References of "Reading Medieval Studies"
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See detailConpains, vois tu ce que je voi?: gendered encounters in the Three Living and Three Dead
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Reading Medieval Studies (2018), 44

The encounter of the three living and three dead is one of the most famous traditions in medieval European art as well as in French and English literature. This article explores a rare image of an ... [more ▼]

The encounter of the three living and three dead is one of the most famous traditions in medieval European art as well as in French and English literature. This article explores a rare image of an encounter between three women and three dead (in manuscript Paris, BNF fr. 378), which illustrates a French poem about masculine protagonists, in order to develop further the debates concerning this meditative tradition and the role of images in the macabre. [less ▲]

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See detailReading Abbey's Anglo-Norman French translation of the Bible (London, British Library Royal MS 1 C III)
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Reading Medieval Studies (2016), 42

Part of a special issue dedicated to the manuscripts of Reading Abbey. This article examines a translation into Anglo-Norman French prose of part of the Bible (Genesis - Tobit). It reviews the existing ... [more ▼]

Part of a special issue dedicated to the manuscripts of Reading Abbey. This article examines a translation into Anglo-Norman French prose of part of the Bible (Genesis - Tobit). It reviews the existing hypotheses concerning this manuscript's use of English loan words, its provenance in Reading's monastic community, and its links with a Bible translation commissioned by King John the Good of France. [less ▲]

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See detailThe 'child of Babylon' and the problem of paternity in Medieval French Alexander romances
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Reading Medieval Studies (2013), 39

A study of the use of hybrid physical appearance both to signal and to explore the disputed paternity of Alexander the Great throughout its vernacular French tradition. The article compares the 'child of ... [more ▼]

A study of the use of hybrid physical appearance both to signal and to explore the disputed paternity of Alexander the Great throughout its vernacular French tradition. The article compares the 'child of Babylon' portent and Alexander's son Alior in the twelfth-century French "Roman d'Alexandre" poem cycle, and a fifteenth-century prose adaptation of it. [less ▲]

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See detailA reading of Troubadour insult songs: the Comunals cycle
Leglu, Catherine UL

in Reading Medieval Studies (1996), XXII

An analysis of a cycle of aggressive songs by troubadours.

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