References of "Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA theory-driven design framework for smartphone applications to support healthy and sustainable grocery shopping
Blanke, Julia UL; Billieux, Joel; Vögele, Claus UL

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNon-problematic and problematic binge-watchers do not differ on prepotent response inhibition: A preregistered pilot experimental study
Flayelle, Maèva; Verbruggen, Frederick; Schiel, Julie et al

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (2020), 2

Binge‐watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of a TV series back‐to‐back) has become standard viewing practice. Yet, this phenomenon has recently generated concerns regarding its potential negative ... [more ▼]

Binge‐watching (i.e., watching multiple episodes of a TV series back‐to‐back) has become standard viewing practice. Yet, this phenomenon has recently generated concerns regarding its potential negative outcomes on the long run. The presumed addictive nature of this behavior has also received increasing scientific interest, with preliminary findings reporting associations between binge‐watching, self‐control impairments, and heightened impulsivity. Nevertheless, previous studies only relied on self‐report data. The current preregistered study therefore investigated whether non‐problematic and problematic binge‐watchers differ not only in self‐report but also in experimental measures of behavioral impulsivity. Based on their viewing characteristics, 60 TV series viewers were allocated to one of three predetermined groups: non‐binge‐watchers, trouble‐free binge‐watchers (absence of negative impact) and problematic binge‐watchers (presence of negative impact). Participants performed tasks assessing response inhibition (Stop‐Signal Task) and impulsive reward seeking (Delay Discounting Task), and completed self‐reported questionnaires on sociodemographics, affect, symptoms of problematic binge‐watching, and impulsive personality traits. According to the preregistered analytic plan, one‐way analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs) were computed to compare the predetermined groups. With gender being controlled for, no differences were identified in self‐report impulsivity and response inhibition abilities. Trouble‐free binge‐watchers reported higher rates of delay discounting than non‐binge‐watchers. Although preliminary, our results challenge the notion that problematic binge‐watching is characterized by the same neuropsychological impairments as in addictive disorders as, contrary to our preregistered hypotheses, no differences emerged between non‐problematic and problematic binge‐watchers regarding self‐control variables considered as hallmarks of the latter. These results suggest the need for formulating and testing alternative conceptualizations of problematic binge‐watching. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (20 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProblematic online sexual activities in men: The role of self‐esteem, loneliness, and social anxiety
Wéry, Aline; Canale, Natale; Bell, Caroline et al

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (2020), 2

Several studies have shown that problematic use of online sexual activities (OSAs) can constitute a dysfunctional coping strategy that reflects a compensatory usage of the Internet. Yet, some specific ... [more ▼]

Several studies have shown that problematic use of online sexual activities (OSAs) can constitute a dysfunctional coping strategy that reflects a compensatory usage of the Internet. Yet, some specific risk factors—widely investigated in the field of general problematic Internet use—have to date been scarcely studied within the context of OSA. Hence, the goal of this study was to test a theoretical model in which self‐esteem, loneliness, and social anxiety are hypothesized to predict the type of OSAs favored and their potential addictive use. To this end, an online survey was conducted in a sample of self‐selected men who used OSAs on a regular basis (N = 209). Results showed that low self‐esteem is positively associated with loneliness and high social anxiety, which were in turn positively related to involvement in two specific OSAs: use of pornography and the search for online sexual contacts. Higher engagement in these OSA activities was related to symptoms of addictive usage. These findings underline the importance in psychological interventions of taking into account the specific OSA practiced to improve self‐esteem and to reduce loneliness and symptoms of social anxiety [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMoral decision-making in video games: A focus group study on player perceptions
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Bernard, Steve UL; Melzer, André UL

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (2020)

Moral dilemmas have become increasingly popular in single player video games, although it is still widely unknown why players find them pleasurable, how they process dilemmas, and which variables affect ... [more ▼]

Moral dilemmas have become increasingly popular in single player video games, although it is still widely unknown why players find them pleasurable, how they process dilemmas, and which variables affect the processing. Therefore, three different focus groups sessions with experienced players (N = 16) were conducted. Player perceptions of meaningful and morally relevant decision situations in video games were grouped for topics and contextualized with theoretical background (e.g., moral disengagement theory). Our findings support the notion that moral decision-making in video games is a dynamic interplay between game and user-dependent variables. Results show that in addition to interactivity, which reflects the inherent property of video games, statements can be broadly grouped into factors that describe player motivation (i.e., why they morally engage or disengage) and influencing factors that shape the moral interaction itself. In summary, the present findings provide insights into players' processing of moral dilemmas in video games. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (12 UL)