular juxtamembrane domain for signaling
Greiser, J. S.; Stross, C.; Heinrich, P. C. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2002), 277(30), 26959-65

The glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the common signal transducing receptor chain of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. Here we investigated the requirements for transfer of the information given by ligand ... [more ▼]

The glycoprotein 130 (gp130) is the common signal transducing receptor chain of the interleukin-6 family of cytokines. Here we investigated the requirements for transfer of the information given by ligand binding to the cytoplasmic domain of gp130. It is demonstrated that the box 1/2 region has to be located membrane-proximally in order to bind and activate Janus kinases. To test the possible requirement of an alpha-helical orientation, we inserted 1-4 alanine residues into this juxtamembrane intracellular region. The insertion of one alanine results in a strongly reduced activation of STAT1 and STAT3, whereas insertion of three alanine residues leads to a stronger STAT activation. These results suggest that gp130-mediated activation of STATs is sensitive to rotational changes around the receptor axis perpendicular to the membrane. Surprisingly, insertion of 1, 2, 3, or 4 alanine residues into this juxtamembrane region leads to successive impairment but not abolishment of Janus kinase and receptor phosphorylation, supporting the finding of sensitivity of Janus kinases toward changes in distance of box 1/2 from the plasma membrane. We suggest a new model concerning the gp130 activation mode in which the relative orientation of the cytoplasmic regions seems to be critical for further signal transduction. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping of a region within the N terminus of Jak1 involved in cytokine receptor interaction
Haan, Claude UL; Isharc, H.; Hermanns, H. M. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001), 276(40), 37451-8

Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that noncovalently associates with a variety of cytokine receptors. Here we show that the in vitro translated N-terminal domains of Jak1 are ... [more ▼]

Janus kinase 1 (Jak1) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that noncovalently associates with a variety of cytokine receptors. Here we show that the in vitro translated N-terminal domains of Jak1 are sufficient for binding to a biotinylated peptide comprising the membrane-proximal 73 amino acids of gp130, the signal-transducing receptor chain of interleukin-6-type cytokines. By the fold recognition approach amino acid residues 36-112 of Jak1 were predicted to adopt a beta-grasp fold, and a structural model was built using ubiquitin as a template. Substitution of Tyr(107) to alanine, a residue conserved among Jaks and involved in hydrophobic core interactions of the proposed beta-grasp domain, abrogated binding of full-length Jak1 to gp130 in COS-7 transfectants. By further mutagenesis we identified the loop 4 region of the Jak1 beta-grasp domain as essential for gp130 association and gp130-mediated signal transduction. In Jak1-deficient U4C cells reconstituted with the loop 4 Jak1 mutants L80A/Y81A and Delta(Tyr(81)-Ser(84)), the interferon-gamma, interferon-alpha, and interleukin-6 responses were similarly impaired. Thus, loop 4 of the beta-grasp domain plays a role in the association of Jak1 with both class I and II cytokine receptors. Taken together the structural model and the mutagenesis data provide further insight into the interaction of Janus kinases with cytokine receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-redundant signal transduction of interleukin-6-type cytokines. The adapter protein Shc is specifically recruited to rhe oncostatin M receptor
Hermanns, H. M.; Radtke, S.; Schaper, F. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2001), 275(52), 40742-8

The common use of the cytokine receptor gp130 has served as an explanation for the extremely redundant biological activities exerted by interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokines. Indeed, hardly any differences in ... [more ▼]

The common use of the cytokine receptor gp130 has served as an explanation for the extremely redundant biological activities exerted by interleukin (IL)-6-type cytokines. Indeed, hardly any differences in signal transduction initiated by these cytokines are known. In the present study, we demonstrate that oncostatin M (OSM), but not IL-6 or leukemia inhibitory factor, induces tyrosine phosphorylation of the Shc isoforms p52 and p66 and their association with Grb2. Concomitantly, OSM turns out to be a stronger activator of ERK1/2 MAPKs. Shc is recruited to the OSM receptor (OSMR), but not to gp130. Binding involves Tyr(861) of the OSMR, located within a consensus binding sequence for the Shc PTB domain. Moreover, Tyr(861) is essential for activation of ERK1/2 and for full activation of the alpha(2)-macroglobulin promoter, but not for an exclusively STAT-responsive promoter. This study therefore provides evidence for qualitative differential signaling mechanisms exerted by IL-6-type cytokines. [less ▲]

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See detailSOCS3 exerts its inhibitory function on interleukin-6 signal transduction through the SHP2 recruitment site of gp130.
Schmitz, J.; Weissenbach, M.; Haan, Serge UL et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2000), 275(17), 12848-56

Interleukin-6 is involved in the regulation of many biological activities such as gene expression, cell proliferation, and differentiation. The control of the termination of cytokine signaling is as ... [more ▼]

