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See detailParent-child value similarity and subjective well-being in the context of migration: An exploration
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Boehnke, Klaus; Knafo, Ariel et al

in Family Science (2012), 3(1), 55-63

Intergenerational value similarity has a different meaning for migrants and minorities compared to the majority society. Whereas high parent-child value similarity among majority families more likely ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational value similarity has a different meaning for migrants and minorities compared to the majority society. Whereas high parent-child value similarity among majority families more likely indicates successful internalization of societal values, high intergenerational similarity among migrants may indicate a lack of social integration into the host society. The present paper links parent-adolescent value similarity among migrant/minority and majority families to subjective well-being in two societies, Germany and Israel (Total N = 977 families). Analyses assess intergenerational similarity on all values from the Schwartz value circumplex. Among majority groups intergenerational value similarity is a predictor of life satisfaction. In minority groups it is more so a low distance of a family’s value preferences to the modal values of the majority group that predicts life satisfaction – but only in Israel. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational value transmission within the family and the role of emotional relationship quality
Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Family Science (2012), 3(1), 4-12

Emotional relationship quality of adolescents/emerging adults toward their mothers is addressed: (1) as a transmission belt for the intergenerational transfer of general values and (2) regarding the two ... [more ▼]

Emotional relationship quality of adolescents/emerging adults toward their mothers is addressed: (1) as a transmission belt for the intergenerational transfer of general values and (2) regarding the two-step model of value internalization. The sample consisted of N = 73 dyads of mothers and their 12–25–year-old children (51 daughters, 22 sons) living in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Mothers and adolescents/emerging adults reported on their general value orientations; in addition, adolescents/emerging adults reported on emotional relationship quality toward mothers. In a subsample of n = 46 mother-adolescent/emerging adult dyads, additional information was available regarding maternal socialization goals, adolescents’/emerging adults’ perceptions of these goals, and adolescents’/emerging adults’ perceived value similarity with mothers. Attachment/closeness of adolescents/emerging adults toward their mothers was related to higher, whereas dislike and worry were related to lower value consensus/congruence. Furthermore, dislike was linked to lower accuracy of value perception, whereas closeness/attachment and worry corresponded with higher perceived similarity to mothers. [less ▲]

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See detailPatterns of relationship regulation: German and French adolescents' perceptions with regard to their mothers.
Albert, Isabelle UL; Trommsdorff, Gisela; Sabatier, Colette

in Family Science (2011), 2(1), 58-67

Following a person-centered approach, the present study focuses on inter- and intracultural similarities and differences in patterns of relationship regulation by adolescents with regard to their mothers ... [more ▼]

Following a person-centered approach, the present study focuses on inter- and intracultural similarities and differences in patterns of relationship regulation by adolescents with regard to their mothers in a sample of 153 French and 154 German adolescents. Starting from theoretical assumptions of individuation in adolescence as the process of balancing autonomy and relatedness, a classification approach was applied providing four theoretically derived clusters of relationship regulation, namely “harmonious,” “tense,” “primary,” and “secondary” relationship regulation patterns. Countries did not differ in numbers of adolescents in the “harmonious” and “tense” clusters. More patterns of “primary” relationship regulation were found between German adolescents and their mothers, whereas French families had a higher prevalence of “secondary” regulation patterns. Clusters were validated by maternal parenting (from adolescents’ perspectives) and adolescents’ optimism. Results on patterns of regulation are discussed in a theoretical framework of intrafamily processes of relationship regulation and implications for family functioning are addressed. [less ▲]

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