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See detailAltered regulation of negative affect in patients with fibromyalgia : a diary study
Rost, Silke; Crombez, Geert; Stefan Sütterlin, Stefan et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2021)

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability ... [more ▼]

Background Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain and often accompanied by cognitive and emotional problems. Adaptation to fibromyalgia may therefore also rely on one's ability to regulate emotional problems. In this study, we examined two indices of emotion regulation, that is, (a) affective instability, involving frequent large fluctuations in self-reported affect, and (b) resting heart rate variability (HRV). 45.4 years; 39 females) and 46 matched healthy controls (M-age = 44.9 years; 37 females). Heart rate was monitored under resting conditions to derive HRV. Subsequently, participants completed an electronic end-of-day diary for 14 consecutive days assessing daily levels of pain, disability, negative affect (NA) and positive affect (PA). Affective instability was operationalized as the mean square of successive differences in daily mood. Results Results indicate increased levels of NA instability and reduced levels of HRV in patients with fibromyalgia in comparison with healthy controls. Furthermore, HRV and NA instability were inversely related. Finally, in patients, higher NA instability was related to increased pain disability. Conclusions Current findings support the idea that patients with fibromyalgia are confronted with fluctuating emotions. These results may have important implications for treatment as they provide support for the use of emotion regulation skills training in patients with fibromyalgia to impact upon NA instability. Significance This study provides novel insight in the link between emotion regulation indices,that is, heart-rate variability and negative affective (NA) instability, in patients with fibromyalgia, and presents evidence for differences in both emotion regulation indices between patients with fibromyalgia and healthy people. Furthermore, results link increased NA instability with increased levels of daily disability in patients with fibromyalgia. Together, these findings offer support for a key role of emotion regulation in fibromyalgia outcomes, providing pathways for clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailDistraction from pain: The role of selective attention and pain catastrophizing
Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL; Gonzalez-Roldan, Ana Maria; Montoya, Pedro et al

in European Journal of Pain (2020), 24(10), 1880-1891

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See detailParental (non-)pain attending verbalizations moderate the relationship between child attention and memory bias for pain
Wauters, Aline; Noel, Melanie; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN (2020), 24(9), 1797--1811

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain ... [more ▼]

Background: Children's negatively biased pain‐related memories (i.e. recalling pain as being more intense or fearful than initially reported) have been recognized as a key factor in explaining child pain development. While mechanisms underlying children's pain memory development remain poorly understood, attention biases and parent language have been implicated in conceptual models. This study examined the association between child pain‐related attention and memory biases and the moderating role of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Methods: Participants were 51 school children and one of their parents. Probability of initial fixation and gaze duration to pain were assessed using eye tracking methodology. Children performed a cold pressor task (CPT) and reported on experienced pain intensity and pain‐related fear. A 3‐minute parent–child interaction upon CPT completion allowed measurement of parental pain and non‐pain attending verbalizations. Children's pain‐related memories were elicited 2 weeks later. Results: Findings indicated that the relationship between maintained attention to pain and fear memory bias was moderated by parental non‐pain attending verbalizations such that higher gaze duration bias was positively associated with fear memory bias but only among children whose parents demonstrated low levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. The opposite pattern was observed for children whose parents showed high levels of non‐pain attending verbalizations. No such effects were observed for child initial attention bias to pain, memory bias for pain and parental pain attending verbalizations. Conclusions: Findings highlight the importance of parental and child pain‐related variables as well as their interaction in understanding negatively biased pain‐related memories. Significance: This study on child pain memories is the first to highlight that characteristics of the social context, such as parental (non‐)pain‐related verbalizations, as well as factors related to the intra‐individual experience of pain, such as child attention bias to pain, should be studied jointly, as they interact with each other in their effect on the emergence of negatively biased memories of painful events. [less ▲]

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See detailSuffering as an independent component of the experience of pain
Bustan, Smadar UL; Gonzalez-Roldan, Ana; Kamping, Sandra et al

in European Journal of Pain (2015)

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