Interleukin-6 is involved in the regulation of many biological activities such as gene expression, cell proliferation, and differentiation. The control of the termination of cytokine signaling is as important as the regulation of initiation of signal transduction pathways. Three families of proteins involved in the down-regulation of cytokine signaling have been described recently: (i) SH2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHP), (ii) suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and (iii) protein inhibitors of activated STATs (PIAS). We have analyzed the interplay of two inhibitors in the signal transduction pathway of interleukin-6 and demonstrate that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and SOCS3 do not act independently but are functionally linked. The activation of one inhibitor modulates the activity of the other; Inhibition of SHP2 activation leads to increased SOCS3-mRNA levels, whereas increased expression of SOCS3 results in a reduction of SHP2 phosphorylation after activation of the interleukin-6 signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, we show that tyrosine 759 in gp130 is essential for both SHP2 and SOCS3 but not for SOCS1 to exert their inhibitory activities on interleukin-6 signal transduction. Besides SHP2, SOCS3 also interacts with the Tyr(P)-759 peptide of gp130. Taken together, our results suggest differences in the function of SOCS1 and SOCS3 and a link between SHP2 and SOCS3. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization and binding specificity of the monomeric STAT3-SH2 domain.
Haan, Serge UL; Hemmann, U.; Hassiepen, U. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1999), 274(3), 1342-8

Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are important mediators of cytokine signal transduction. STAT factors are recruited to phosphotyrosine-containing motifs of activated receptor ... [more ▼]

Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) are important mediators of cytokine signal transduction. STAT factors are recruited to phosphotyrosine-containing motifs of activated receptor chains via their SH2 domains. The subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of the STATs leads to their dissociation from the receptor, dimerization, and translocation to the nucleus. Here we describe the expression, purification, and refolding of the STAT3-SH2 domain. Proper folding of the isolated protein was proven by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. The STAT3-SH2 domain undergoes a conformational change upon dimerization. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we demonstrate that the monomeric domain binds to specific phosphotyrosine peptides. The specificity of binding to phosphotyrosine peptides was assayed with the tyrosine motif encompassing Tyr705 of STAT3 and with all tyrosine motifs present in the cytoplasmic tail of the signal transducer gp130. [less ▲]

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See detailA single STAT recruitment module in a chimeric cytokine receptor complex is sufficient for STAT activation
Behrmann, Iris UL; Janzen, C.; Gerhartz, C. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1997), 272(8), 5269-74

We established a system of receptor chimeras that enabled us to induce heterodimerization of different cytoplasmic tails. Fusion constructs were created that are composed of the extracellular parts of the ... [more ▼]

We established a system of receptor chimeras that enabled us to induce heterodimerization of different cytoplasmic tails. Fusion constructs were created that are composed of the extracellular parts of the interleukin-5 receptor alpha and beta chains, respectively, and the transmembrane and intracellular parts of gp130, the signal transducing chain of the interleukin-6 receptor complex. In COS-7 transfectants we observed a dose-dependent interleukin-5-inducible STAT1 activation for which the presence of both the alpha and the beta chain chimera was needed. No STAT activity was detected if one of the cytoplasmic tails of the receptor complex was deleted, indicating that STAT activity resulted from a receptor dimer rather than from higher receptor aggregates. We further investigated whether dimerization of STAT1 depends on the juxtaposition of two STAT recruitment modules in a receptor complex. We show that a receptor dimer with only a single STAT1 docking site was still able to lead to STAT1 activation. This indicates that the formation of a paired set of STAT binding sites in a receptor complex is not the prerequisite for STAT factor dimerization. Our findings are discussed in view of alternative STAT dimerization models. [less ▲]

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See detailPurification and molecular cloning of the APO-1 cell surface antigen, a member of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily. Sequence identity with the Fas antigen
Oehm, A.; Behrmann, Iris UL; Falk, W. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (1992), 267(15), 10709-15

The APO-1 antigen as defined by the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-APO-1 was previously found to be expressed on the cell surface of activated human T and B lymphocytes and a variety of malignant human ... [more ▼]

The APO-1 antigen as defined by the mouse monoclonal antibody anti-APO-1 was previously found to be expressed on the cell surface of activated human T and B lymphocytes and a variety of malignant human lymphoid cell lines. Cross-linking of the APO-1 antigen by anti-APO-1 induced programmed cell death, apoptosis, of APO-1 positive cells. To characterize the APO-1 cell surface molecule and to better understand its role in induction of apoptosis, the APO-1 protein was purified to homogeneity from membranes of SKW6.4 B lymphoblastoid cells by solubilization with sodium deoxycholate, affinity chromatography with anti-APO-1 antibody, and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Each purification step was followed by an APO-1-specific solid phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using the monoclonal antibody anti-APO-1. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the APO-1 antigen was found to be a membrane glycoprotein of 48-kDa. Endoproteinase-cleaved peptides of the APO-1 protein were subjected to amino acid sequencing, and corresponding oligonucleotides were used to identify a full-length APO-1 cDNA clone from an SKW6.4 cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence of APO-1 showed sequence identity with the Fas antigen, a cysteine-rich transmembrane protein of 335 amino acids with significant similarity to the members of the tumor necrosis factor/nerve growth factor receptor superfamily. The APO-1 antigen was expressed upon transfection of APO-1 cDNA into BL60-P7 Burkitt's lymphoma cells and conferred sensitivity towards anti-APO-1-induced apoptosis to the transfectants. [less ▲]

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