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See detailGetting the Hours You Want in the Preretirement Years: Work Hour Preferences and Mismatch Among Older Canadian Workers
Silver, Michelle; Settels, Jason UL; Schafer, Markus et al

in Work, Aging and Retirement (2018)

Expectations regarding the work hours of older workers have changed over time. This article examines Canadian workers in their pre-retirement years to identify patterns in work hour preferences by ... [more ▼]

Expectations regarding the work hours of older workers have changed over time. This article examines Canadian workers in their pre-retirement years to identify patterns in work hour preferences by gender—and whether work hour mismatch predicts late-stage workforce transitions. Findings from a national sample of Canadian workers show that slightly over half of all respondents were content with the number of hours they worked, but that 36% of the sample expressed a preference to work fewer hours and more than 8% expressed a preference to work more hours. Among men and women there were remarkable similarities in the factors that predicted a mismatch between respondents’ preferred and actual hours worked. While highlighting heterogeneity in the work hour preferences of Canadian workers in the years leading up to traditional retirement age, findings illustrate how mismatches between workers’ preferred and actual work hours predict later career workforce transitions. Findings also emphasize the importance of good relations with coworkers and supervisor support as factors that can enhance preferences to continue working at later career stages. Our findings also support claims that employers ought to be encouraged to focus on later career transitions and to find opportunities to enhance the fit between the number of hours required to meet work demands with individuals’ capabilities and interests. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkforce Transitions and Social Connectedness Among Older Adults in the United States
Settels, Jason UL; Schafer, Markus

in Work, Aging and Retirement (2018)

As the industrialized world faces a rapidly aging population, it has become increasingly important to understand the factors that influence the well-being of older persons. In this regard, many scholars ... [more ▼]

As the industrialized world faces a rapidly aging population, it has become increasingly important to understand the factors that influence the well-being of older persons. In this regard, many scholars have emphasized the importance of social connectedness. Various theories seek to explain social connectedness in later life, particularly as it applies to workforce involvement. Among those theories, we engage the theories of activity-substitution and of complementarity, and we seek to discover which provides a better account of the social and work lives of older Americans. We do so through an analysis of the first 2 waves (Wave 1: 2005–2006, Wave 2: 2010–2011) of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). Workforce transitions over time are assessed for their impact on 3 social connectedness outcomes: expansiveness of close networks, overall friendship network, and social participation. Results provide strong support for the theory of activity-substitution. Furthermore, our results show that those re-entering paid work after some time out of the workforce show the largest changes in social connectedness. The present study reinforces the importance of studying social connectedness as a multidimensional concept and draws attention to the increasing variability in workforce participation patterns among older persons. [less ▲]

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