References of "Higher Education Policy"
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See detailGame of Brains: Examining Researcher Brain Gain and Brain Drain and Research University Policy
Fu, Yuan Chih; Moradel Vasquez, Juan Jose UL; Macasaet, Bea Treena UL et al

in Higher Education Policy (in press), 36

We leverage a rich bibliometric dataset on Taiwanese academia to explore scientific migration patterns. We investigate the movement and productivity of 21,051 highly active researchers who served in ... [more ▼]

We leverage a rich bibliometric dataset on Taiwanese academia to explore scientific migration patterns. We investigate the movement and productivity of 21,051 highly active researchers who served in Taiwanese higher education institutions based on 30 years’ worth of publication and affiliation records from 1991 to 2020. The analysis shows evidence of brain drain in Taiwan since the 2010s, with the U.S. being both the biggest source of inbound researchers to Taiwan and top destination for researchers emigrating from Taiwan. China comes a close second to the U.S. as the top destination for outbound scholars. We also study how Taiwan’s universities recruited talent after the country adopted the 2005 excellence initiative and confirm the converging number of scholars recruited by World Class Universities (WCUs) and non-WCUs as WCUs, surprisingly, exhibit a dramatic decrease in new recruits. Our evidence uncovers that inbound scholars, after their move, are more productive than non-mobile colleagues; however, this effect declines over time. We discuss implications for the study of excellence initiatives and mechanisms of talent circulation that greatly impact research production and research university development. [less ▲]

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See detailEuropeanizing Universities: Expanding and Consolidating Networks of the Erasmus Mundus Joint Master Degree Programme (2004–2017)
Marques, Marcelo; Zapp, Mike UL; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Higher Education Policy (2022), 35

The Europeanization of higher education has gained considerable scope and momentum over the past quarter century. Whereas the coordinative Bologna process, with soft governance mechanisms, have ... [more ▼]

The Europeanization of higher education has gained considerable scope and momentum over the past quarter century. Whereas the coordinative Bologna process, with soft governance mechanisms, have facilitated standardization across countries, European Commission funding programs targeted universities more directly. The Erasmus Mundus Joint Degree Programme, as an incentive-based program, epitomizes the dynamics of such European funding management. Notably, it has established expanding university networks across Europe and unique new tertiary degrees that facilitate student mobility. Applying social network analysis to 561 participating universities through several program cycles, we longitudinally examine three key patterns in the program’s development: the expansion of the programme, the consolidation of networks, and the participation of and coordination by central universities in these processes. Program participation increased considerably across cycles, even as established networks were consolidated, largely through re- accreditation of established programs. Moreover, we identify those universities that assume a central position in the inter-organizational structure of this international program. These universities actively facilitate the evolving Europeanization of higher education by strengthening inter-university networks via a signature EU program. [less ▲]

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See detailThe OECD and Higher Education Policy: Agenda-Setting, Organizational Dynamics and the Construction of Convening Authority
Harmsen, Robert UL; Braband, Gangolf

in Higher Education Policy (2021), 34(3), 582-602

The article examines the engagement of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with the higher education sector. Detailed empirical case studies probe the ultimate failure to ... [more ▼]

The article examines the engagement of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) with the higher education sector. Detailed empirical case studies probe the ultimate failure to launch of the OECD’s Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) initiative, as well as the recent demise of the long-established Institutional Management in Higher Education (IMHE) programme and the development of a new initiative on the evaluation of higher education system performance. The analysis is informed by a theoretical framework drawn from the wider international organization literature, focusing on internal organizational dynamics and the manner in which international organizations seek to construct their external authority. A complex portrait of the OECD as a policy actor correspondingly emerges, focused on agenda-setting within the organization in terms which highlight the interplay of organizational, governmental and stakeholder interests. This is further suggestive of a broader research agenda exploring emerging international-level policy processes in higher education. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning the (Most) Mobile University: The Centrality of International Student Mobility in Luxembourg’s Higher Education Policy Discourse
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Karl, Ute; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Higher Education Policy (2020), 33

The nexus of national educational and migration policies and international student mobility (ISM) in Europe becomes strikingly visible in Luxembourg. ISM is central for higher education policy in ... [more ▼]

The nexus of national educational and migration policies and international student mobility (ISM) in Europe becomes strikingly visible in Luxembourg. ISM is central for higher education policy in Luxembourg, but also for larger questions of social integration and economic development. Based on a discourse analysis of the political debates surrounding the foundation of the University of Luxembourg in 2003, we analyze how and why ISM became a cornerstone of higher education policy in Luxembourg. Our findings reveal that, on the one hand, incoming student mobility — and the establishment of an international research university — was and is seen as a means of competing for the best and brightest, regionally and globally, and of securing human resources to satisfy a booming, internationalized labor market. On the other hand, outgoing student mobility has traditionally been viewed as the main mechanism to establish international networks across Europe and foster elites back home. Both incoming and outgoing mobility are thought necessary to establish and maintain a competitive and sustainable knowledge economy. Reconstructing the underlying rationales behind the support for ISM as the key to higher education policy, we explain why Luxembourg currently has the highest proportion of ISM worldwide. [less ▲]

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See detailTaking Their Place: Educational Expansion and Inequality of Educational Opportunities—A Gendered Perspective
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; BLANK, Carmel; Rotman, Assaf

in Higher Education Policy (2018)

Educational expansion and gender differences in educational attainment have both been studied in various contexts, but their interdependence has rarely been examined, and even then, yielded conflicting ... [more ▼]

Educational expansion and gender differences in educational attainment have both been studied in various contexts, but their interdependence has rarely been examined, and even then, yielded conflicting results. We focus on the expansion of tertiary education in Israel resulting from several reforms introduced in the mid-1990s and ask two questions: (a) How did educational expansion affect inequality of opportunity (IEO)? (b) Did the effect of educational expansion differ between men and women? Based on the Israeli census, we examine changes in IEO between 1995 and 2008 across all levels of education. We find that women from lower socioeconomic background were the main beneficiaries of the expansion, especially at the MA+ level. Several explanations for these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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