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See detailOnline sexual activities: An exploratory study of problematic and non-problematic usage patterns in a sample of men
Wéry, A.; Billieux, Joël UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 56

Involvement in online sexual activities (OSAs) is ubiquitous, especially in males, and can under certain circumstances become problematic. The risk factors associated with problematic OSAs remain, however ... [more ▼]

Involvement in online sexual activities (OSAs) is ubiquitous, especially in males, and can under certain circumstances become problematic. The risk factors associated with problematic OSAs remain, however, poorly explored. The current study aimed to investigate the characteristics, usage patterns, and motives for men to engage in OSAs and to disentangle the risk factors associated with problematic OSAs. To this end, 434 men completed an online survey measuring socio-demographic information, OSAs consumption habits, motives for engaging in OSAs, symptoms of problematic OSAs, and sexual dysfunctions. Results showed that watching pornography is the most prevalent OSA, and sexual gratification is the most frequent motive for OSAs involvement. Additional multiple regression analyses indicated that the following characteristics are associated with problematic use of OSAs: (a) partnered-arousal activities (e.g., sex chat) and solitary-arousal activities (e.g., pornography); (b) anonymous fantasizing and mood regulation motives; and (c) higher sexual desire, lower overall sexual satisfaction, and lower erectile function. This study sheds new light on the characteristics, motives, and sexual function of men involved in OSAs, emphasizing that problematic OSAs are heterogeneous and depend on interrelated factors. The findings support tailoring of preventive actions and clinical interventions to both OSA type and individual risk factors. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEasily too difficult. Estimating item difficulty in computer simulated microworlds
Stadler, Matthias; Niepel, Christoph UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 65

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See detailUnderstanding students' performance in a computer-based assessment of complex problem solving. An analysis of behavioral data from computer-generated log files.
Greiff, Samuel UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Scherer, Ronny et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2016), 61

Computer-based assessments of complex problem solving (CPS) that have been used in international large-scale surveys require students to engage in an in-depth interaction with the problem environment. In ... [more ▼]

Computer-based assessments of complex problem solving (CPS) that have been used in international large-scale surveys require students to engage in an in-depth interaction with the problem environment. In this, they evoke manifest sequences of overt behavior that are stored in computer-generated logfiles. In the present study, we explored the relation between several overt behaviors, which N=1476 Finnish ninth-grade students (mean age=15.23,SD=.47 years) exhibited when exploring a CPS environment, and their CPS performance. We used the MicroDYN approach to measure CPS and inspected students' behaviors through log-file analyses. Results indicated that students who occasionally observed the problem environment in a noninterfering way in addition to actively exploring it (noninterfering observation) showed better CPS performance, whereas students who showed a high frequency of (potentially unplanned) interventions (intervention frequency) exhibited worse CPS performance. Additionally, both too much and too little time spent on a CPS task (time on task) was associated with poor CPS performance. The observed effects held after controlling for students' use of an exploration strategy that required a sequence of multiple interventions (VOTAT strategy) indicating that these behaviors exhibited incremental effects on CPS performance beyond the use of VOTAT. [less ▲]

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See detailUser Experience: a concept without consensus? Exploring practitioners' perspectives through an international survey.
Lallemand, Carine UL; Gronier, Guillaume; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2015), (43), 35-48

For more than a decade, User Experience (UX) has grown into a core concept of Human–Computer Inter- action (HCI). Practitioners and researchers from a wide range of disciplines are daily working with this ... [more ▼]

For more than a decade, User Experience (UX) has grown into a core concept of Human–Computer Inter- action (HCI). Practitioners and researchers from a wide range of disciplines are daily working with this concept. However, despite many attempts to understand, define and scope UX, one may still wonder whether a consensus has been reached on this concept. In a willingness to address the complexity of this research topic and bring the concept of UX to maturity, a replication of an international survey has been conducted. The main goal of the present study is to get a better understanding of practitioners’ view- points on the notion of UX and to analyze potential evolutions over time in the understanding and prac- tical use of the concept. As both practical and theoretical implications of UX are of the greatest importance for whoever designs interactive systems, the exploration of practitioners’ perspectives is a valuable step toward continual improvement of UX activities. The present survey has been conducted amongst 758 practitioners and researchers from 35 nationalities. It allows to better understand how this concept is understood and used throughout the world. Amongst interesting results, important differences were observed according to the geographical location and background of the respondents. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic involvement in online games: A cluster analytic approach
Billieux, Joël UL; Thorens, G.; Khazaal, Y. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2015), 43

