References of "Journal of Technology Transfer"
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See detailHow Much Does It Cost to be a Scientist?
Balsmeier, Benjamin UL; Pellens, Maikel

in Journal of Technology Transfer (2016), 41

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See detailAbsorptive Capacity and Post-Merger Inventor Productivity
Hussinger, Katrin UL

in Journal of Technology Transfer (2012)

Inventors often experience a low productivity after their company has been subject to a merger or acquisition (M&As). It is of central managerial interest to identify factors facilitating the integration ... [more ▼]

Inventors often experience a low productivity after their company has been subject to a merger or acquisition (M&As). It is of central managerial interest to identify factors facilitating the integration of new inventive staff and thereby counteracting innovation declines after M&As. This paper provides empirical evidence into the role of acquiring firms’ absorptive capacity for the post-merger patent productivity of the acquired inventors. Based on a sample of 544 inventors employed by European acquisition targets in the period 2000–2001 it is shown that the post-merger productivity of acquired inventors is significantly higher within acquiring firms with a distinct absorptive capacity. It can be concluded that absorptive capacity is a firm capability that enhances the integration of inventors after firm takeovers. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Nexus between Science and Industry: Evidence from Faculty Inventions
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Schneider, Cedric

in Journal of Technology Transfer (2012)

Knowledge transfer from science to industry has been shown to be beneficial for the corporate partner. In order to get a better understanding of the reasons behind these positive effects, this study ... [more ▼]

Knowledge transfer from science to industry has been shown to be beneficial for the corporate partner. In order to get a better understanding of the reasons behind these positive effects, this study focuses on the junction of science and industry by comparing characteristics of academic inventions that are transferred to industry and those staying in the public sector. Academic inventions are identified via patent applications of German academic scientists. We find that academic patents assigned to corporations are more likely to enable firms reaping short term rather than, possibly more uncertain, long-run returns, in contrast to patents that stay in the public sector. Firms also strive for academic inventions with a high blocking potential in technology markets. Academic patents issued to corporations appear to reflect less complex inventions as compared to inventions that are patented by the public science sector. [less ▲]

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