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See detailDTKI: A New Formalized PKI with Verifiable Trusted Parties
Yu, Jiangshan UL; Cheval, Vincent; Ryan, Mark

in The Computer Journal (2016), 59(11), 1695--1713

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See detailFrom Ephemerizer to Timed-Ephemerizer - Achieve Assured Lifecycle Enforcement for Sensitive Data
Tang, Qiang UL

in The Computer Journal (2014)

The concept of Ephemerizer, proposed by Perlman, is a cryptographic primitive for assured data deletion. With an Ephemerizer protocol, data in persistent storage devices will always be encrypted ... [more ▼]

The concept of Ephemerizer, proposed by Perlman, is a cryptographic primitive for assured data deletion. With an Ephemerizer protocol, data in persistent storage devices will always be encrypted simultaneously using an ephemeral public key of the Ephemerizer (an entity that will publish a set of ephemeral public keys and periodically delete the expired ones) and the long-term public key of a user. An Ephemerizer protocol enables the user to securely decrypt the encrypted data without leaking any information to the Ephemerizer. So far, no security model has ever been proposed for this primitive and existing protocols have not been studied formally. Not surprisingly, we show that some existing Ephemerizer protocols possess security vulnerabilities. In this paper, we review the notion of Timed-Ephemerizer, which can be regarded as a hybrid primitive by combining Ephemerizer and timed-release encryption. Compared with an Ephemerizer protocol, a Timed-Ephemerizer protocol further guarantees that data will only be released after a pre-defined disclosure time. Moreover, we revisit a security model for Timed-Ephemerizer and adapt it for Ephemerizer. We also revise a previous Timed-Ephemerizer protocol by Tang and prove its security in the security model. [less ▲]

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See detailConvivial ambient technologies: Requirements, ontology, and design
Caire, Patrice UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

in The Computer Journal (2010), 53(8), 12291256

In this paper we discuss the use of the social concept ‘conviviality’ for computer science in general, and for the development of ambient technologies in particular. First, we give a survey of the use of ... [more ▼]

In this paper we discuss the use of the social concept ‘conviviality’ for computer science in general, and for the development of ambient technologies in particular. First, we give a survey of the use of the concept ‘conviviality’ in the social sciences. Conviviality is usually considered a positive concept related to sociability. However, further analysis reveals a negative side related to lack of diversity, privacy and ethical issues. Second, we argue that conviviality requirements for ambient intelligence are challenging, because ambient technologies give rise to a new virtual and social reality, and conviviality issues play a central role in applications that are concerned with the interaction of material, virtual and social realities. Conviviality highlights an important challenge that we illustrate with examples that emphasize ethical issues, such as privacy threats, surveillance of users and identity theft. Intelligent interfaces, for example, allow instant interactions and thereby create strong needs for coordination and regulation mechanisms that have to be addressed to ensure the safeguard of individuals against abuses, such as privacy intrusions and identity manipulations. Third, we propose a conviviality ontology by operationalizing the fuzzy concept of ‘conviviality,’ such that it can be used in computer science in the same way as other social concepts such as ‘service,’ ‘contract’ or ‘trust’ are used in this area. Conviviality is defined using dependence networks, and tools for conviviality are based on, what we call, conviviality masks. Fourth, we illustrate how convivial ambient intelligence applications can be designed using our operationalized concept of conviviality. We illustrate our arguments and contributions with a running example on the use of ambient technologies in digital cities, as a prototypical example where material reality such as ambient technologies interacts with virtual and social realities. [less ▲]

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