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior ... [more ▼]

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior, including impulsivity traits, motives to play (immersion, achievement, social affiliation), and self-esteem. The aim of the current study is to determine whether reliable subtypes of problematic online gamers can be identified. A sample of 1057 online gamers was recruited. Validated questionnaires were used to measure established psychological risk factors (impulsivity, motives to play, self-esteem) and potential consequences of playing (addiction symptoms, positive and negative affect). Actual in-game behaviors were also monitored. Five reliable clusters of gamers were identified (three problematic and two nonproblematic clusters). Cluster comparison revealed that the psychological factors considered are differentially involved in problematic online gaming. At the theoretical level, the results emphasized that problem online gaming depends on a wide range of psychological factors. At the clinical level, the diversity of psychological profiles shown supports the development of personalized (custom-made) interventions targeting specific psychological mechanisms. Overall, our findings suggest that conceptualizing the problematic use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games as "behavioral addiction" is too restrictive and might result in the simplification of heterogeneous and multi-determined problematic behaviors. © 2014, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailWhich psychological factors influence Internet addiction? Evidence through an integrative model
Burnay, J.; Billieux, Joël UL; Blairy, S. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2015), 43

Since the appearance of Internet, several preoccupations have appeared as a result, with Internet addiction being one of the most common. The goals of the present study were twofold. First, to examine ... [more ▼]

Since the appearance of Internet, several preoccupations have appeared as a result, with Internet addiction being one of the most common. The goals of the present study were twofold. First, to examine which psychological factors are relevant to explain Internet addiction, including impulsivity, passion and social provision. Second, to incorporate all these factors into an integrative model. Based on multiple regressions and path analysis, results revealed a positive relation between Internet addiction and specific impulsivity components (lack of perseverance, urgency) and obsessive passion. Moreover, positive relations were observed between obsessive passion and reassurance of worth, opportunity for nurturance, sensation seeking and harmonious passion. In other words, Internet addiction is related to obsessive passion, but is explained by different psychological factors. Accordingly, both Internet addiction and obsessive passion can be viewed as two important and complementary facets of problematic Internet use. ©2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailWhy do you play World of Warcraft? An in-depth exploration of self-reported motivations to play online and in-game behaviours in the virtual world of Azeroth
Billieux, Joël UL; Van Der Linden, M.; Achab, S. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2013), 29(1), 103-109

Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are video games in which players create an avatar that evolves and interacts with other avatars in a persistent virtual world. Motivations to play ... [more ▼]

Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are video games in which players create an avatar that evolves and interacts with other avatars in a persistent virtual world. Motivations to play MMORPGs are heterogeneous (e.g. achievement, socialisation, immersion in virtual worlds). This study investigates in detail the relationships between self-reported motives and actual in-game behaviours. We recruited a sample of 690 World of Warcraft players (the most popular MMORPG) who agreed to have their avatar monitored for 8 months. Participants completed an initial online survey about their motives to play. Their actual in-game behaviours were measured through the game's official database (the Armory website). Results showed specific associations between motives and in-game behaviours. Moreover, longitudinal analyses revealed that teamwork- and competition-oriented motives are the most accurate predictors of fast progression in the game. In addition, although specific associations exist between problematic use and certain motives (e.g. advancement, escapism), longitudinal analyses showed that high involvement in the game is not necessarily associated with a negative impact upon daily living. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEscaping in digital games: The relationship between playing motives and addictive tendencies in males
Kneer, Julia; Glock, Sabine UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2013), 29

Problematic playing behaviour in terms of addiction is well known to be associated with specific traits (e.g., self-esteem) and weak social settings (e.g., negative relationships). What remains unclear is ... [more ▼]

Problematic playing behaviour in terms of addiction is well known to be associated with specific traits (e.g., self-esteem) and weak social settings (e.g., negative relationships). What remains unclear is the impact of playing motives on addictive tendencies. We investigated how playing motives were related to problematic playing behaviour. Using ratings indicating explicit motives and response latencies indicating the activation of implicit motives, we investigated Yee’s (2006) three main playing motives: social interaction, achievement, and immersion. All three implicit motives were found to be highly activated among problematic players while only explicit immersion was judged as less important by non-problematic and excessive players. In addition, implicit immersion together with explicit immersion and playing hours were found to be strong predictors for problematic playing behaviour. We discuss motives, especially immersion, as possible risk factors for addictive tendencies when motives become internalised and therefore automatically activated by thoughts about digital games. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 160 (7 UL)