References of "Regional Science and Urban Economics"
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See detailSpatial segregation and urban structure
Picard, Pierre M UL

in Regional Science and Urban Economics (2020), 59(3), 480-507

In this paper, we develop a model of spatial segregation mediated by competitive land prices. Agents of two groups consume city land and benefit from social interactions. Because of cultural or ethnic ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we develop a model of spatial segregation mediated by competitive land prices. Agents of two groups consume city land and benefit from social interactions. Because of cultural or ethnic differences, intragroup interactions are more frequent than intergroup ones. When group sizes differ, population groups sort into distinct neighborhoods. We characterize two‐ and three‐district urban structures. For high population ratios or strong intergroup interactions, only a three‐district city exists. In other cases, multiplicity of equilibria arises. Both groups generally rank these equilibria differently. However, when group sizes are similar, all individuals agree on which spatial equilibrium is best. [less ▲]

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See detailEquilibrium and first-best city with endogenous exposure to local air pollution from traffic
Schindler, Mirjam UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Picard, Pierre M UL

in Regional Science and Urban Economics (2017), 62

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and ... [more ▼]

Exposure to urban traffic-induced air pollution is a major health concern of cities. This paper analyzes the urban structure when localized pollution exposure arises from commuting traffic and investigates the feedback effect of endogenous pollution on residential choices. The presence of stronger traffic-induced air pollution exposure reduces the geographical extent and the population of cities. Land rents fall with distance from the city center while population densities may be non-monotonic. Cleaner vehicle technologies reduce pollution exposure everywhere, increase population and density everywhere and do not affect the spatial extent of the city. The paper compares the urban equilibrium with the first-best. The first-best structure is a less expanded city with higher densities at the center and lower densities at the fringe. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Policy, First Nature Advantage and the Emergence of Economic Clusters
Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia UL; Xepapadeas, Anastasios

in Regional Science and Urban Economics (2013), 19(3),

We explain the spatial concentration of economic activity when the cost of environmental policy – which is increasing in the concentration of pollution – acts as a centrifugal force, while positive ... [more ▼]

We explain the spatial concentration of economic activity when the cost of environmental policy – which is increasing in the concentration of pollution – acts as a centrifugal force, while positive knowledge spillovers and a site with natural cost advantage act as centripetal forces. We study the agglomeration effects caused by trade-offs between centripetal and centrifugal forces which eventually determine the distribution of economic activity across space. The equilibrium solution with spatially myopic environmental policy results either in a monocentric or in a polycentric city with the major cluster at the natural advantage site. The regulator's optimum results in a bicentric city, which suggests that when environmental policy is spatially optimal, the natural advantage sites do not act as attractors of economic activity. In general, our results suggest that sites with inherent advantages can lose their comparative advantage when social costs at these spatial points are taken into account. [less ▲]

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