References of "Language and Education"
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See detailDynamic interplay of language policy, beliefs and pedagogy in a nursery class in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Language and Education (2018), 32(5), 444-461

This presentation focuses on the relationship between the language policy, language ideologies and language practices in a nursery class in trilingual Luxembourg. Individual multilingualism is an ... [more ▼]

This presentation focuses on the relationship between the language policy, language ideologies and language practices in a nursery class in trilingual Luxembourg. Individual multilingualism is an educational goal in Luxembourg, a small country in central Europe, and, thus, children learn Luxembourgish from the compulsory nursery school, become literate in German in Year 1 and learn oral and written French from Year 2 and Year 3, respectively. Currently, 62.4% of the children do not speak Luxembourgish on school entry (MENJE 2016). Many speak Portuguese, French or a language of the Balkans. As a result, educational policies focus on the teaching of Luxembourgish from preschool, sometimes at the expense of other languages. Gretsch and Kirsch (2015) developed the app iTEO in order to promote innovative teaching methods that capitalize on the children’s diverse language resources and that promote a dynamic view of bilingualism. This ipad app, which allows for the recording and editing of oral speech, was designed with social-constructivist theories and Bakhtin’s theory of dialogism in mind. This case-study presents the ways in which a preschool teacher’s ideological beliefs influence a child’s language use over a period of two years leading to the child’s understanding of the legitimacy of translanguaging. The focus lies on the interplay between the educational policy focusing on the teaching of Luxembourgish, the teacher’s language ideologies rooted in her multilingual identity and in societal multilingualism, and the child’s experiences of separating languages at home (Kirsch, 2014). The data stem from a qualitative, longitudinal study using a multi-method approach. The study shows that dialogue between teachers, parents, children, policy-makers and researchers can contribute to shifting ideologies and to opening up dynamic languaging spaces. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom language choice to mode choice: how artefacts impact on language use and meaning making in a bilingual classroom
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Language and Education (2013), 27(4), 329342

This paper investigates the interplay of languages and artefacts as resources for meaning making in bilingual education. While previous research on classroom interaction concentrated on either code ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates the interplay of languages and artefacts as resources for meaning making in bilingual education. While previous research on classroom interaction concentrated on either code switching or multimodality, here, I integrate both perspectives and propose a framework for the study of multimodal interaction embedded in a multilingual environment. The paper draws on research in a German–Italian two-wayimmersion classroom in Frankfurt, Germany. The focus of the analysis is on objects and their role in shaping language practices and social interaction. The analysis sheds light on two dimensions of a biliteracy teaching and learning event that centres on objects brought to class by learners: first, it shows how the presence of objects intersects with the conventionalised language choice practices of this classroom. Second, it looks at how interactions around objects alter habitual ways of using languages for both the purpose of teaching and for identifying people, material culture and bodies of knowledge. To conclude I argue that interactions around learner-centred objects can modify pedagogical practice and thereby challenge monolingualising language ideologies. Rather than reifying monolithic identities, social roles and bodies of knowledge, learner-centred objects invite the creation of semiotic spaces in which the multiple life worlds of multilingual learners can thrive. [less ▲]

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See detailSafetalk revisited, or: Language and ideology in Luxembourgish educational policy
Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

in Language and Education (2008), 22(2), 155-169

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (5 UL)